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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Howdy folks, long time no see. I've been in the midst of serious medical problems and haven't been able to work for two years.

As it happens, I am retired now but had planned to keep working. The problem was, my legs were going bad and my feet were going numb. The doctors tried angioplasty and stents and more angioplasty to save my legs, but it didn't work. Eventually I couldn't walk across the street or go up my stairs. I also had an aneurysm above the totally blocked junction from the aorta to the femoral arteries in my legs. If it popped, I would be dead in minutes.

My choice was lose my legs or have major surgery. I elected to have the surgery on July 13th this year.

I am happy and sad to report the following:

1. I learned what is worse than torture.
2. I learned the Angels that supported me for a week in the ICU are truly that.
3. I learned what it's like to have a catheter and bag in place for a month.
4. I learned they load you up with saline (8 liters) before and during surgery to keep your body from going into shock.
5. I learned what true friends are in time of need.
6. I learned that prayer and pushing the pain med buttons helps a lot!
7. I learned what it's like to be cut from sternum to groin and groin to upper legs.
8. I learned what a miracle it is doctors have the skill and technology to save my legs.

I can report that NOW I can walk again, but everything else pains terribly. It will be at least 2 more months before I am allowed to exercise and lift over 10 pounds.

The procedure is called

Aortobifemoral Bypass

Well, things being how they are, my BOINC/FOLDING participation are about nil right now. Sorry about that.

BUT! BUT! I plan to return with a 5950 water block review and some other stories.

I enclose a before picture 2 weeks after the surgery and a funny.

Neck Handwriting Wood Font Art



Recently the staples were removed and my friend who drove me to/from the hospital said:

"Well, at least your less magnetic now!

That gave me my first laugh in weeks and it hurt like hell to laugh, but it was worth it! LOL!

:cool:
 

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Stapled huh. They really must want you to hurt. I've been stapled. They did want me to hurt. And it did hurt. It kept bleeding too. You know how staples are. They don't flex much like stiches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Stapled huh. They really must want you to hurt. I've been stapled. They did want me to hurt. And it did hurt. It kept bleeding too. You know how staples are. They don't flex much like stiches.
When they were popping out the staples, I said "eee, ouch!, ouch!" The doctor said "Oh, stop complaining, you're a big boy now!"
I told the doc and nurse "Oh there we go trying to shame the patient into being quiet!" Both didn't speak anymore and I said ouchy, ouch when they came out painfully. Very little to no bleeding thank goodness... Still all swollen up, can't put on shoes yet.

SLOWLY improving daily, still painful with other complications, but making progress... sleep about 18 hours daily off and on.

Thanks to all for kind words...

:cool:
 

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When they were popping out the staples, I said "eee, ouch!, ouch!" The doctor said "Oh, stop complaining, you're a big boy now!"
I told the doc and nurse "Oh there we go trying to shame the patient into being quiet!" Both didn't speak anymore and I said ouchy, ouch when they came out painfully. Very little to no bleeding thank goodness... Still all swollen up, can't put on shoes yet.

SLOWLY improving daily, still painful with other complications, but making progress... sleep about 18 hours daily off and on.

Thanks to all for kind words...

:cool:
 

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Tex I haven’t gone through your exact issues however I did have some serious medical issues. Spent 3 months in hospitals and advanced aftercare and then spent three years recovering and rebuilding. I returned to work about a year ago.
I agree nurses are Angels I have a admiration and and love for nurses.
Pain I feel you, they would shoot me full of morphine before even trying to move me.
Having a belief in some higher power helped me through the valleys and deserts and pushed me to the plateau and on to the mountain top.
Good Luck in your recovery!!!
 

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Wow. And congrats on any/all progress. I'm 54 and have broken so many bones that I lost count by 30 years (surfing, skateboarding, bmx, run over by van on my street enduro motorbike and left for dead, self inflicted fall with massive dislocation and fracture of upper humeris orb (this the worst and hardest to recover from), both wrists broken multiple times, both arms multiple times, tibia and fibula fractured and/or shattered into multiple pieces and requiring two plus years to learn to walk/surf/run again.

