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Hi.

I'm actually writing a mini-guide for new people looking to get into programming and I'll be done with it in a few days.

In the mean time, you may want to read these threads for advice:

Link 1
Link 2
Link 3 (Slightly outdated FAQ)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by {Unregistered} View Post

Hi.
I'm actually writing a mini-guide for new people looking to get into programming and I'll be done with it in a few days.
In the mean time, you may want to read these threads for advice:
Link 1
Link 2
Link 3 (Slightly outdated FAQ)
Isn't learning Python better for a starter? I want to learn too, and a few programmers I know recommended me to start off with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by {Unregistered} View Post

Hi.
I'm actually writing a mini-guide for new people looking to get into programming and I'll be done with it in a few days.
In the mean time, you may want to read these threads for advice:
Link 1
Link 2
Link 3 (Slightly outdated FAQ)
I am a little bit confused from the first link a lot say start with Java and some say start with C#
 

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What I mainly want to emphasize is that it doesn't really matter which particular language you start off with because what matters is learning the basics of programming (read quote below).

Out of Java and C#, I personally started with Java (actually I first started with Python) for Object-oriented programming. You can't go wrong with either and both have great resources on the Internet, but currently, the popular opinion seems to be C# so maybe you can start with that.

Python is a good language too if you want to start off with programming but I personally thought that Java really taught me the basic object-oriented programming concepts that I would have otherwise not learnt properly had I stuck with Python (because Python unlike Java doesn't force you to use the OOP paradigm).

Read this please.
Quote:
Originally Posted by {Unregistered} View Post

Don't choose between two particular languages like C and C# but rather decide between different programming paradigms to learn and practice using.
The first and foremost priority should be to grasp basic simple concepts that are consistent throughout all languages.
These may include concepts like variables, methods (functions), conditions (if...else etc.), loops, iteration, recursion, arrays, Strings etc.
Basically data structures and use and manipulation of data.
You may use ANY language to learn these concepts, from high level scripting languages like Python to (relatively) low level languages like C. The choice of the language doesn't really matter as long as you know how the different parts of a program fit and work together.
After that, you may want to look deeper into the different styles (paradigms) programming.
The primarily popular styles include procedural, functional and object-oriented. Read their wiki articles (they're quite useful actually) and read the corresponding pseudo-code posted and try to understand how they are similar yet different. The basic building blocks of programming will stay the same throughout all kinds of programming but there may be some specific differences like how object-oriented languages are based on the concepts of Classes and Objects (again read wiki articles for a wealth of information (for a beginner at least) interacting together.
Once you get to this stage where you've had experience with a language and feel you've grasped the fundamentals and are about to move to deciding between the styles of programming, then you can take advice from us regarding your choice of language to learn.
These days object-oriented languages are considered to be the most useful because they are used in developing large programs that interact together (and they provide programs with certain abilities such as polymorphism etc.). If you choose to start with an object-oriented programming language, I'd recommend either Java or C#. I started with Java but you can start with C# since you've already set it up.
The least of your worries should be syntax and the code. Learn to program, NOT to code. Huge difference.
Once you learn the difference between programming and coding, you should be able to proudly call yourself a programmer.
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If you have any questions, be free to ask them here or by PM if you wish.
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P.S. I hope this post makes sense.
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If the other posters have anything to contribute or add to this post, then please surely do.
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