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MegaTechPC
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Discussion Starter #1
So I have all EK nickel-plexi blocks and they have been neglected pretty bad since I put this rig together back in 2013. Needless to say I have some gunk going on and need to tear down the loop, replace tubing and clean the blocks. My question is, is there an effective way to flush the blocks (like with vinegar or something) that will allow me to get away with NOT disassembling the blocks themselves? I get absolutely terrified at the prospect of messing with that O-ring and reassembly. What about flushing with high pressure?

Man, its been a WHILE since I visited the water cooling section!
redface.gif
 

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The best way to get blocks clean is to take them apart. I usually just use warm soapy tap water and a old stiff toothbrush to clean mine. then rinse them with clean distilled water to wash off and minerals from the tap water.

You won't mess us your O-ring if you take your time and just check before you tighten down the bolts slowly and evenly. Honestly if you had the skills to build the system you have the skills to take apart a block and clean it.

Just out of curiosity what type of blocks with you be cleaning? I'd start with the CPU block because they are smaller and it's easier to line up the O-ring.
 

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MegaTechPC
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Discussion Starter #3
EDIT - Actually it looks like I am more dealing with corrosion of the nickel than simply dirty blocks.
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Oh well, time to upgrade anyway!





 

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No way around it. Have to remove blocks and take them apart. It should be fine with just soft soap and warm water. It's EK's own recommendation and so far I've cleaned blocks multiple times (tap water+soft soap) and never hand issues with nickel plating.

Flushing alone will not solve anything. If it was some no restriction block - like universal blocks used for chipsets for example then yes. Whenever micro-channels are involved you have to clean them properly.
 

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MegaTechPC
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Discussion Starter #5
I figured it wouldn't be that easy. I'm just afraid once I get them apart that I won't be able to get the o-ring to seal right afterwards...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Majin SSJ Eric View Post

I figured it wouldn't be that easy. I'm just afraid once I get them apart that I won't be able to get the o-ring to seal right afterwards...
Oh c'mon. It's not that bad.
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Honestly, I was scared to death when I bought my first CPU block and first thing I had to do was to replace insert jetplate for proper configuration. Patiently and calmly did everything properly (always with the question marks if everything will be OK). Even worse was my first VGA block [panic button!] when cleaned pastel (frankly I'm flushing VGA right now because I mixed up additives and now there is some residue inside which means I'm close to taking VGA block apart again - tomorrow or Monday.

What I learned is best to flush blocks within the loop as much as possible before tearing everything down. Cleaning by hand is much more labor intensive, whatever distilled water can flush over few runs the better. Problem arise when we're not talking color issues from mixing dyes/coolants. Flaking of plating or iron fillings or flux that's another matter entirely. It should be cleaned ASAP.

As for technique of cleaning VGA blocks, I never actually remove block from the card. You have to be more careful during re-assembly, but never had issues.It's the only way if time is of the essence.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Majin SSJ Eric View Post

I figured it wouldn't be that easy. I'm just afraid once I get them apart that I won't be able to get the o-ring to seal right afterwards...
Just get some silicon grease, ones used for scuba gear and put it on the o ring and it will sit in place. It's what I use for stubborn o rings.
 
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