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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, I'm in dire need of some help. There's an issue with my network that has persisted for over a year and I just can't seem to find out how to fix it. Basically, all the devices in my house show that they're connected to the internet (the network icon in the taskbar looks completely normal) but I cannot access the internet. In other words, I'm connected but have no access. Then, I'll reboot my modem and the problem is resolved for a random duration of time (usually a couple hours) before it starts again. It is extremely annoying! The router I use is the Asus RT N65U and I doubt there is anything wrong with it since rebooting the modem usually fixes everything. Is there any setting I can change somewhere to fix this persistent issue? If this is of any importance, there are usually 3-4 people using the network and when the problem happens all of the devices lose access to the internet both wifi users and LAN users. Thanks for all the help.
 

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Have you already tried using alternate DNS servers?

I know you don't want to hear this, but the fact that the problem "auto" corrects after a reboot of the modem tends to steer me towards an issue with the modem itself.

What type of modem are you using and are you on fiber, cable or dsl? Who is your ISP?

Have you contacted your ISP and reported the problem?
 
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That would be my best guess. During the time it "goes out", try doing "nslookup www.google.com" in the command prompt. If that fails, it's your DNS. Google's DNS servers are 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4. Try using those when the problem happens, and it should fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by wevsspot View Post

Have you already tried using alternate DNS servers?

I know you don't want to hear this, but the fact that the problem "auto" corrects after a reboot of the modem tends to steer me towards an issue with the modem itself.

What type of modem are you using and are you on fiber, cable or dsl? Who is your ISP?

Have you contacted your ISP and reported the problem?
I haven't tried using an alternate DNS, I'm not exactly sure how. I'm using a fiber optic connection and the ISP is Bell (Canadian ISP). I have contacted them and they didn't help much. Though, they said the modem was fine. +rep
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvos00 View Post

That would be my best guess. During the time it "goes out", try doing "nslookup www.google.com" in the command prompt. If that fails, it's your DNS. Google's DNS servers are 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4. Try using those when the problem happens, and it should fix it.
I'll try this next time, thanks! Just one thing where do I input those DNS servers? (I'm a noob sorry) +rep
 

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I'm not 100% sure it's a DNS issue you're having, it could well be that the link itself has failed. The next time it goes out, go to a command prompt (in windows) and type "ping 8.8.8.8" before monkeying with your DNS settings. If your connection is still good, it will say something along the lines of "Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=42" and it will repeat a few times. The "time" is the amount of time it takes a round-trip packet to go from your PC to the remote host and back. If it says failed, no route found, or any other than a Reply, then you have a network link issue and changing DNS server settings won't help at all.

ASUS updates the firmware on their routers fairly regularly. You should log-in to your router as admin and check the firmware update link in the interface. I know the newer ones have an option to retrieve and update themselves, and the older ones require that you download a firmware file to your PC then upload the firmware to the modem using the firmware update process. Either way, if you've "never" updated the firmware on your router, that stands as one of the top reasons you might be having issues. Early (especially first-ship) firmware is typically horribly buggy, it often takes 3-5 updates over the course of 6-12 months before a new router product becomes 100% stable.

Greg
 

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Go to you Network and sharing center, select manage adapters on the left. Right click the connected adapter, select properties, select ipv4 , select properties , statically assign your dns there.

When you go down again you can try pinging the inside port on your lan. IE the one that you plug your router into. This will tell you if you are even getting past your router or not
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammong View Post

I'm not 100% sure it's a DNS issue you're having, it could well be that the link itself has failed. The next time it goes out, go to a command prompt (in windows) and type "ping 8.8.8.8" before monkeying with your DNS settings. If your connection is still good, it will say something along the lines of "Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=42" and it will repeat a few times. The "time" is the amount of time it takes a round-trip packet to go from your PC to the remote host and back. If it says failed, no route found, or any other than a Reply, then you have a network link issue and changing DNS server settings won't help at all.

ASUS updates the firmware on their routers fairly regularly. You should log-in to your router as admin and check the firmware update link in the interface. I know the newer ones have an option to retrieve and update themselves, and the older ones require that you download a firmware file to your PC then upload the firmware to the modem using the firmware update process. Either way, if you've "never" updated the firmware on your router, that stands as one of the top reasons you might be having issues. Early (especially first-ship) firmware is typically horribly buggy, it often takes 3-5 updates over the course of 6-12 months before a new router product becomes 100% stable.

Greg
Hey Greg, I'll try pinging that IP address next time it's out. I actually do update my firmware but I'll check if there are any new updates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macnemarion View Post

Go to you Network and sharing center, select manage adapters on the left. Right click the connected adapter, select properties, select ipv4 , select properties , statically assign your dns there.

When you go down again you can try pinging the inside port on your lan. IE the one that you plug your router into. This will tell you if you are even getting past your router or not
Got it, thanks!
 

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+1 for updating modem/router firmware, and then I'd lean toward getting that unit replaced. Talk with your ISP, if you lease it from them, they might have an upgraded model they'll ship to you for free (if your ISP is as outstanding as mine!)

Since the issue is persisting across all devices, it's going to likely boil down to modem/router, or something behind that, which IMO should be your ISP's problem to deal with.

Protip: if you get someone to come over to "diagnose" your problem in person, they'll send an idiot. Of course not all companies are the same, but with two I've dealt with, they key word is "specialist". Ask them to send a "specialist" and they will send someone over with an education. The caliber of the diagnostics and help you'll receive is night and day difference.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LtStinger View Post

+1 for updating modem/router firmware, and then I'd lean toward getting that unit replaced. Talk with your ISP, if you lease it from them, they might have an upgraded model they'll ship to you for free (if your ISP is as outstanding as mine!)

Since the issue is persisting across all devices, it's going to likely boil down to modem/router, or something behind that, which IMO should be your ISP's problem to deal with.

Protip: if you get someone to come over to "diagnose" your problem in person, they'll send an idiot. Of course not all companies are the same, but with two I've dealt with, they key word is "specialist". Ask them to send a "specialist" and they will send someone over with an education. The caliber of the diagnostics and help you'll receive is night and day difference.
This is true. When I call Comcast for cable/modem diagnostics, I tell them I'm an EE and I do networking for a living, and they send the specialist with the $20K TDR cable/protocol analyzer. I haven't had to call them out twice - ever. LOL.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just as a little update, I tried changing my DNS and that didn't do anything. When I pinged 8.8.8.8 I got replies. My firmware is up to date. The only thing I have left to do is call the ISP and call a specialist over and possibly get the unit replaced. Thanks guys.
 

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Good luck. Many ISPs will do their everything in their power to defer the root cause of the problem to the end user (unless you're a high value business client). But in reality, sometimes there really is a problem on their end.

Hopefully they will get your issue resolved for you.
 

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If you can ping 8.8.8.8, it means you have a clear round trip path to the Google DNS servers at least. When you said you changed the DNS server setting, where did you change it - on your local PC or on the Router's DHCP configuration?

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammong View Post

If you can ping 8.8.8.8, it means you have a clear round trip path to the Google DNS servers at least. When you said you changed the DNS server setting, where did you change it - on your local PC or on the Router's DHCP configuration?

Greg
Hi Greg,

I changed it on my local PC not the router's configuration.
 
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