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Linux Evangelist
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Discussion Starter #1
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Direct3D 10 is now supported by DXVK in addition to Direct3D 11. The approach used by DXVK is similar to DXUP in that it's a wrapper around the Direct3D 11 interfaces. This wrapper is enough to get D3D10-running games like Crysis working atop this Vulkan acceleration along with games like Assassin's Creed 1.
DXVK is now up to version 0.65 and is an absolute gift to Linux gamers.
 

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Linux Evangelist
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Discussion Starter #4

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Registered
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Just run Windows... but I'm glad people are doing this sort of thing.
 

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Linux Evangelist
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Discussion Starter #6
Just run Windows... but I'm glad people are doing this sort of thing.
I can't. I would have to STEAL it and become a PIRATE. Wouldn't want that.

WINE by itself is a miracle(just how many Linux programs do you see running on Windows? Exactly.), but DXVK is just plain a dammed gift. Eventually the entire Windows Steam catalog will work with it, and half of the currently unplayable stuff will go completely unnoticed for quite some time before something thinks to install them just for the heck of it and find out that they run now, and nobody is going to know how many updates it's been that way.

Like Sleeping Dogs. I bought it years ago, AND the Definitive Edition, never got around to playing it, kinda want to. For some reason the regular game runs awfully and the Definitive version doesn't run at all, so now that I've got the free time I can't play it. Oh, well. Just bought Arkham Knight+Season Pass for $10 and I understand that the entire Arkham series runs on wine just fine. I wish Feral could pick up a contract to port it since they did the Mac versions, but oh well. Waiting on my new rig, whether that be budget Ryzen2 2600 or $3000 Threadripper2 2950x, I'm getting one or the other by end of year. By middle of next year I'm betting AMD will have it's fully cooked version of Vega out and we'll finally see a proper competitor to NVIDIA, budget winner if not performance leader. Then I'll pick a graphics card.
 

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Crayon Evangelist
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just how many Linux programs do you see running on Windows?

You can bash native in W10. You can even run unity.



google "windows subsystem for linux"
 

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Linux Evangelist
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Discussion Starter #8

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Just run Windows... but I'm glad people are doing this sort of thing.
When complicated internal combustion engines then automobiles were being invented, I'm sure there was a guy saying "Just ride a horse, looks how easy it is!" Now look how much harder it is to ride a horse than to drive a car, there isn't even a good watering hole between my house and work!
With Windows 7 I can see why people might not want to push for Linux but after what I've dealt with using 10 just about anything looks better.
 

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Linux Evangelist
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Discussion Starter #11
Now for better Linux Graphics Drivers!
This is actually kind of the cool part. NVIDIA open source drivers suck. Noveau is almost useless.... thanks to NVIDIA making sure not to give the volunteer devs the info that they need. This would be okay if their Linux drivers were on par with their Windows drivers, which of course they aren't. The base performance is there but none of the bells and whistles Windows gamers take for granted. Meanwhile at AMD.....

AMD's open source drivers are actually pretty good with performance on par with their Windows proprietary drivers. In fact they are so good that only workstation applications will benefit from using the proprietary drivers because of some specific optimizations by AMD for the enterprise sector. Oh, and AMD's cards still seem to run better with DX12/Vulkan than NVIDIA's stuff, for what that's worth. Not saying a Vega64 can beat a 1080ti, just that the Vega handles the newer API better last I checked.

We have this dynamic being set up in the computing world big picture - NVIDIA/INTEL/MICROSOFT form the Unholy Trinity based around brute force clock speeds and locking customers into their ecosystems. Meanwhile AMD is over here providing hardware like Threadripper that just kills it with multi-threaded tasks(many hands make light work), plays nice with Linux/FOSS, and is pushing open standards like Vulkan and Freesync. Two completely divergent paths to go down.

Your choice, a gilded cage or an open field where things don't always work at first, but they get there eventually.
 

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PC Evangelist
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When complicated internal combustion engines then automobiles were being invented, I'm sure there was a guy saying "Just ride a horse, looks how easy it is!" Now look how much harder it is to ride a horse than to drive a car, there isn't even a good watering hole between my house and work!
With Windows 7 I can see why people might not want to push for Linux but after what I've dealt with using 10 just about anything looks better.
Nope. This is like trying to put wheels on horse legs.
 

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Volt addicted OC fanatic
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We have this dynamic being set up in the computing world big picture - NVIDIA/INTEL/MICROSOFT form the Unholy Trinity based around brute force clock speeds and locking customers into their ecosystems. Meanwhile AMD is over here providing hardware like
Intel actually has some of the best driver support for Linux, bug-free open source drivers that perform like they do in Windows for all their hardware. Nvidia doesn't have good open source drivers (because of idiots in that company) and AMD doesn't have bug-free drivers. (Ever try to run a Ryzen APU in Linux? When I did that, it was a bug nightmare.)

I'm wondering if that will continue for their discrete cards, if so, it might be a good idea to get an Intel GPU when they release those in 2020 for Linux.
 

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Linux Evangelist
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Discussion Starter #14
Intel actually has some of the best driver support for Linux, bug-free open source drivers that perform like they do in Windows for all their hardware. Nvidia doesn't have good open source drivers (because of idiots in that company) and AMD doesn't have bug-free drivers. (Ever try to run a Ryzen APU in Linux? When I did that, it was a bug nightmare.)

