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Quote:


Originally Posted by StuffStuff1
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Thing is i never i ran a fan 100,000 hours.
Thats 11 years of Non-Stop service.

You're assuming those fans are working at 25*C; but usually they're working at 35*C which often cuts the life of a sleeve bearing fan in half to 50,000 Hours.

Still though; MTBF numbers mean jack fiddle.

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Originally Posted by InsightSoul
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Makes sense. Lube = $5 for a ton of lube that you can use to save many fans. One new fan = $10. On average I think OCNers have at least 5 fans in their system. That's a lot of money saved.

More or less the idea.

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Originally Posted by InsightSoul
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Which got me thinking. Anyone tried to lube up the PSU fan? I have a Corsair but I'm not sure what kind of fans they use.

Corsair units use Dual Ball Bearing & Ball Bearing fans besides the CX Series which use sleeve bearing fans.

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Originally Posted by yoshirama
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However, I peeled off the sticker behind a Coolermaster Blademaster fan (those that come with the 212+) and I can't find a cap of any type, only small indentation in a solid plastic surface. Those fans are listed with a "long life sleeve" bearing, whatever that means. Does anyone else have a clue as to where you can find the access to the oil reservoir for a Blademaster? Or is it best to just leave that fan alone?

Blade Master's have a sealed bearing. So unless you cut them open, they're gonna stay sealed.

Quote:


Originally Posted by StuffStuff1
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Can you check the RPM's on the fans?

The might be working but only just.


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Originally Posted by blupupher
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How do you check fan RPM on a PSU?
It seems to be moving air, but even new they don't blow that much. Seems about the same as my other 380 (and 430's also).

To check RPM levels of a PSU fan you either need to split the wire; or use a Tachometer.

The later is easier, it involves a lazer and a piece of reflective tape you place on the blade.

To be honest though; as long as it's spinning it doesn't matter. A good fan controller in a PSU keeps the fan low till around 75-80% load.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Tator Tot
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...

To check RPM levels of a PSU fan you either need to split the wire; or use a Tachometer.

The later is easier, it involves a lazer and a piece of reflective tape you place on the blade.

To be honest though; as long as it's spinning it doesn't matter. A good fan controller in a PSU keeps the fan low till around 75-80% load.

Thats kind of what I was thinking.
Heck, I have no idea how long it was in my HTPC with the fan not running (but it only pulls ~120w max, usually closer to 80).
The server it is in now is even less than that.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Tator Tot
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You're assuming those fans are working at 25*C; but usually they're working at 35*C which often cuts the life of a sleeve bearing fan in half to 50,000 Hours.

Still though; MTBF numbers mean jack fiddle.

Thats still 5 1/2 years. And i still haven't seen a fan run that long.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by StuffStuff1
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Thats still 5 1/2 years. And i still haven't seen a fan run that long.

My fans will be


Not going to throw away a good product when it's easy to just put a bit of lube in them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
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Originally Posted by steven88
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ehume, any reason why the label shouldn't be completely removed in first step?

I did that the first time I lubricated a fan. I didn't pay enough attention and laid it back down incorrectly. With most fans it wouldn't make a difference, but a Scythe fan is packaged with the label in front.

If you don't pull the label off you don't have to remember how it goes. Also, you don't run the risk of the label accidentally sticking to something other than the fan.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by StuffStuff1
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Thats still 5 1/2 years. And i still haven't seen a fan run that long.

I've got 5 Coolermaster TLF-R82 fans that have been running almost 24-7 in my first build since December 2003 with no maintenance whatsoever. They are technically rifle bearings and they're on a fan controller and are not running wide open, but still. http://www.dvhardware.net/review22_cmneonledfan.html

Just sayin'.
 

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I have some Ultra Kaze 3000's running full speed for over 2 years of mostly 24/7 use, still click free. And I think the only reason they are still running well is because every time I dust my case, I remove the fans and lube them. I just use whatever is around the garage, usually power steering fluid. Not sure if that's really ideal, but it works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
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Originally Posted by solidsteel144
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Would there be any particular reason not to use this oil?


That looks to be SAE 20. Looks good to me.
 

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Would WD40 be suitable for fans?
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
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Originally Posted by magicase
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Would WD40 be suitable for fans?

WD40 is a penetrant, not a lubricant. Think rusted hinges . . .
 

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I'll just use some 5W30 engine oil then.
 

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Ive used 15W50 airplane engine oil on sleeve bearing fans before and it worked great. It has some sort of catalyst in it that makes it cling to metal parts and not wear out or come off.
 

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