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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's the best way to have a virtual machine show up on your network but NOT connect to the internet? I thought adding a custom VMnet and giving it a 0.0.0.0 subnet would do it but the VMWare version I have won't let me edit the subnet.

Example of what I want:

Physical machines:
-Office 1
-Office 2
-VMWare Host
Virtual machines on VMWare host
---E-mail server
---Print Server

I'd like the print server to show up on the network but not have internet access. I get the feeling this is simple but I'm not looking at it the right way.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Damarious25;12035823
What's the best way to have a virtual machine show up on your network but NOT connect to the internet? I thought adding a custom VMnet and giving it a 0.0.0.0 subnet would do it but the VMWare version I have won't let me edit the subnet.

Example of what I want:

Physical machines:
-Office 1
-Office 2
-VMWare Host
Virtual machines on VMWare host
---E-mail server
---Print Server

I'd like the print server to show up on the network but not have internet access. I get the feeling this is simple but I'm not looking at it the right way.
Considering that you should be using static IP addresses for your servers, you should just go into the Guest, set a static IP address, and then leave the default gateway field blank.

I assume you're talking about the Print server?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey. Thanks for all the advice. Host only didn't connect to the entire network, just to the host machine. And changing the subnet to 0.0.0.0 in the virtual OS turned it into a public network and wouldn't share the printer with the rest of the network. Eventually I just bridged the connection and gave it the network subnet. It works but I want to disable it. I also thought about blocking it at the router but my router only filters wireless mac address.

@com. it's a small network so I just left DHCP on. the only static IP I set is for the virtual OS print server. your saying if I give the host machine a static as well I might get closer to what I want?
Here are the added OS's. It's Windows 7 on the print server that's giving me trouble. With subnet 0.0.0.0 it only allows to select public network.... as far as I could tell but it was very late. Also, Windows 7 was probably a poor choice but I'm a student and only have access to so many keys. I'd rather not run pirated OS's and I'm still learning linux so I take what I can get.

Physical machines:
-Office 1 (Windows 7)
-Office 2 (Windows 7)
-VMWare Host (Server 08 R2 running VMWare)
Virtual machines on VMWare host:
---E-mail server (Windows XP - also used for web browsing on Server08 machine)
---Print Server (Windows 7 - minimal x86/512Ram)
 

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I use "bridge" mode every time I setup a VM. As stated before, just don't put a gateway on the guest. Since it does not have a gateway, this will disrupt it's ability to talk to public addresses. This will only allow it to talk to other clients on it's same subnet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by Thorn-Blade
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I use "bridge" mode every time I setup a VM. As stated before, just don't put a gateway on the guest. Since it does not have a gateway, this will disrupt it's ability to talk to public addresses. This will only allow it to talk to other clients on it's same subnet.

The OS is Windows 7 and without the subnet Windows 7 thinks your on a public network and it wouldn't let me share the printer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Windows 7 won't allow "me" any other subnet then 255.255.255.0.

When I change the gateway the OS changes the "home network" to a "public network" and won't really let me share the printer with the machines on the "home network"
 

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Best practice is to give all your server machines, including the host, static IP addresses. Unless you have an advanced DHCP server, you should assign addresses that are outside the range of your DHCP scope.

In any case. ALL of your machines should have a matching subnet - 255.255.255.0 is standard. Your workstations can be left in DHCP mode. Your servers, I would assign static IP addresses beginning at say, 192.168.1.10 (as an example).

So, interface for VM host machine would have the following (Assuming you're on the 192.168.1.0/24 subnet):

IP Address: 192.168.1.10
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: <blank>

DNS fields are blank.

Email Server:

IP Address: 192.168.1.25 (Easy to remember since SMTP uses port 25 by default)
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1 (or whatever your router is)

DNS: 208.67.222.222 (OpenDNS-1)
DNS: 208.67.220.220 (OpenDNS-2)

Print Server

IP Address: 192.168.1.11
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: <blank>

DNS blank.

-------------------

On all your Windows Vista / 7 machines, you can change the "location" of the network from Public to Work, without an issue. Do this through Network & Sharing Center

Your workstations should pick up IP address, subnet mask, default gateway and DNS settings from your DHCP server. However, for internal name resolution you're going to be using NETBIOS name resolution since you don't have a local domain.

Anyways, that's all you should need to do. You will need to enable file & printer sharing on the print server at least.
 
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