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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to OC my old 6700K past 4.6 GHz, but I'm running into a problem that I have not been able to find any reference to at all on google: my Asus Z170-A's BIOS isn't letting me set Vcore higher than 1.400v.

The numbers turn yellow when I set it to 1.400, and if I try to set anything higher, it just goes back down to 1.400. And even more strangely, once I go into Windows, all my hardware monitor tools claim that Vcore is set to 1.360, and with LLC set to 4, Vcore maxes out at 1.392.

I'm on the newest version of the bios. The info window at the bottom says the max value is supposed to be 1.700, so I'm flummoxed. I don't have "Extreme over-volting" enabled, but from what I've read, that shouldn't be needed to go above 1.400.

Anyone have a clue what's going on, here?
 

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The numbers turn yellow when I set it to 1.400, and if I try to set anything higher, it just goes back down to 1.400
Did u forget to hit ENTER after typing the numbers into the box?

And even more strangely, once I go into Windows, all my hardware monitor tools claim that Vcore is set to 1.360, and with LLC set to 4, Vcore maxes out at 1.392.
At 1.400 bios setting this could be normal, if 1.392 is at idle & 1.360 at load (due to Vdroop).
And, in windows you'll see Vcore readings in steps of 0.016 - like 1.360, 1.376, 1.392, 1.408 etc, so no 1.400 reading.
 

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Ah, it was Enter all along! Every other setting actually changes when I simply edit it and then hit TAB, but vCore goes back to the old value unless I hit Enter. That's an annoying inconsistency.

Thanks for the heads up about how Windows reports vCore in steps. I was wondering why the heck my numbers were often of by just a smidge!

Out of curiosity, why does Vdroop cause a 1.400 VCore setting to drop to 1.360, but only under load? Is that desirable? If not, how can I prevent it? My main OCing issue at the moment is stability, which makes me think vdroop may be a contributing factor.
 

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Some Vdroop is normal & healthy. Just raise Vcore in bios & monitor Vcore under load in windows to see what the cpu requires.

When you monitor load Vcore & spot that momentary drops below a certain level are what causes cpu to fail stress test, then go back bios to raise Vcore setting accordingly.

You can try LLC5 to counteract some Vdroop at load, I believe LLC4-5 is OK for sync-all-cores overclock in Z170.
"Too high" LLC may cause voltage overshoots into unhealthy range (undetectable) when load is removed, and maybe also higher transients that require more voltage for stability.
 
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