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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by glycerin256 View Post
quick question about types of oil. im not a professional oiler or anything, so here goes.

would motor oil work? like some regular 10-30? what about synthetic vs regular motor oil?

ivs heard that mineral oil works too, any thoughts?

hair clipper oil . . .
Hiar clipper oil ought to be right on the money.

I honestly don't really know about motor oil, but I suspect it would be fine.

As for mineral oil, I'd have to look it up. I've had mineral oil on my hands, but I wouldn't put it in a fan.
 

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I'll throw my .02 Regular 30wt low ash oil(like used in small engines) is the same as most machine oil. Specifically air compressors and such. (99% of 30wt is low ash now) Now as far as oiling goes...

I haven't taken out a sleeve fan and looked inside, but all the industrial applications I work with that use bronze bushing, use oilite bronze bushings, meaning they're impregnated with oil. You can tell this by heating it up and watching oil beads form. A couple of drops, not full is all you ever need. If you pack any bearings or bushings full of oil, it kills it's ability to cool said bearings. Plus as it heats up, oil expands 10% for every doubling of temp. Oil is also a heat insulator...

I just took apart an old antec 80mm From a p/s. This ran for 6 yrs, and still has oil in it. While I will say oiling a fan is mostly a good idea, no way do you want to fill that cavity up.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by lilduke View Post
I just took apart an old antec 80mm From a p/s. This ran for 6 yrs, and still has oil in it. While I will say oiling a fan is mostly a good idea, no way do you want to fill that cavity up.
Sleeve bearing fans can last a VERY long time if they are properly sealed.

And there are some sleeve bearings you wish to fill all the way up. Hydro-Wave, Hydrodynamic, & Fluid Dynamic bearings are ones that require themselves to be filled up to a certain level and be re-sealed properly.
 

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I wonder if i can use cooking oil. CBF opening up a new engine oil bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
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Originally Posted by magicase;12105697
I wonder if i can use cooking oil. CBF opening up a new engine oil bottle.
Well, when the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers went to a "natural" garage and had their oil changed, the hippy mechanic put vegetable oil in their car. It didn't get far . . .
 

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Are you suggesting that the fans be lubricated before use even if they're brand new from the factory?

I would think that the factory put some kind of lube in there. However, is it your experience that lubing new fans make them better (higher RPM at same voltage, less noise)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsightSoul;12242236
Are you suggesting that the fans be lubricated before use even if they're brand new from the factory?
Exactly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsightSoul;12242236
I would think that the factory put some kind of lube in there.
Sleeve bearing fans are inexpensive. We know there is significant variation in brand new fans. Some are bound to come out nearly dry. If you lubricate your fan, you have not harmed it and you have assured yourself that it has been properly lubricated.
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsightSoul;12242236
However, is it your experience that lubing new fans make them better (higher RPM at same voltage, less noise)?
Can't say they're better. Certainly not less noisy unless your fan is already dry. But given the failure rate of sleeve bearing fans it is just prudent to make sure they are properly lubricated so they will have a better chance of lasting.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsightSoul;12242236
Are you suggesting that the fans be lubricated before use even if they're brand new from the factory?

I would think that the factory put some kind of lube in there. However, is it your experience that lubing new fans make them better (higher RPM at same voltage, less noise)?
Not all fans get QC'd out of the factory. So some fans may need it.

Generally though, after 2 years of 24/7 use you should consider lubing your fans to keep their life up.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12242311
Not all fans get QC'd out of the factory. So some fans may need it.

Generally though, after 2 years of 24/7 use you should consider lubing your fans to keep their life up.
i think after two years you might as well get a new fan.

Sure they are designed to run for 100,000 + hours most of the time but by then no amount of lube will get rid of wear and tear of the bearing. Along with the increase of noise and possibly rust if your in a very moist place.

This is only if your a Fanatic. If your just the average Joe my suggestion is dont even bother lubing. I think its more work then reward.
 

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It's 2-3 minutes of work per fan.

