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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok when i was overclocking my Phenom II x4 955 i had the Voltage at 1.35V from 1.4V stock (CPU-Z says 1.296) and the speed at 3.6 from 3.2 stock. Anyway, when i was overclocking at that speed i ran a stability test on AMD Overdrive and it crashed. Im assuming this is because the voltage is too low for the clock speed. Then when i restarted and ran it again it just kept saying "AOD is not responding". I turned down the clock to 3.5 and now the stability seems 100% good atm while im running the stability test as i type this. Anyone else think that the voltage was the issue there? If not then what else do you think went wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Using Prime95 i got up to 61C max then it seemed to level at 60C. Is this temp too high for my chip? Ive read around that about 58C is max recommended but this program seems to really burn the chip more then any other program i have found.
 

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with P95 on the maximum heat test (small fft's) I would say safe is <65 C

If you didn't know already, P95 also allows for different types of torture tests, even custom made ones.

small fft's will produce maximum heat, where large fft's test more NB/RAM stability than the small fft test. Then ofc there is a blend, which tests some of both.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the help with this rock
+1 rep for you lol.
 

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You need better cooling to overclock, get a cheap Hyper 212+. Make sure you are looking at "Core Temp" and keep it under 62C and 60C for extended periods. "CPU Temp" is read from the sensor in the socket and tends to read 7-10C higher than actual temp under load and at peak temps. See my guide for more information:

AMD Temp Information and Guide

And yes, to answer your main question. You need more voltage to be stable at higher overclocks. Every chip is different and will require different voltages for set clocks - you must find what yours needs. Increasing the voltage does increase heat and therefore increases temps, so you still need better cooling if you plan to overclock higher.
 
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