But the shoulder dislocation/fracture (2 years ago) has been by far the hardest to recover from, the most painful of injuries sustained to date and still the only one that causes me constant, daily pain. Technically, I could have been on pain meds for the past two years but have refrained from doing so as I'd rather not do the opiod thing; quality sourced Kratom has been markedly effective, however. But I'm back in the water now, surfing ... and getting my paddling game back is my last hurdle as paddling on a surf board is a rather strange and unique set of motions involving the shoulder which is very difficult to train for short of doing the actual motion of paddling, itself. My ortho surgeon said I could expect to have about 70% upward movement (think Hitler salute) in my shoulder/arm but I've now got 100% easy in that injured shoulder but strength past 60% forward arm raise is now the fight. But strength training is something I also know well and expect nothing but progress going forward.

I also never did any assisted and/or professional physical therapy with either my two massively shattered legs (the van run over/hit and run) which took me two years to recover from and nor with the more recent shoulder dislocation/fracture despite my surgeons pleadings with me that I should. But I had self therapied with my legs (from zero movement at all in feet/ankles/legs post casts/wheelchair/walker/crutches) to surfing again two years later and then professional, long distance trail running about six years later (which I still do). That was in my early 20's, though and therefore, progress was much quicker than now, in my mid 50's.

So with the semi recent shoulder injury (for purely financial reasons) I told my ortho shoulder doc that I'd be fine as "I've done this kind of thing before" and wouldn't be visiting any physical therapy sessions and would handle the recovery/therapy myself.

So I feel you, mang.

I will say this, though ... again that shoulder; it was the most massively painful hospital/surgical event I've experienced ... morphine drip constant for four days and still agonizing pain but of course the other effects that go with morphine made it a bit more fun to endure. But the morphine didn't stop the pain a bit, really. But post surgery? I was oddly 100% pain free. I felt fantastic. There was a nurse sitting close to me and looking me over as I "came to" ... I could not believe that the surgery alone could explain my complete lack of pain and I asked her why she was there and what they had given me post surgery as it was the first time in my five day stay that I was 100% pain free. She said she was there to simply observe for two hours and that I had been administered Fentanyl post-op for pain, also the main reason I was under observation. I had never heard of the drug but would later (of late) discover that it's rampant as a killer on the streets currently due to it's being laced with other commonly street-sourced drugs/opioids but I also know that for myself at least and I'm sure many others, when properly administered in a surgical/clinical environment? Fentanyl can also be a god send.

I wish you the best in your recovery...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to all for the kind words. I still can't get into my shoes, but getting closer! Still have ropes of swelling around the incision points, still can't sleep past about 2.5 hrs, but it's getting easier to deal with.

I'll upload a picture when I get my new tattoo... a zipper pull on top of the scars!

Something like this:

Gesture Font Audio equipment Art Temporary tattoo


LOL! (ouch!)

:cool:
 

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Glad you made it through that (y)

Know the feeling, accident nearly 4 years ago, broke a lot(and had complications), result: chronic pain, still on a hefty dose of oxycodone, and thank **** for that(I'm in my mid thirties and imagined my life a fair bit different then what it looks like right now, but ultimately, it is what it is). Stay strong peeps in this threat with similar experiences, and may the pain and other inconveniences stop before dead.
 

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Wow, nice job making it through that and keeping your legs! Wishing you a great recovery.
 

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Quite an adventure!

It will be at least 2 more months before I am allowed to exercise and lift over 10 pounds.
In comparison, my surgical adventure was just a little front and back slit and some titanium additions, but we all get the advice to not lift more than ten pounds whether we're a shrink-wrapped skeleton or Hafthor "The Mountain" Bjornsson with little or no advice on what to do next.
Of course I'm not suggesting that you fail to follow the advice of your medical experts, but your job for the rest of your life is to become as strong as you can and that involves training (and eating, resting and sleeping) - something for which only you, not your medical providers, are responsible. Your adventure continues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Quite an adventure!

but your job for the rest of your life is to become as strong as you can and that involves training (and eating, resting and sleeping) - something for which only you, not your medical providers, are responsible. Your adventure continues.
AMEN to that!

I've lost muscle mass and strength the last few years. I doubt I can throw my bowling ball now...

:cool:
 
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