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Discussion Starter #1
Hello I am new here.<br><br>
I am not very familiar with overclocking, I have never really experimented with CPU overclocking before, However I have with my video card.<br><br>
At the moment i have an Intel Pentium 4 3.0ghz Presscott, And I really have no headroom for overclocking with a stock fan since it runs very hot.<br><br>
I have a few questions.<br><br>
1. The E6600 is $495 while the E6700 is $889, Is it worth the extra money to step up and get the E6700?<br><br>
2. I know this differs depending on system setup. However on Average, With stock cooling, How much can I overclock from stock speeds and get a stable temperature and have the proccessor run stable.<br><br>
3. Does CPU-Z Overclock CPU's or only display information about the core clock/voltages/fsb. Should I use a program to overclock my CPU or do it via the BIOS config?. Do I need to overvolt my CPU when I overclock it? If so how Do I overvolt? and how much do i need to overvolt?<br><br>
I am pretty new to this so any replies would be appreciated, Thankyou.<br>
Kidcash.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kidcash</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hello I am new here.<br><br>
I am not very familiar with overclocking, I have never really experimented with CPU overclocking before, However I have with my video card.<br><br>
At the moment i have an Intel Pentium 4 3.0ghz Presscott, And I really have no headroom for overclocking with a stock fan since it runs very hot.<br><br>
I have a few questions.<br><br>
1. The E6600 is $495 while the E6700 is $889, Is it worth the extra money to step up and get the E6700?<br><br>
2. I know this differs depending on system setup. However on Average, With stock cooling, How much can I overclock from stock speeds and get a stable temperature and have the proccessor run stable.<br><br>
3. Does CPU-Z Overclock CPU's or only display information about the core clock/voltages/fsb. Should I use a program to overclock my CPU or do it via the BIOS config?. Do I need to overvolt my CPU when I overclock it? If so how Do I overvolt? and how much do i need to overvolt?<br><br>
I am pretty new to this so any replies would be appreciated, Thankyou.<br>
Kidcash.</div>
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1. If you're overclocking, stick to the E6600. They're not different, except for the higher multiplier.<br><br>
2. That depends on your case and airflow and a few other things like luck. Often people have reached 3 GHz with a tad high temperatures.<br><br>
3. It only displays information.<br>
3a. Often, yes. If you really want to overvolt, do it in very small increments. It's not like you're running 1.25v and then just you think "Oh well, lets get more volts" and you're running at 1.65v. That's a no-no.<br>
You max want to go 0.01v at a time, while testing for stability.<br><br>
*EDIT*<br><br>
As "The Duke" would've said:<br>
HI and WELCOME <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smile">
 

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1. how much do you feel like spending? i don't think it is worth it as the E6600s are pretty good overclockers.<br>
2. with a good system setup expect at least 3.0ghz on a 6600 with good cooling.<br>
3. you put more voltage as you need it. sometimes you can get pretty far without raising the vcore, but if you hit a wall will have to raise it.
 
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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cgrado</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">1. how much do you feel like spending? i don't think it is worth it as the E6600s are pretty good overclockers.<br>
2. with a good system setup expect at least 3.0ghz on a 6600 with good cooling.<br>
3. you put more voltage as you need it. sometimes you can get pretty far without raising the vcore, but if you hit a wall will have to raise it.</div>
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Well said <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smile"> +Rep
 

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well just put it this way, the lower the multi the higher the fsb needs to be to gain the same overclock.<br><br>
eg<br><br>
a fsb of 200 X 10 ( just the multiplier il use as an example ) = 2000mhz or 2ghz<br><br>
with a higher multi:<br><br>
a fsb of 200 X 11 = 2200mhz or 2.2ghz<br><br>
so you see wuth a higher multi you can gain better overclocks with the same fsb<br><br>
with the lower multi you would have to use a 220 fsb to attain 2.2ghz.<br><br><br>
so really it all depends on how much you wana overclock it and how much you wana spend, they both have 4mb of level 2 cache so that doesnt matter.
 

