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I got my dad a nice USB WIFI adapter that has an antenna on it and it works a lot better than the internet wifi card in his PC. I try to disable and uninstall it from the device manager but when I restart, it installs the drivers right back into it. Am I going to have to physically remove the wifi card from his computer?
 

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it's a dell inspiron desktop so it would be easy to physically remove it, but I don't really want to mess with opening it up right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
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Originally Posted by newbrevolution View Post

Yes, you will have to physically remove the card. Windows will install generic drivers for any new device it sees.
+1

crap...
 

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You should be able to leave it in there...just disable it in device manager. Don't remove it.

Though I am guessing it is a laptop. Most likely the old card is not built in. it will be under a cover. The only card looking thing you can remove that has a couple wires coming off it...though if it is a really crappy one with an internal antenna and no wires coming off it it will be the only thing you can remove that isn't a stick of memory or a hard drive, but I doubt that will be the case.
 

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Originally Posted by Vagrant Storm View Post

You should be able to leave it in there...just disable it in device manager. Don't remove it.

Though I am guessing it is a laptop. Most likely the old card is not built in. it will be under a cover. The only card looking thing you can remove that has a couple wires coming off it...though if it is a really crappy one with an internal antenna and no wires coming off it it will be the only thing you can remove that isn't a stick of memory or a hard drive, but I doubt that will be the case.
Since this was the last reply I will quote this. Thanks all for the help even though I forgot to specify that it was a desktop. It was a desktop Dell Inspiron crappy $300 work PC that my dad uses for grandbaby photos and Microsoft Office. I went ahead and took the WLAN card out because I didn't want it competing with the USB wifi stick I have in there now. I am getting 30 Mbps d/l now from it which is good enough for my dad. The PC is in the basement and my Asus N56U router is in the living room. They pay for Charter's highest service so they get the best internet, landline phone, and cable tv in a contract for $250 a month otherwise I wouldn't let them pay for 100 mbps but it's only an extra $60 a month.

This actually brings me to another question: Do you think having 2 wifi adapters (the internal and the USB) fighting with each other was the reason why the basement's internet signal was weak from the oversaturation of the 2.4 Ghz? I brought my PS3 down here and I was getting maybe 10 mbps and now I get about 20 mbps.
 

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Originally Posted by Thready View Post

This actually brings me to another question: Do you think having 2 wifi adapters (the internal and the USB) fighting with each other was the reason why the basement's internet signal was weak from the oversaturation of the 2.4 Ghz? I brought my PS3 down here and I was getting maybe 10 mbps and now I get about 20 mbps.
It is possible...the more radios you have working on the same band the more interference and noise there is in the air. However, you typically need to have a lot more than a few sources to have issues.

How old was the card you removed? If it was ancient and was actually a wireless B it could have been slowing the access point down by forcing it to be wireless N/G/B mode and costing you some performance...though you have one of the better consumer grade routers you can get so I'd hope that this wouldn't be an issue, but I personally haven't used that router with a wireless B device around. The router might be working in 5GHz mode now too if the setting is set to auto. With the old card gone all your devices are probably 5GHz capable. The 5GHz band will typically get you a faster connection, but the signal will degrade faster so you get less range. Though it usually has no issue going through just one floor and/or a few walls.

It could also have been outside sources beyond your control. The last time you tried the PS3 your neighbors might have had more devices on the same channel as you...perhaps even devices that were trying to connect over and over to your network. The PS3 might have had a firmware update that helped its wireless connection. LOL heavy solar flares that day...you never know. Wireless can be finicky sometimes and just work slower for no apparent reason as well.
 

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I'd just disable it in network and sharing center. Then the only device picking up wifi would be your USB stick.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vagrant Storm View Post

It is possible...the more radios you have working on the same band the more interference and noise there is in the air. However, you typically need to have a lot more than a few sources to have issues.

How old was the card you removed? If it was ancient and was actually a wireless B it could have been slowing the access point down by forcing it to be wireless N/G/B mode and costing you some performance...though you have one of the better consumer grade routers you can get so I'd hope that this wouldn't be an issue, but I personally haven't used that router with a wireless B device around. The router might be working in 5GHz mode now too if the setting is set to auto. With the old card gone all your devices are probably 5GHz capable. The 5GHz band will typically get you a faster connection, but the signal will degrade faster so you get less range. Though it usually has no issue going through just one floor and/or a few walls.

It could also have been outside sources beyond your control. The last time you tried the PS3 your neighbors might have had more devices on the same channel as you...perhaps even devices that were trying to connect over and over to your network. The PS3 might have had a firmware update that helped its wireless connection. LOL heavy solar flares that day...you never know. Wireless can be finicky sometimes and just work slower for no apparent reason as well.
It was the Dell DW 1502

http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/driverdetails?driverid=162YY

It claims that it is 802.11 N but it was giving me less than 10 mbps. This crap USB one I put in there is giving me about 30 mbps. I went ahead and removed the internal one and I am going to throw it away probably since I beat it to death messing around with it.
 

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it shouldnt be casuing interference though as it wouldnt be talking when turned off *thinks*
 

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Originally Posted by Ulquiorra View Post

it shouldnt be casuing interference though as it wouldnt be talking when turned off *thinks*
Well the problem was that it was running while my USB adapter was running. I didn't realize but the computer was trying to use both wifi adapters at the same time. But ever since I removed it, things in the basement seem to be better. It might be the placebo effect though.
 
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