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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Would it be ok to use one of these NA-SAC5 to power an AIO pump instead of connecting the pump to a motherboard header or should I use a controller for this purpose
I intend to run the pump at 100% regardless so losing pwm control doesn't matter
2487864
 

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no SATA to PWM adapter will "require" you to plug it into the motherboard. those adapters you're seeing are so you don't lose the ability to control the fan, it's taking the sens pin and giving it to the motherboard and using SATA for power. those still work without plugging it into the motherboard but it'd run at 100%.

if it's just to troubleshoot then get the cheapest? you asked for an adapter and then asked if you should buy a fan controller, so not really sure what you're after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
What I meant is to ask if its ok to use that simple Sata to 4 pin cable I posted a picture of or should I use a controller, I just wasn't aware that any controller wouldn't need to be plugged into the motherboard.

I'm just going to order the cable, I can't imagine why it shouldn't work.
 

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If you use the adapter, the pump will run 100% all the time, and you will not have the ability to read RPM.
If you connect to MB header, you may be able to control speed depending on your mobo's capabilities. You will be able to see RPM. However, some pumps may exceed the power limits some MB fan headers can provide, so make sure to check.
You may also be able to find an adapter where the power is taken from PSU but the RPM sense is available to the motherboard. This was you can monitor the pump in Windows. Here's one such molex adapter, where red and black are from PSU and yellow sense wire plugs into MB:
 

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Would it be ok to use one of these NA-SAC5 to power an AIO pump instead of connecting the pump to a motherboard header or should I use a controller for this purpose
I intend to run the pump at 100% regardless so losing pwm control doesn't matter
View attachment 2487864
I would use a molex if possible because I've had a few sata power connectors burn out with medium loads.
This is the cable I used for my pump because I could source it locally and control the speed from a motherboard fan header
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
There's a misunderstanding here.. Im aware of the things I won't get with the cable.. im deliberately not plugging the pump into a motherboard header.
I've had issues with this boards headers(even the water pump headers) not always powering the pump on when I turn the system on.
And it's an AIO pump, afaik they're intended to be run at 100% so that's unimportant to me.

My concern is simply power related, idk whether a sata to 4 pin cable intended for fans will be sufficient for an AIO pump, and whether or not the fact that the pump is designed to be plugged into a PWM header might not like it.

Let me try to clarify a bit.
Motherboard is an X570 Aorus Pro Wifi. X570 AORUS PRO WIFI (rev. 1.0) Key Features | Motherboard - GIGABYTE Australia
AIO is an EK 360 D-RGB. EK-AIO 360 D-RGB
the motherboard has had strange issues with its fan headers throughout its whole life and yes I tried both the CPU, CPU_OPT and every specifically designated water pump header(Technically aorus marketing claims all of them are capable), a lot of aorus x570 owners at the start found that noctua fans just wouldn't turn on at all on these boards, now the behaviour is back but with my AIO pump.
So what Im after here is a permanent, simple and cheap workaround that removes the motherboard from the equation entirely because its pwm signalling cant be trusted.
Some days the pump won't turn on at all, others it gets stuck at a low RPM and some days it works perfectly fine, and then other days it takes a few minutes to turn on after the system is turned on and then works fine again. This is the same behaviour I got when i had noctua fans plugged into these headers so Im confident its the board itself and not the pump.. especially because the pump runs perfectly every time plugged into my brothers asrock board.

After all that I finally found EKs spec sheet for the pump, its supposedly only 0.65A.
I very much doubt 7.8 watts is too much for a SATA cable, so my last concern is just whether or not a pump designed to take a PWM signal will be ok without it.

Anyway it doesn't matter, i've ordered the cable. Im pretty sure after a lot of googling that there should be no issues. Ill get a proper controller in a year or two for the sake of monitoring the pump speed in case it starts to die, for now though it's only about 6 months old and im not concerned about needing to monitor it.. assuming the cable does its job and runs it at 100% all the time.
 

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Well the SATA connector has 3 12v lines, each capable of 1.5A so a total of 4.5A. Just one of those lines should provide enough current for your pump. Seeing as it is Noctua intended for high-amp fans, it should be fine.

If it is a PWM issue, there are a couple of ways of taking PWM out of the equation without resorting to an adapter. Did you try setting the header to be DC isntead of PWM in the BIOS? This should assure the pump runs full speed. Or, if one of those headers is DC 3 pin (even if it is a 3 pin DC masquerading as a 4-pin) try plug it into that.
 
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You will not have any issues with that adapter. 0.65a is very little in the fan/pump world. Most MB headers can handle 1A easily, some claim to handle 2A.
In the meantime, look at the fan curve setup for the motherboard. For the header powering the pump, turn off any fan feature and have it run at 100% in DC mode. I'm not familiar with that mobo's naming, but hopefully you get the just of it - turn off any fan control, basically.
For PWM fans, a thing about PWM is that fans won't run at all if PWM is set below fan minimum. For some fans, it's 30%, for some it's 40%. If the fan curve is set to start at 25% and the fan won't spin up below 30%, then the fan... won't spin up until temps rise and the curve goes above 30%. Not sure if this is your issue, but I've seen a lot of issues with this sort of thing.
I've got Corsair Commander for my fans, and that thing is pretty clever being an aftermarket solution. It will monitor fan RPM and will not lower the PWM below fan minimum, whereas dumber logic you get with MB will. So even if I purposefully set Corsair curve below the fan minimum, the Commander will keep the fan spinning at the lowest PWM the fan will take to stay spinning.
I've tried multiple MB vendors and their fan control crap and was never happy until I finally bit the bullet and got the Corsair Commander, and it far exceeded my expectations and works flawlessly.
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You can use the motherboard headers but disable PWM control in the BIOS. There´s no reason for that not to work.
Do you mean changing it to DC? is that ok for a PWM pump?
I can't see anything for specifically turning off PWM control, just the option to choose between DC and PWM and then obviously the speed controls and presets, where I've always had it set to "full speed" for the pump.
 

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Yes. With DC the pwm signal will not be sent and it will run it @ 100% if you have it set for 100% (if you set it to less than 100 it will lower the voltage to the pump to reduce the rpm, which you don't want). Like I said.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok well I guess I wasted $9. Changing it to DC seems to have worked, tried multiple restarts and cold boots and it hasn't yet failed to start with the system. Still I guess it might be worth having the cable around just in case the issue comes back for some reason.

Thanks for all your help everyone. I wish I'd bothered to try any of this before I spent $130 on an air cooler.. but I suppose there are worse things than having a spare NH-U9s around to use instead of a stock cooler should the liquid cooler ever die.
 

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Ok well I guess I wasted $9. Changing it to DC seems to have worked, tried multiple restarts and cold boots and it hasn't yet failed to start with the system. Still I guess it might be worth having the cable around just in case the issue comes back for some reason.

Thanks for all your help everyone. I wish I'd bothered to try any of this before I spent $130 on an air cooler.. but I suppose there are worse things than having a spare NH-U9s around to use instead of a stock cooler should the liquid cooler ever die.
Good thing you sorted it out.
 

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Ok well I guess I wasted $9. Changing it to DC seems to have worked, tried multiple restarts and cold boots and it hasn't yet failed to start with the system. Still I guess it might be worth having the cable around just in case the issue comes back for some reason.

Thanks for all your help everyone. I wish I'd bothered to try any of this before I spent $130 on an air cooler.. but I suppose there are worse things than having a spare NH-U9s around to use instead of a stock cooler should the liquid cooler ever die.
It is always good to learn something new! I have my old NH-D15 waiting in the wing in case of pump failure. Backups are good.
 
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