I'm wondering if that will continue for their discrete cards, if so, it might be a good idea to get an Intel GPU when they release those in 2020 for Linux.
Intel is more of a free agent in this, granted. They don't care what the OS is as long as it's running an Intel CPU on an Intel motherboard that you pay an Intel tax for. I really would not bet on that GPU being any good. Sure, the drivers might work great, but then they would great for my Intel laptop and I can't even run Cura 3 on the integrated graphics. Even some non-3D games don't display correctly in the menus. About the only possible bright spot in this is that AMD and NVIDIA are both finally talking about real time ray tracing with a single graphics card where ten years ago you had to have multiples of two just to get a playable frame rate on Quake 4. Intel; has been playing with that specifically for ten+ years so maybe they know something the other guys don't.
 

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Otherworlder
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speaking of linux, any linux flavor recommendation for an old grandma thats no good with complex stuff?
i'm thinking robolinux, but the nagware might cause problems.
 

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Premium Member
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The Intel Linux driver is actually better than the Windows one. Both for compatibility and performance. The problem with AMD drivers and "bugs" is that the open source devs stick strictly to the OpenGL spec. and a lot of games implement hacks and workarounds in their code that often breaks said specs. (why we have compat. profiles in OpenGL).
 

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Linux Evangelist
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Discussion Starter #17
speaking of linux, any linux flavor recommendation for an old grandma thats no good with complex stuff?
i'm thinking robolinux, but the nagware might cause problems.
Mint Cinnamon is probably the closest you get to Windows. You can do anything you need to do day to day in the GUI.
 

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Networking Nut
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speaking of linux, any linux flavor recommendation for an old grandma thats no good with complex stuff?
i'm thinking robolinux, but the nagware might cause problems.
What I would recommend to anybody who has little to no Linux experience would be Linux Mint running the Cinnamon desktop. In fact, that would be my go to distribution for any elderly person who has almost no computer experience whatsoever. I have supported an elderly woman who had simple needs and I went down the Mint road with her over Windows because of the ease of use. She's a breeze to support, too.
 

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Z-80 > i9
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Just run Windows... but I'm glad people are doing this sort of thing.
Why? Wine, especially with galliumnine and DXVK is becoming an increasingly good option for Windows games under Linux. I'm really hopeful that the whole thing with wine integration into Steam is true and works out nicely, because that alone (If they do something that allows auto-configuration for games that have a good profile and uploading your configuration for games, too) could turn Linux into a serious option for gaming. You'd be able to play most of your Windows games, have better support for retro games, better/faster drivers on AMD and the other benefits Linux can bring quite easily. Depending on how well wine and the other projects go in the near future, you could even have the benefit of faster performance for some games at least. That's already true for The Sims 3.

I mean, don't get me wrong, something written natively is the best possible solution but given the stuff we know, wine support and devs using an API natively on Linux such as Vulkan will provide a great experience, as does devs keeping the graphics simple shown by Doom and various other OpenGL games over the years or other games that have a weird bottleneck (eg. The Sims 3 with its hard I/O bottleneck whenever it actually performs inadequately even on an SSD) and you've gotta remember, that's how Microsoft managed to get Windows a foothold in the market at all: By offering support for all your DOS programs, even if some areas weren't quite as good as native and some areas were improved over native. I couldn't care less about what OS people use, but I do care about the increased support from Linux even having a 10% marketshare that would make for a vastly better user experience across the board.

Intel actually has some of the best driver support for Linux, bug-free open source drivers that perform like they do in Windows for all their hardware. Nvidia doesn't have good open source drivers (because of idiots in that company) and AMD doesn't have bug-free drivers. (Ever try to run a Ryzen APU in Linux? When I did that, it was a bug nightmare.)

I'm wondering if that will continue for their discrete cards, if so, it might be a good idea to get an Intel GPU when they release those in 2020 for Linux.
It might, it might not. Intel basically open sourced driver development because they never needed to worry about competition perse, they had their own market with their IGPs and having the open source driver provided the best way for great support while not having to spend a lot on development. Hopefully they see what AMD has going for them and decide to do the same thing with their high-end GPUs, it'd make for great PR and put even more pressure on nVidia to start opening up.

That's the thing with open source oriented development especially when the actual company provided backend is kinda small as with AMD and its on a low importance platform like Linux, support can take longer to actually be worked in fully than the product does to release simply because that's when the majority of the programmers get access to the hardware. Ryzen APUs have better support now and the real benefit of open source drivers comes into play now, faster updates, patches as long as the hardware still has people using it, people figuring out interesting things with the hardware that can possibly offer new features or the like. I'm fairly sure that the open source radeon driver even has basic support for the APU in the PS4 thanks to the homebrew community getting Linux to boot on the PS4, too or at least there's a patched version of the driver floating around.
 

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Volt addicted OC fanatic
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I'm fairly sure that the open source radeon driver even has basic support for the APU in the PS4 thanks to the homebrew community getting Linux to boot on the PS4, too or at least there's a patched version of the driver floating around.
I should point out that the APU in the PS4 is substantially different than the Ryzen APUs, both its CPU is different (based on Bulldozer but refined compared to the 32nm ones they gave to the desktop for so many years), and the GPU is several generations different (about a HD 7850) than the Vega stuff in the Ryzen APU, which is really a cross between Vega and Polaris, with a one-CCX quad-core Ryzen CPU in it.
 
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