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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a birthday coming up and my gf keeps asking me what I want.. So I figured why not another HDD
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going for the Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB.

I'm going to use that for Win7 and Ubuntu dual boot which are the two I plan on using for a long time.

I will use my 200GB Samsung for music, ISO's, pictures, ect.

The 160GB Seagate I want to use to learn a couple other distro's since I've been using Ubuntu for a bit and feel comfortable enough, and just curious, to try other distro's.

I'm looking for a couple distro's that will teach me along the way. I really don't think I know enough to try it but I figured why not. I was really wanting to try Arch but wasn't sure if that was too advanced and also wanted to give Fedora a try. If there are a couple anyone thinks will be nice and easy for learning then please leave a reply to help with my decision.

I know I can read about them, which I've done and am doing, but would like some input from people that actually have experience with them.

Thanks for any help with my decision's. Back to reading for me
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I gave Mint a try and liked it but stuck with Ubuntu. I'll do some more reading on Fedora, I'm thinking that that's the one without the mp3 support and I have lots of mp3's I would want to use so that distro may be ruled out.

Bday isn't until the 18th so I still have plenty of time to do some reading. I may just hold out until I take my Linux classes then I'll hopefully be experienced enough to setup Arch
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Fedora is pretty cake walk. Mp3 and other codec support is easy to setup. I'm not sure if your going to get that much out of it coming from ubuntu though. It's not much if at all harder to use.
 

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Or go away from Linux and give NetBSD a try. Excellent documentation, can be built with minimalism, or eye candy in mind. Rock-solid stability, compatibility and usability. You can learn a lot from NetBSD. I learned UNIX at UCLA and started off with Sun OS 5 and FreeBSD. Going from BSD to Linux is easier than vice-versa, so if you want to learn more about *nix in general, I suggest you start with a BSD
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In my opinion everyone new to Linux should start with Ubuntu or Fedora. (Or LinuxMint which is essentially the exact same as Ubuntu)

Debian is also a popular one, as it is what Ubuntu is built from.

Many people like openSUSE and Mandriva. I have tried them both and personally have been very unimpressed with them.

Once you begin to explore and become more accustomed to the wonderful world that is Linux tackle Arch Linux, its worth every bit of effort (and really it looks a lot more intimidating then it actually is).

If you wish to punish yourself, try Gentoo.

On a personal note, my next venture is Slackware, quite looking forward to trying it out.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by japan1
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Arch is pretty difficult to get running, but if you do try it don't use the Arch Beginner's Guide, use this instead.

Other distro's worth looking at might be Mint, and its many editions, Fedora, PCLinuxOS or Gentoo, although Gentoo can be pretty tricky to set up too.

What makes you say that? The arch beginners guide is fantastic. Also, installing Arch is not as daunting a task as people make it out to be.

As soon as people see text interfaces they just associate it with being impossible. The installation is actually very easy to follow and very little has to be toyed around with.

As for Gentoo, it can be a monstrous task. A base install of Gentoo has you compile all the packages yourself which is not fun and the gain you get from using it (unless you are a very advanced user) is not worth the hours you will spend installing the OS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I read through the Arch beginners guide and it actually didn't seem too bad, I may just be thinking I don't know all that much but I do.. I'll go for it anyways, its a spare drive anyways and will be fun to do in my free time.

As for the other distro's I really want to try as many as I can so I'll just have to try them one by one. Not sure what order would be best to try them in (say Ubuntu is built off Debian so try Ubuntu first) but some reading will probably help me with that.

Thanks for the reply's
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