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Our world is full of integrated semiconductor circuits, commonly known as microchips. Today you find them in computers, cars, mobile phones and in almost every electrical device. Technology from ESA?s XMM-Newton space telescope will make these chips much smaller, faster and cheaper.

The circuits are etched into today’s microchips by ultraviolet light.

The demand for faster and more powerful chips requires the use of extreme ultraviolet (EUV). Much smaller semiconductor circuits can be produced, leading to microchips up to 100 times faster and to memory chips with up to 100 times more storage capacity.

However, conventional lenses cannot focus EUV rays. Instead, special ‘grazing-incidence mirrors’ must be used, and it is here that space technology comes in.

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“After the successful production of the X-ray telescope for ESA’s XMM-Newton spacecraft, Media Lario continued to extend the technology and searched for advanced applications and markets for this unique capability,†explains Giovanni Nocerino, Media Lario President and CEO.

“Advanced EUV lithography for chip production needed an efficient mechanism for collecting and transporting the EUV light. A unique Media Lario design, which is the ‘microscope’ configuration of the space telescope, turned out to be an ideal solution for the EUV collector problem for lithography.â€

“The great news is that the semiconductor equipment industry, and consequently semiconductor devices, are making a significant transition to EUV lithography and Media Lario's gracing incidence collector mirror is a key-enabling subsystem of this transition.â€
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Telescopes have a long history of practical application. Just ask Galilaeo.
 

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In a van...DOWNBYTHERIVER
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I thought we have pretty much hit the limit in regards to temperature; so why would this matter? Surely smaller size = less temp, but will it be that significant?
 

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Originally Posted by lkegley9
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From what I have seen, smaller circuits lead to a drop in temps, so the smaller we get, the less temperature is generated. If we have a 0.14nm chip, then it should run cooler than today's 32nm's. Or at least it should.

I think they'd call it 140 pm (picometer)

but on topic, I can't wait to see 200Ghz hectacore processors, software needs to catch up even faster if that happens
 
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