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Discussion Starter #1
Hi dear fellows,
First of all, please note that I will talk about a laptop problem, not about desktop/builds. I have a laptop with a HM76 Chipset and I've upgrade from an i5 3210M to an i7 3630QM, so perfectly compatible. I also bought an additional stick of 8GB RAM with dual voltage of 1.35V and 1.5V, from Crucial (according to the information on the Crucial's website, I think they are both running at 1.5V).

It was everything OK and I was very happy with the big upgrade. However, when I decide to do a memory test with memtest86 and memtest86+ I got many errors, but just in the latest tests, and always after 1h of test (with Windows diagnostic tool I had no errors). So I did some tests with memtest86 to know which RAM stick was damaged and I came to the conclusion that they are both good but Slot 1 don't. If I put any stick of RAM in the Slot 1 I have errors in memtest86 and BSoD in Prime95. If I just use the Slot 2 I have no problems. I don't know if I already had this problem in Slot 1 before the upgrade, because I never did a scan memtest86, or if by some (very strange) reason, I have damaged the motherboard/Slot 1 with this CPU and RAM upgrade.

But, what I would like to ask is if there is any problem of ignoring this damage in Slot 1 and use only the Slot 2 with the limited 8GB RAM, or if it is probable that the motherboard will show more problems/errors/damages in the future.. ?? Should I by another motherboard, or I will not have bigger problems than an unusable Slot of RAM?

Thank you in advance for your time and help,
I wish you all a great week!

Best regards.
 

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Overclock Failed...
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When any computer starts up it reads the SPD table (memory timing table) on the memory stick closest to the CPU and chooses the timings (from the table) that match the CPU speed that is set in the BIOS. It then applies those timings to all the memory sticks that are installed. If you mix memory (ie. don't buy all the memory as one matched set) the it's possible the the timings for one won't work with the other.

You can download CPU-Z and see part of the SPD tables on you memory.. Note that CPU-z and many other such programs don't show you all of the timings (there are over 20). RAMMon will show you more of them.

Then there's XMP memory profiles (in the BIOS) that can cause problems.

Background (simplified):

When any computer starts up the BIOS reads the SPD tables programmed into the memory. You can download and run CPU-Z to see the SPD tables in your memory. The BIOS then uses the memory speed and memory timings from the SPD tables that corresponds to the CPU speed that is set in the BIOS.

XMP profiles were developed to allow automatically setting not only memory speed and timings automatically, but also memory voltage. So, with the added ability to increase voltage, memory manufacturers could program SPD tables that run the memory even faster with the higher voltages available, and do that automatically too.

But the whole concept of XMP is faulted because the person writing the XMP SPD table for the memory has no idea what motherboard, CPU, what other peripherals are connected to your motherboard, nor even how many memory sticks you have installed. So, XMP profiles are just a guess at what memory overclock will work for the widest range of motherboards, CPUs, memory, and computer configurations. They have nothing to do with what your specific setup is. ... they're just a guess.


Do they work? Sometimes, sometimes not. And even if they do work it is unlikely they are the best settings for you particular setup.

Memory setting (with or without overclocking) is best done by manually setting the memory settings in the BIOS.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

When any computer starts up it reads the SPD table (memory timing table) on the memory stick closest to the CPU and chooses the timings (from the table) that match the CPU speed that is set in the BIOS. It then applies those timings to all the memory sticks that are installed. If you mix memory (ie. don't buy all the memory as one matched set) the it's possible the the timings for one won't work with the other.

You can download CPU-Z and see part of the SPD tables on you memory.. Note that CPU-z and many other such programs don't show you all of the timings (there are over 20). RAMMon will show you more of them.

Then there's XMP memory profiles (in the BIOS) that can cause problems.

Background (simplified):

When any computer starts up the BIOS reads the SPD tables programmed into the memory. You can download and run CPU-Z to see the SPD tables in your memory. The BIOS then uses the memory speed and memory timings from the SPD tables that corresponds to the CPU speed that is set in the BIOS.

XMP profiles were developed to allow automatically setting not only memory speed and timings automatically, but also memory voltage. So, with the added ability to increase voltage, memory manufacturers could program SPD tables that run the memory even faster with the higher voltages available, and do that automatically too.

But the whole concept of XMP is faulted because the person writing the XMP SPD table for the memory has no idea what motherboard, CPU, what other peripherals are connected to your motherboard, nor even how many memory sticks you have installed. So, XMP profiles are just a guess at what memory overclock will work for the widest range of motherboards, CPUs, memory, and computer configurations. They have nothing to do with what your specific setup is. ... they're just a guess.


Do they work? Sometimes, sometimes not. And even if they do work it is unlikely they are the best settings for you particular setup.

Memory setting (with or without overclocking) is best done by manually setting the memory settings in the BIOS.
Hi, thank you very much for your detailed answer. But, as I said in the beginnig I'm talking about a laptop. That options to overclock and change voltages, speeds, XMP profile, etc are available for a Laptop? I think I haven't found that option in my BIOS, but I will give another look.
 

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Download RamMon and check if both types of memory are the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

Download RamMon and check if both types of memory are the same.
Thank you. I've downloaded and installed the software and I've shut down the PC to insert both sticks of RAM and now I have an upgrade of the situation, I don't know if this will open the door to new possibilities of the problem:

Now, if I use any stick of RAM on Slot 1 the PC boots but there is a black screen, the logo of "ASUS" don't even appear. I tried all the possibilities of playing with RAM in sticks in the 2 slots, and this happens with any of the RAM sticks in the slot 1. If I use just 1 RAM stick in the slot 2, the PC boots normally (independently of the RAM stick it is). In fact it has already happened 2 days ago, but I saw this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1OZQL2l-lM) with a very strange method and I decide to try and it worked, the PC booted normally. But now that problem appeared again, and if I use any stick of RAM in the slot 1 I have a black screen in the boot.

This information changes anything?
 
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