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Hello everyone,

I wanted to gather some opinions on my air cooling set up and see if there is any way to improve the cooling.

I currently have:
CPU: 5800X3D, CPU cooler: Be Quiet Dark Rock 4 (Not the PRO)
GPU: Asus TUF 3080
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow
Intake: 2x Be Quiet Silent Wings 3 140 mm PWN fans (At the front of the case)
Exhaust: 1x Be Quiet Silent Wings 3 120 mm PWN fan (At the back of the case)

The CPU is around the mid 70 degrees (Celsius) during gaming and the GPU is around the low-mid 70s. This is optimized for temp and noise. Just out of curiosity, if I add 1x Silent Wings 3 at the top of the case as intake, will there be much benefit? Or should I stick to how it is now?

Thanks!
 

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Hard to say for sure but my guess is adding a top intake will hurt rather than help.

You have a decent airflow case and good fans. Key to good cooling is smooth case intake to coolers to case exhaust airflow. While curves you currently have are doing fine, you might be able to improve them. I would experiment changing fan rpm to component temp curve by increasing fan speed 100-200rpm faster, Than again by lowering fan speed 100-200rpm. Experiment with cooler fans running faster and again slower too. Collect data (component temps at component full load at differnt case & cooler fan rpm). Use that data to figure out what curve/s give best temps and noise levels.

Link below is to basics for case airflow setup.

Sometimes lower fan speed will give smoother airflow and lower temps than higher fan speed. Again, experimentation (& documentation) is key.
 

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Hello everyone,

I wanted to gather some opinions on my air cooling set up and see if there is any way to improve the cooling.

I currently have:
CPU: 5800X3D, CPU cooler: Be Quiet Dark Rock 4 (Not the PRO)
GPU: Asus TUF 3080
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow
Intake: 2x Be Quiet Silent Wings 3 140 mm PWN fans (At the front of the case)
Exhaust: 1x Be Quiet Silent Wings 3 120 mm PWN fan (At the back of the case)

The CPU is around the mid 70 degrees (Celsius) during gaming and the GPU is around the low-mid 70s. This is optimized for temp and noise. Just out of curiosity, if I add 1x Silent Wings 3 at the top of the case as intake, will there be much benefit? Or should I stick to how it is now?

Thanks!
I don't have any empirical evidence that my way works the best, but how I setup a build for a client was to use the top fans as exhaust, and the front fans and rear fan as intake. I then turned the CPU cooler to blow upwards instead of backwards.

I would recommend, at a minimum to get another intake fan and mount some top fans.
 

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I would set up your case where air can move though it as efficiently as possible. Try to visualize intake air as it would travel through the case and make sure it doesn't have restrictions, weird bends, or other obstacles to overcome. Your exhaust fans should compliment that path of least resistance.

Anytime you can exchange air in the case as quickly as possible the closer to ambient your case temp will be. Components will show the same effect.

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Hot air rises up start from there :) Flow, kinda like gravity don't work against it. vertical gpu needs a set back from front of case, it head needs room to breath. glass panel front case is annoying as is the flat back annoying also. Case designers....
Heat does not rise in a 40L box where there is even 1 single fan with minimal airflow. It will overwrite the natural convection.

[email protected] +1 [email protected] with tower cooler is perfect for that case . I would block the top mesh (with seethrough tape or anything ) to prevent fresh air escaping there.
 

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make sure you have positive pressure, u can check with piece of paper cut to the size of spare fan mount, adjust fan speeds till paper gets blown.


intakes are 6 x 120 and 1 x 140 exhaust..
I just learned this yesterday mine wasnt positive pressure, now it is, i have 1200rpm on my intakes and 888rpm on 140mm exhaust, 1600rpm intake and 140mm exhaust at 1100rpm, another "open source" fancontrol profile 2000rpm intake and exhaust 1300rpm.

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Hot air rises up start from there :) Flow, kinda like gravity don't work against it. vertical gpu needs a set back from front of case, it head needs room to breath. glass panel front case is annoying as is the flat back annoying also. Case designers....
What TeslaHUN said.


As for 'positive pressure' inside a case, the only advantage positive presure give is stopping dust from leaking in.
Our case fans make very, very little pressure.
To put it into perspective, most case fans make less than 1.836mm H2O of static pressure. 'Static pressure' is how much higher the pressure that a fan running at full speed can push into a sealed container than out side of container. That is about the same as the pressure difference on our feet compared to the pressure of air on our neck/chest standing at sea level wiggling our toes in the sea. That's not much pressure. Air pressure at sea level is 1.836mm H2O more than at 5 feet above sea level. Very few case fans have ratings of 1.836mm H2O, and we don't run our case fans at full speed .. or into sealed cases.

A case with 3x of the same140mm fans with 2x as front intakes and 1x as rear exhaust is enough to keep dust out .. assuming intakes are filtered.

If case has air flowing thru it, it will likey wiggle paper over exhaust vent.
 

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What TeslaHUN said.


As for 'positive pressure' inside a case, the only advantage positive presure give is stopping dust from leaking in.
Our case fans make very, very little pressure.
To put it into perspective, most case fans make less than 1.836mm H2O of static pressure. 'Static pressure' is how much higher the pressure that a fan running at full speed can push into a sealed container than out side of container. That is about the same as the pressure difference on our feet compared to the pressure of air on our neck/chest standing at sea level wiggling our toes in the sea. That's not much pressure. Air pressure at sea level is 1.836mm H2O more than at 5 feet above sea level. Very few case fans have ratings of 1.836mm H2O, and we don't run our case fans at full speed .. or into sealed cases.

A case with 3x of the same140mm fans with 2x as front intakes and 1x as rear exhaust is enough to keep dust out .. assuming intakes are filtered.

If case has air flowing thru it, it will likey wiggle paper over exhaust vent.
well thats cool to know, my thinking was that forcing out forces heat out every little crevice helpingheat to escape like so.

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I rarely use case exhaust fans. Case airflow is similar to cooler or radiator; using both intake and exhaust fans is basically stacking fans, same as push/pull on cooler or rad. Intake fans moving air into case causes air to flow on thru and out of case. Push/pull sometimes increases airflow because it increase pressure, thus overcoming resistance to airflow giving us more airflow. Increasing intake fan speed by 100rpm increases flow easily matching push/pull fans.

Sometimes using an exhaust will help create a air flow path different than no exhaust fan and thus give better cooling in that area.

Often removing PCIe slot covers improves front to back flow below GPU thus lower air temp entering GPU so it runs cooler.

But it's hard to accurately predict what airflow will do. I use a couple cheap digital indoor/outdoor thermometer and/or digital fridge/terrarium thermometers and set their remote sensors in front of / over components where I want good cooling to monitor air temp cooling components rather than just monitoring component temp. If air is less than 3c warmer than room at full load is very good. 5-6c is not bad in hard working system, but I like to keep air 3c or less warmer than room. I've found component temps run almost exactly 1:1 ratio to air temp cooling them at same load and fan speed. So if air over component is 15c warmer than room and component is 85c and we lower air temp to 4c warmer than room component temp will be about 75c. Again, that's at same fan speed and component load.

The smoother air flows thru case and the less turbulence we have to better airflow will be and to cooler / quieter system will be. Sometimes lowering fan speed will improve temps by smoothing out airflow. ;)

Case grills reduce airflow 20-80%. Filters are even worse. So running with on filters and grills generally makes a huge difference.
 

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Just be careful. Faster airflow thru case usually creates more turbulence so more cool air mixing with heated air before reaching coolers / heatsinks. Again, this is why I use remote sensor thermometers to monitor air temp reaching components. ;)
 
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