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Discussion Starter #1
My boss asked me to shop around for a wireless router and set it up at work. I bought a D-Link DIR-825 and I can't get it online. I ran the wizard setup cd and tried setting up the router manually with no luck. The ISP is Xplornet and it's a satellite connection plugged into a Hughes HN9000 satellite modem.

Now it works fine plugged directly into our work computer but it doesn't seem to want to connect to the router. I called the ISP for assistance and they told me I'm on my own to get it working.

I'm stumped as to why it's not working. I've exhausted my knowledge of wireless routers and need some advice.
 

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Did you reboot the satellite modem after connecting it to the router...? Certain modems (satellite or otherwise) require a reboot after you change the client device in order to update the associated MAC address...
 

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Typically, when a router does not communicate outside of its subnet the problem is either the NAT configuration and/or you're not pointing to your default gateway. I imagine you have configured your new router on a private class subnet? All of your computers are pointing to your new router's IP?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Quote:


Originally Posted by ComGuards
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Did you reboot the satellite modem after connecting it to the router...? Certain modems (satellite or otherwise) require a reboot after you change the client device in order to update the associated MAC address...

I did. It took 5-6 minutes to come back up. Still no luck though.

Quote:


Originally Posted by scottsee
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Typically, when a router does not communicate outside of its subnet the problem is either the NAT configuration and/or you're not pointing to your default gateway. I imagine you have configured your new router on a private class subnet? All of your computers are pointing to your new router's IP?

I'm sorry, but I'm not sure I understand.
I know that the ISP is supposed to send all the IP address to the modem automatically, and that I had the router set up to accept them automatically.
 

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That's vague

Your satellite modem is using one public IP address, correct?. Hypothetically let's say that's 100.99.88.77. When you set up your internal network you should have created a private class subnet (192.x.x.x) for local communication inside your network. Correct? You configured your new router's default gateway and dns server and to point to the satellite modem allowing your internal network to communicate to the internet though dynamic nat?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by scottsee
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That's vague

Your satellite modem is using one public IP address, correct?. Hypothetically let's say that's 100.99.88.77. When you set up your internal network you should have created a private class subnet (192.x.x.x) for local communication inside your network. Correct? You configured your new router's default gateway and dns server and to point to the satellite modem allowing your internal network to communicate to the internet though dynamic nat?

Scottsee, it's obvious that you're a fan of Cisco, and network guru, but what you just wrote is going to go over the head of most everybody


The OP probably isn't running an enterprise-level device. That being said, he's probably running factory default, out-of-the-box configurations on the router. Maybe with a change to how the router WAN connects, but all that is probably through a GUI.

I don't think it's necessary to go through all those fancy networking terms
No slight intended, but you gotta bring yourself down a notch on the networking-side when you're dealing with non-Cisco-grade hardware
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Folken
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I did. It took 5-6 minutes to come back up. Still no luck though.

I'm sorry, but I'm not sure I understand.
I know that the ISP is supposed to send all the IP address to the modem automatically, and that I had the router set up to accept them automatically.

What setup did you have previously? Single computer connected to the modem? Do you remember if there was a program that required a username/password to initiate the connection?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ComGuards View Post
Scottsee, it's obvious that you're a fan of Cisco, and network guru, but what you just wrote is going to go over the head of most everybody


The OP probably isn't running an enterprise-level device. That being said, he's probably running factory default, out-of-the-box configurations on the router. Maybe with a change to how the router WAN connects, but all that is probably through a GUI.

I don't think it's necessary to go through all those fancy networking terms
No slight intended, but you gotta bring yourself down a notch on the networking-side when you're dealing with non-Cisco-grade hardware

No offense, but that is about as dumbed up as I can make it. The OP hasn't offered any insite to how he has configured his local network. 99% of the time what he has described is due to either NAT or the Default gateway.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by scottsee
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No offense, but that is about as dumbed up as I can make it. The OP hasn't offered any insite to how he has configured his local network. 99% of the time what he has described is due to either NAT or the Default gateway.

