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just keep your temps really low. around 55c. it doesn't matter how much voltage you really put to it as long as it stays cool.
 

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Originally Posted by mudd
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just keep your temps really low. around 55c. it doesn't matter how much voltage you really put to it as long as it stays cool.

I know that to be untrue. The MOSFETs can only handle so much voltage.
 

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Originally Posted by amped
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I know that to be untrue. The MOSFETs can only handle so much voltage.

i've given my old 3500+ 1.68v on air.......... way more than it really needs to overclock.

plus when you start doing more extreme overclocking you really put the juice to it....... talking volt modding your board for 1.7+vcore
 

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Wow Yea my 3200 Overclocked on my stock lapped cooler with AS5 never go's above 50 Thats on 1.55 voltz

My board dos max 1.55 is there a mod to fix this cause im picking up a opy 165 next week.
 

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Quote:


just keep your temps really low. around 55c. it doesn't matter how much voltage you really put to it as long as it stays cool.

well as a guide line peoples say 1.55v...but yea even though your temps dont go above 55c, pushing really high voltage through your cpu decreases its life dramatically....i mean ive got 1.75v going through my cpu with a BT and the highest it ever sees is 38C..thats not to say that i can pump even more voltage through it like 1.9v or something..even now my cpu life is most likely decreased alot..although ive had it like this nearly a year now...BUT remember im not saying go and set ur vcore to 1.75v...1.55v is the highest people say.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by mudd
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just keep your temps really low. around 55c. it doesn't matter how much voltage you really put to it as long as it stays cool.

I would have to disagree with you there.

The reason CPU's tend to fail is due to electron migration. Voltage is the flow of electrons from a point of high concentration to a low concentration. As the electrons pass through the CPU core they travel through lanes. As the voltage is increased the force that these electrons have is increased. With increased energy they bombard the pathways slowly etching until they break through the lane and into an adjacent lane causing failure of this section of the core architecture. If this happens sufficiently you get total failure of the CPU. This is electron migration.

The temperature also has a similar effect. With increasing temperature the electrons gain extra momentum giving a similar effect as stated above but also can lead to physical scorching of the core and die.

This is why for instance, sudden northwood death syndrome (SNDS) happens on the older Intel cpus (and others in fact).
You can have great temperatures but if the volts are too high that can kill it also. (I know this from personal experience)

Therefore to summarise it is a combination of voltage and temperature that effect the the lifespan of a CPU.
 

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Originally Posted by MjrTom
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I would have to disagree with you there.

The reason CPU's tend to fail is due to electron migration. Voltage is the flow of electrons from a point of high concentration to a low concentration. As the electrons pass through the CPU core they travel through lanes. As the voltage is increased the force that these electrons have is increased. With increased energy they bombard the pathways slowly etching until they break through the lane and into an adjacent lane causing failure of this section of the core architecture. If this happens sufficiently you get total failure of the CPU this is electron migration.

The temperature also has a similar effect. With increaseing temperature the electrons gain extra momentum giving a similar effect as stated above but also can lead to physical scorching of the core and die.

This is why for instance, sudden northwood death syndrome (SNDS) happens on the older Intel cpus (and others in fact) you can have great temperatures but if the volts are too high that can kill it also. (I know this from personal experience)

Therefore to summarise it is a combination of voltage and temperature that effect the the lifespan of a CPU.


Correct.... You cannot simply apply a lot of voltage and assume everything is fine because temps are low.
 
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Thanks.

I would say to keep it below 1.55v if you are air cooling.
 

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Well I would say 1.6 For Air cooling since your CPU is .90nm but for me, 1.8v is better because I have 1.30nm core and the stock voltage is more
 

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For any 90nm dual core I wouldn't go above 1.55V, and even that is pushing it. These chips get a lot hotter than single cores, so even running with stock voltages will give you high temps. Also, it's not only the temp. on the CPU that you have to worry about; as said earlier, the MOSFETs can only take so much voltage (and heat) before crapping out.
 

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If I can get my computer to last like 3 years on 1.55V, I'm not gonna worry about it much.
 

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Originally Posted by beret9987 View Post
If I can get my computer to last like 3 years on 1.55V, I'm not gonna worry about it much.

Well, my old sktA CPUs still work after 4 years and they remain overclocked with 1.7V running through them. My very first skt939 Venice still runs after 2 years of having 1.6V in it. Of course those are with extreme air (Tornadoes and other Thermaltake high speed fans) so keeping things cool does help a lot.
I always envision dual cores as being more delicate compared to single cores, so I never go past 1.55V. But as said before, watch your MB temps. too; my CPU is rather cool now with my WC, but because I now don't have the extra fan from my SI-120 blowing on the MOFSETs, my MB temp. is like 60*C (and it's Winter now), so I may have to reduce my OC even though my CPU rarely passes 46*C.
 

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Yeah those mosfets get very warm (similar mobo also got SI-120) mine runs at around 45*C
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by MjrTom
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Yeah those mosfets get very warm (similar mobo also got SI-120) mine runs at around 45*C


That was the temp. on mine. Now I only have the side panel fan blowing on the board, and even that will have to come off eventually because I can barely close my case with all those tubes. I may put some extra heatsinks somewhere in there, but I doubt that will be of much help.
 
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