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In a van...DOWNBYTHERIVER
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Discussion Starter #1
Is this possible? I just moved and my new place has 1.5Mbps DSL from CenturyLink (I know... kill me now) but the router can't seem to penetrate the 2 outer walls it needs to very well, and it would appear my laptop's adapter isn't suitable (My 360 works relatively well on the other hand) so I was wondering if I could use an old router directly attached to my laptop to boost the strength. (I'm sure it's a helluva lot more powerful than the adapter in my laptop currently)
 

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Not sure what type of brand/model routers you have but if they both support DD-WRT, you can setup a "Client Bridge" so that your old router picks up the signal from the other, and creates a connection via the LAN ports on the back of the old router.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madman340 View Post

kill me now
This is probably your most viable option.

No but seriously, you have to use wifi for everything? I would hang myself
 

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If it supports DD-WRT you can use 'client' or 'bridge' mode depending on what kind of link you want to use. This would provide the wired LAN interfaces connectivity through the wireless uplink.

Are there any elevation differences between the two points?
 

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In a van...DOWNBYTHERIVER
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Discussion Starter #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by latelesley View Post

if the old router can act as a wireless client or bridge, you should be able to do that. Not all routers can do that though.

Have you thought about picking up a new wireless card for inside the lappy? Thats what I tend to do if they have crap wireless.
The adapter is embedded in the laptop, and there are no extra USB ports. (Even then, I've used a 'good' USB network card, and it was really damn spotty)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheesezilla View Post

Not sure what type of brand/model routers you have but if they both support DD-WRT, you can setup a "Client Bridge" so that your old router picks up the signal from the other, and creates a connection via the LAN ports on the back of the old router.
The old router I have is a Netgear WNR834B v2.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorpion667 View Post

This is probably your most viable option.

No but seriously, you have to use wifi for everything? I would hang myself
I prefer wired, but when the situation is limiting, I sometimes have to grin and bear it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by beers View Post

If it supports DD-WRT you can use 'client' or 'bridge' mode depending on what kind of link you want to use. This would provide the wired LAN interfaces connectivity through the wireless uplink.

Are there any elevation differences between the two points?
It's funny you should mention that. Currently my laptop is hovering above my head near a window in an attempt to reduce the interference from what I imagine is a thick metal plate or concrete in the outer wall. I also have the router elevated as much as it will go, but it still has to go through 2 walls. In terms of location it really is not very far at all, something is real thick in these walls...

I'm definitely going to look in to DD-WRT as a solution. My router is supported.
 

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In a van...DOWNBYTHERIVER
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Discussion Starter #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by beers View Post

If it supports DD-WRT you can use 'client' or 'bridge' mode depending on what kind of link you want to use. This would provide the wired LAN interfaces connectivity through the wireless uplink.

Are there any elevation differences between the two points?
I want to use it as a replacement for the adapter in my laptop - so I guess a client?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madman340 View Post

I want to use it as a replacement for the adapter in my laptop - so I guess a client?
Client mode applies the firewall and NAT, treating your wireless link as a WAN connection.
Bridge mode extends your broadcast domain, treating your wireless uplink as a switched uplink.

Therefore, if you were trying to jack someone else's wifi, I'd suggest the former. In this case, the latter would probably give you a more reasonable experience.
 
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