No offense taken - I know how it is. Our "dumbed down" network talk would still be way over the head of a lot of people
"Dynamic NAT? Huh?"
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Quote:


Originally Posted by scottsee
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That's vague

Your satellite modem is using one public IP address, correct?. Hypothetically let's say that's 100.99.88.77. When you set up your internal network you should have created a private class subnet (192.x.x.x) for local communication inside your network. Correct? You configured your new router's default gateway and dns server and to point to the satellite modem allowing your internal network to communicate to the internet though dynamic nat?

The satellite is using one IP address, yes. As for the default gateway and dns server I do not know. I thought it was set up automatically by the router itself. And I don't know what dynamic nat is but our ISP uses a dynamic IP. Is this the same thing?

Quote:


Originally Posted by ComGuards
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The OP probably isn't running an enterprise-level device. That being said, he's probably running factory default, out-of-the-box configurations on the router. Maybe with a change to how the router WAN connects, but all that is probably through a GUI.

That is correct. I'm using a D-Link DIR-825 and I'm using the GUI on the router to set it up. It all goes smoothly,all lights are lit up on the router but when I go to a web page it says it can not be displayed.

Quote:


Originally Posted by ComGuards
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What setup did you have previously? Single computer connected to the modem? Do you remember if there was a program that required a username/password to initiate the connection?

We were running the satellite modem directly into the PC. No username or password because the ISP doesn't require one with dynamic IP (DHCP).
I'm afraid my networking knowledge is quite limited. I wish I understood more of what everyone is asking me.
 

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When you bring up the "Status" page by clicking the link on the top-menu-bar, what information do you get?

Most critically the information under the "WAN" section?

Also, who is your Satellite provider, so I might go look up their webpage...
 

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Well, they claim that their service works with any router, and they include a pretty basic tutorial video (http://www.xplornet.com/support/d-link-dhcp.aspx), so I can't say that they have crappy FAQs or support.

What does your router display under the STATUS page, specifically the WAN information?

Also, I don't mean to be a doofus, but you're sure you've connected the cables to the correct ports in the back of the router?
[I have to ask - standard operating procedure].
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Quote:


Originally Posted by ComGuards
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Well, they claim that their service works with any router, and they include a pretty basic tutorial video (http://www.xplornet.com/support/d-link-dhcp.aspx), so I can't say that they have crappy FAQs or support.

When I go into manual configure it's set to Dynamic IP (DHCP) and the DNS boxes are empty by default, so I'm stumped.

Quote:


Originally Posted by ComGuards
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What does your router display under the STATUS page, specifically the WAN information?

I'm not at work right now but I'll check it again in the morning.

Quote:


Originally Posted by ComGuards
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Also, I don't mean to be a doofus, but you're sure you've connected the cables to the correct ports in the back of the router?
[I have to ask - standard operating procedure].

I believe so. Cable goes from the back of the modem into the "internet" port on the back of the router and the cable from the back of the computer goes into the "1" port on the back of the router. (I even tried 2, 3 & 4 just to be sure it wasn't a bad port).
 

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If you have have your new router configured to receive an IP address from a DHCP server you need to make sure your satellite modem is configured as a DHCP server so it can hand an IP out.

When you enable your router to receive an IP via DHCP the DNS will automatically be configured, as well as the Default Gateway during the Bootp process.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComGuards View Post
What does your router display under the STATUS page, specifically the WAN information?
When I'm on the Status page under WAN it says:

Connection Type: DHCP Client
Cable Status: Connected
Network Status: Established
MAC address
IP address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
Primary DNS Server
Secondary DNS Server
Advanced DNS: Disabled

When I'm in the manual internet setup page under WAN I see:

Internet Connection: Dynamic IP (DHCP)
Enable Advanced DNS Service: check or uncheck
Host Name: DIR-825
Use Unicasting: check or uncheck
Primary DNS Server: 0.0.0.0
Secondary DNS Server: 0.0.0.0
MTU: 1500
MAC Address

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottsee View Post
If you have have your new router configured to receive an IP address from a DHCP server you need to make sure your satellite modem is configured as a DHCP server so it can hand an IP out.
I poked around the modem a bit but I didn't see anything like that, that would let me change anything. It was mostly status information.
 