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What do you need to run that a Overclocked E6400 would not be over kill? I have seen people reach more than 3GHz with a E6400. The E6400 is going to be awesome compared to a 3ghz prescott <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smile">.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kidcash</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hello I am new here.<br><br>
I am not very familiar with overclocking, I have never really experimented with CPU overclocking before, However I have with my video card.<br><br>
At the moment i have an Intel Pentium 4 3.0ghz Presscott, And I really have no headroom for overclocking with a stock fan since it runs very hot.<br><br>
I have a few questions.<br><br>
1. The E6600 is $495 while the E6700 is $889, Is it worth the extra money to step up and get the E6700?<br><br>
2. I know this differs depending on system setup. However on Average, With stock cooling, How much can I overclock from stock speeds and get a stable temperature and have the proccessor run stable.<br><br>
3. Does CPU-Z Overclock CPU's or only display information about the core clock/voltages/fsb. Should I use a program to overclock my CPU or do it via the BIOS config?. Do I need to overvolt my CPU when I overclock it? If so how Do I overvolt? and how much do i need to overvolt?<br><br>
I am pretty new to this so any replies would be appreciated, Thankyou.<br>
Kidcash.</div>
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E6600 is probably better, as it will fairly often o/c to X6800 speeds on stock voltage, although you may need to increase voltage slightly. My advise would be to save the extra money and go for an E6600 over an E6700. They are the same CPU, but one with 11% higher stock frequency than the other and a higher multi. An 11% o/c is pretty much guaranteed most of the time for an E6600, so even if you couldn't go any higher (unlikely) you'd still be getting E6700 performance, for E6600 money.<br><br>
With stock cooling, I'd expect you to be able to achieve a stable o/c (on average) of around 12.5% whilst still maintaining reasonable (ie within design perimeters at 100% CPU utilisation) temperatures. 12.5% would be a total average o/c for all desktop CPUs from P1 to Core 2, in my own personal experience. With Core 2 Duo / Extreme, many people have been achieving 20%+ o/c's on stock voltage and cooling, although this isn't guaranteed for every CPU.<br><br>
CPU-Z is an information only program that displays information about your CPU, motherboard and RAM etc. When overclocking, you would usually use your motherboard's BIOS settings, which is why it is important to get a motherboard that is well known for having a good o/c'ing feature set.<br><br>
Good overclocking requires research (which you're currently doing), money (to buy "enthusiast" hardware) and luck. If you're extremely lucky you can stumble upon a good o/c'ing CPU, motherboard and RAM by pure chance, but it doesn't happen often. Set a budget, research your build and hope you're lucky enough to get some really good silicone.<br><br>
If you're serious about getting a good o/c, you'll need a good cooling solution. Air cooling will take you so-far, but to go that extra mile you should consider water cooling. Fortunately, the Core 2 CPUs run relatively cool, so high-end air cooling will often be sufficient for pretty decent o/c's, although cooler is always better, so water cooling is almost always desirable.<br><br>
Over-volting is only required to stabilise a CPU (prevent it from producing errors) when it is overclocked. Over-volting is done (like most overclocking) from your motherboard's BIOS. Again, getting a good o/c'ing motherboard is essential here, as many "standard" motherboards don't allow manual control of CPU voltage though the BIOS. With Core 2 Duo / Extreme, current thinking is that 1.55v is a "safe" maximum when a chip is being cooled by water cooling and 1.45v is "safe" for long term use with air cooling, although this does depend on what specific cooling is being used and what temperatures are being achieved. Also, what is currently considered "safe" for long term o/c'ing may change over time as overclockers gain more experience with Core 2. It's always best to use as little additional voltage as possible for long term overclocking, as too much extra voltage can insidiously and permanently damage your CPU.<br><br>
Highly-Annoyed
 
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You also have to think if you need the extra speed. I think a E6400 will send the bottle neck back to the graphics card if you had a 7950GX2. I could be wrong about this one tho.<br><br>
So the question is first do you need the power? Before we can anwser is it worth it.
 

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here's someone else so far:<br><a href="http://www.overclock.net/intel-general/124283-there-any-way-i-can-overclock.html" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a319/kakaxbox/cpu-3698.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"></a>
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for replies.<br><br>
I will most likely be running stock cooling, and may include an additional fan to bring the heat produced by the cpu away and out of the case.<br><br>
I plan to get the E6600 and overclock it. But are all the higher end CPU's the same except for the higer clockrate??<br><br>
I also plan to get a high end Nvidia card such as the 7950GX2 or a 7900GTX.<br><br>
For good Overclocking Capabilities including Overvolting, what motherboard do you reccomend? I also want a motherboard which can support DDR Ram speeds upto DDR800.<br><br>
If i was to overclock a E6600 from stock to 2.8 or 3, would i need to overvolt? if so then how much, 0.0.1V more?
 

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Several good motherboards. Asus P5B-deluxe, P5WDH, Gigabyte DS3, S3, DQ6. stick with teh P965 chipsets and 975X. the G965 has onboard gfx and isn't as good as the P965. the 975X supports ATI crossfire out of the box and nvidia SLi with modded drivers. the P965 chipset can also support SLi with modded drivers.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have the Gigabyte DS3 in mind,<br>
If i get the Nvidia 7950GX2 will it have any heat problems or will the stock heatsink and fan keep it cool, keeping in mind that i'll be running it at stock speeds.
 

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at stock speeds, it should be fine as long as there is good airflow in the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
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Originally Posted by <strong>cgrado</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">at stock speeds, it should be fine as long as there is good airflow in the case.</div>

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</div>Well My CPU will be watercooled. <br />
The only Casefan i will have is a sidefan that will blow cold air into the case. Do you think that would be a sufficient supply of cold air into the case for the GX2?
 

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what case?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
<a href="http://www.nzxt.com/products/nemesis_elite/" target="_blank">http://www.nzxt.com/products/nemesis_elite/</a> - This is a NZXT case so im not sure if the pump for the watercooling can be mounted on it. On the thermaltake website it said the pump can be mounted on thermaltake cases. im not sure about other cases. Thats if i DO decide to get watercooling, otherwise, would that be a good case? In the case if i get watercooling, the rear fans will be removed to make room for the radiator, and the only fan will be the sidefan. <br />
<br />
If i do not get watercooling, I will probably take the rear fans off because i dont want it to be noisy.<br />
<br />
Would i be able to install the Thermaltake Bigwater SE on this case?<br />
Otherwise should i get a TT case?<br />
<br />
Thanks.
 
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