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What happened is that I left the computer to defragment over night and left for work but in the morning when I tried to start the computer it got past the post but stopped at after that and could not load the OS, so I restarted the computer thinking that something happened while defraging and I have already had the windows 7 disc in my hand when it failed to post. Then it wouldnt even display anything on the monitor just everything started spinning up and suddenly stopped and went into a loop of restarting. After that I removed everything unplugged everything hard drives, optical drives, front panel connectors and took out the graphics card placed it back in same thing, then took it out again and cleared the cmos, placed the GPU back in and same thing, after about 7-9 restarts(also was switching the ram around) it finnally posted but with one memory module then tried it with 2 it posted without a problem. I would also like to note that I had a mild overclock of 4Ghz on te CPU and no overclock on the GPU. Is this a common issue with sandy bridge boards? Now I am
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from the computer thinkin that I turn it off and doesnt come back on. Also noticed theres a new bios the F3 for my board, I would appreciate some input whether I should flash the bios to that or whether is good or bad.

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It is a very common problem with gigabyte p67 boards... i experienced it myself... update to the latest bios and sync your bios's by pressing alt-f12 during post.. it will ask you if you want to copy your bios etc.. if done correctly... next time it happens or if it ever happens just clear your cmos... it should be able to boot then, no need to take everything out

The current bios... f3 seems to be alot better.. i just flashed today

EDIT: you didn't buy your motherboard from superbiiz did you?
 

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After you've updated the BIOS, you will need to do the following, depending on which program you used to update.

This is VERY important!!

If you used FLASHSPI to update, then after the flash is completely done, POWER OFF the computer, without restarting it. Then turn off the PSU switch so all the lights on the board go out, then clear the CMOS (instructions are in your manual) by moving the clear cmos jumper to the "Clear" position for 30 seconds, then move it back to the default position.

If you used @bios or another program that automatically restarts the computer, let it restart and then go into your BIOS. Once you're fully in, then power off the computer, and repeat the clear CMOS instructions again.

Then power the computer back on, go into your BIOS, set your favorite settings, make sure to disable stuff you don't need (like the 1394 chip, and the Azilea sound chip if you don't use the onboard sound (Otherwise keep it at auto)), press CONTROL-F1 while you're on the main screen to unlock spread sprectrum (it's recommended to turn SS off) and PCI latency, set your settings, save and exit. BTW it's HIGHLY recommended you go to advanced options and TURN OFF the full screen logo! That logo is best for a computer being run by grandma or something :/

When your computer restarts, BEFORE the CPU ID string appears at the top.
hold down ALT and F12, and hold it down until you see the computer "Freeze" at the CPUID screen with the RAM count. If it stops at the RAM count, then it should load the backup tool and will copy the main bios to the backup BIOS.

Copying main to backup makes the board much more stable and far less likely to say overclock failed and try to restore the backup back over the main.

Hope this helps you some.

If you ALREADY updated (and you probably did), its STILL best to clear the CMOS anyway, even if you updated hours ago. There are issues that can happen if you don't clear the CMOS after a major BIOS change. Issues that are hard to find, like options being whacked or your PCIE suddenly running at X8...
 

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Ok, if the cmos jumper ONLY has 2 pins, then shorting both pins clears the cmos, and leaving it open is normal operation. In this case you can just cover one of the jumper pins with the jumper (aka overhang) which leaves the other one clear. Most boards I used before had 3 pins, and the "first" pin was actually a dummy pin (not required to have the block on, just used for jumper storage so the jumper won't fall off, etc).

The jumper block is probably somewhere in the box, as I've never seen a board with only two jumper pins for clear cmos. There's usually been a third, and the jumper block is covering pins 1 and 2 by default.

So if it's a 3 pin setup, 1-2 are normal operation, and 2-3 is the clear. (only 2 and 3 are responsible for clearing). If it's two pin, then removing the jumper or havig it overhang 1 pin is normal operation.
 
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