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Hi,

Just out of curiosity (for now at least) but is there a reason you needed to get a wireless router to replace the previous device..?

If not, then it might have been a simpler task to just add a WAP (Wireless Access Point) to your previous setup...

I'm presuming that you are still able to access LAN (Local Area Network - internal network) resources, and I for one would be interested to know whether the IP of the DHCP server and the IP of this wireless router are the same - and also if this is the same as it was with the previous router... Normally, in my experience at least, businesses would have a server deal with DHCP and therefore would assign things like the Default Gateway IP (which I'm hoping you've already confirmed as being that of the router) and DNS settings for the DHCP clients....

It might even be an idea to revert back to the old router (if you haven't reverted back already) to ensure that there are no credentials or other setup details in the WAN that would assist you in getting the new router working...

Oh, and just one other question... Are you able to connect to the WLAN (Wireless LAN), the internet, or neither...? I'm guessing you can connect as far as the router, but IDK if that is wired or wirelessly... Just asking as it isn't clear on that point above...and can be much difference between the troubleshooting steps...


On the WAN side, you would be best leaving that set to DHCP, as your ISP would deal with that side of things; the LAN side you will need to assign, but this is normally set to being something along the lines of 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1 and would only need to be changed if it doesn't match what your other devices are set to use...

Anyway, let us know and we can try to help you...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nude_Lewd_Man View Post
Hi,

Just out of curiosity (for now at least) but is there a reason you needed to get a wireless router to replace the previous device..?

If not, then it might have been a simpler task to just add a WAP (Wireless Access Point) to your previous setup...

I'm presuming that you are still able to access LAN (Local Area Network - internal network) resources, and I for one would be interested to know whether the IP of the DHCP server and the IP of this wireless router are the same - and also if this is the same as it was with the previous router... Normally, in my experience at least, businesses would have a server deal with DHCP and therefore would assign things like the Default Gateway IP (which I'm hoping you've already confirmed as being that of the router) and DNS settings for the DHCP clients....

It might even be an idea to revert back to the old router (if you haven't reverted back already) to ensure that there are no credentials or other setup details in the WAN that would assist you in getting the new router working...
We are a small business in the middle of nowhere and have a satellite internet connection that runs into a satellite modem that connects into our ancient Pentium III computer upstairs. We've never had a router connected before and my boss just asked if I could set up a wireless router so we can use our laptops downstairs. I thought it would be an easy task because I've set up wireless connections at home without any problems. Now I feel really stupid that I can't get this working.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nude_Lewd_Man View Post
Oh, and just one other question... Are you able to connect to the WLAN (Wireless LAN), the internet, or neither...? I'm guessing you can connect as far as the router, but IDK if that is wired or wirelessly... Just asking as it isn't clear on that point above...and can be much difference between the troubleshooting steps...

I haven't got around to the WLAN setup yet. I can connect as far as the router but that's it with a ethernet cable.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nude_Lewd_Man View Post
On the WAN side, you would be best leaving that set to DHCP, as your ISP would deal with that side of things; the LAN side you will need to assign, but this is normally set to being something along the lines of 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1 and would only need to be changed if it doesn't match what your other devices are set to use...
Yes, the router's IP is 192.168.0.1 the same as the satellite modem. After I use the routers setup wizard I go to the status page and under WAN it doesn't assign a default gateway. Is that normal or should it have a number there? Also, where the satellite modem was connected directly into the computer, should I clone the mac address of the computer onto the router during setup?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nude_Lewd_Man View Post
Anyway, let us know and we can try to help you...

Thank-you everyone. I really appreciate it.

On a side note, should the cable between the router and the satellite modem be a crossover cable? My ISP told me that was what I needed. Were they correct, as that's what I have been using this whole time.
 
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