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Hello, Im saved enough money so its about time to upgrade my 5yrs old pc, going from air to water. Its my 1st time doing it so I need some assurance that my loops run correctly. I plan to run 2 loop seperately 1 loop for GPU and the other for CPU+Mobo.

For CPU and Mobo i have one 360rad and one 240rad: Res -> Pump -> 360rad -> CPU -> 240rad -> Mosfets/Chipset -> Res

For GPU i have one 480rad and two 1080ti: Res -> Pump -> Rad -> GPUs -> Res

Is it good idea to use 4 pumps, one dual pump for each loop? for redundancy in case if one was to stop working

Thank you!
 

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As long as you have res above pump, nothing else really matters. Both loops should work without any negative impact from flow order. Secondary pumps in each loop are far from necessary.

Good luck!
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Any reason why you use 2 separate loops? I use dual pumps in my setups but your setup would require 4 which is expensive.

There have been many discussions about loop order and the outcome has always been that the loop order does not matter as long as you can remove air and feed the pump as inedenimadam mentions.

The finer points of loop order come down to how easy the loop will be to fill and drain. I usually draw mine out on paper a few times before I start cutting tubing.

Good luck

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One thing I'd like to point out is loop shape vertically.
Perfect circle: you can bleed and drain w/o tilting.
If one is above another when going down vise versa, all the fluid gets trapped
 

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4 pumps is a bit overkill lol you will be fine with 1 in each loop. I would go for a D5 if space isn't a requirement for each loop, as stated above order of the loop doesn't matter just have the pump pull directly from the res
 

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Agreed, also if silence is a goal - 4 pumps will make that hard to achieve (couple thousand rpms x4 will be loud). Put your reservoirs in the highest points of your loop, either fixed to the case or easily removable to get to that point - it will help you bleed the air out of the system faster.

I'm all for redundancy, but you can set your system to shut down if it detects 0 rpms on your pump - speedfan can send you an email of that. That said, I'm having trouble getting SpeedFan alerts to work properly, but I know it is possible.
 

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I'd suggest using PWM pumps (if you hadn't already decided on that). That way you can run them at slow speeds most of the time only ramping up to higher speeds when the system is under load. Mine are extremely quiet all the time because they only need to run at 38% max to get a good flow rate. Most of the time they're at around 1700rpm and have been running for just over 6 years.

With the amount of rads you have a single loop would be make better use of them.

You can use Real Temp, if it works with your CPU, to run a bat file to shutdown if the temps exceed a specified temperature.

The bat file just needs the following to work:

shutdown.exe -s -f -t 00
 
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