I've got yates going on their 4th year of work which are humming a long just fine like day 1.

A good, or even decent sleeve bearing fan can last a long while as long as you lube it up.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12249298
It's 2-3 minutes of work per fan.

I've got yates going on their 4th year of work which are humming a long just fine like day 1.

A good, or even decent sleeve bearing fan can last a long while as long as you lube it up.
Makes sense. Lube = $5 for a ton of lube that you can use to save many fans. One new fan = $10. On average I think OCNers have at least 5 fans in their system. That's a lot of money saved.

Which got me thinking. Anyone tried to lube up the PSU fan? I have a Corsair but I'm not sure what kind of fans they use.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tator Tot;12249298
It's 2-3 minutes of work per fan.

I've got yates going on their 4th year of work which are humming a long just fine like day 1.

A good, or even decent sleeve bearing fan can last a long while as long as you lube it up.
Thing is i never i ran a fan 100,000 hours.

Not even in my server

a year has 8760

Thats 11 years of Non-Stop service.

And that low quality fans.

High quality fans promise up to 150,000 hours with only the occasional clean.

I think if your enough of a enthusiast to lub your fans you should get a ball bearing fan.

But thats just my .02

There are exceptions. For example if you want to use 200mm fans with your coolermaster / ANtec to make it look good you dont have much choice in which case lubing might be ideal.
 

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Okay, I found and oiled my Antec OEM 3-speed fans like indicated in the first post. The oil reservoir was found exactly where I would expect it to be.

However, I peeled off the sticker behind a Coolermaster Blademaster fan (those that come with the 212+) and I can't find a cap of any type, only small indentation in a solid plastic surface. Those fans are listed with a "long life sleeve" bearing, whatever that means. Does anyone else have a clue as to where you can find the access to the oil reservoir for a Blademaster? Or is it best to just leave that fan alone?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by InsightSoul
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Makes sense. Lube = $5 for a ton of lube that you can use to save many fans. One new fan = $10. On average I think OCNers have at least 5 fans in their system. That's a lot of money saved.

Which got me thinking. Anyone tried to lube up the PSU fan? I have a Corsair but I'm not sure what kind of fans they use.

I just fixed my 80mm fan in my Antec EA380 PSU a few days ago. It has been in a HTPC running 24/7 for about 2.5 years. I was blowing out the dust the other day and noticed the fan was not spinning. Took it out and it was very stiff to turn by hand. Did wat the guide shows (but did not know the guide was even here) using some sewing machine oil. after playing with it for a few minutes, it started spinning freely. Seems to be working fine now in a server. I will be checking on it periodically to make sure it is still working.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by blupupher
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I just fixed my 80mm fan in my Antec EA380 PSU a few days ago. It has been in a HTPC running 24/7 for about 2.5 years. I was blowing out the dust the other day and noticed the fan was not spinning. Took it out and it was very stiff to turn by hand. Did wat the guide shows (but did not know the guide was even here) using some sewing machine oil. after playing with it for a few minutes, it started spinning freely. Seems to be working fine now in a server. I will be checking on it periodically to make sure it is still working.

Can you check the RPM's on the fans?

The might be working but only just.
 

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How do you check fan RPM on a PSU?
It seems to be moving air, but even new they don't blow that much. Seems about the same as my other 380 (and 430's also).
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by yoshirama
View Post

Okay, I found and oiled my Antec OEM 3-speed fans like indicated in the first post. The oil reservoir was found exactly where I would expect it to be.

However, I peeled off the sticker behind a Coolermaster Blademaster fan (those that come with the 212+) and I can't find a cap of any type, only small indentation in a solid plastic surface. Those fans are listed with a "long life sleeve" bearing, whatever that means. Does anyone else have a clue as to where you can find the access to the oil reservoir for a Blademaster? Or is it best to just leave that fan alone?

I don't think you can add oil to it as per the OP. Thanks for saving me the trouble. I was going to do this to my BM fans but there's no need to anymore.
 
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