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Ok so i have a pump sizing question. Is there such a thing as too much pump in a loop? For instance, im looking to build a basic loop, cpu with a 360mm radiator simple. I want to go custom because of future expandability if i decide i want to put graphics cards under water, but for now just starting with that.

So EK has these kits, for their 360L kit they prepackaged this pump/res combo EK-DCP 2.2 X-RES incl. Pump

But lets say i want to do a D5 with a reservoir combo, would this be too much pump for the loop? I know the more things you put in a loop the stronger pump you will need to overcome the restriction to have adequate circulation but is there such a thing of the coolant circulating through too fast or since they have a speed adjuster on some models is this a moot point?

Thanks,

-Jon
 

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You *could* in theory have "too much pump," but only if you have such a powerful pump that it overpressurizes the components in the loop. Will not happen with a D5.

I ran a D5 w/XSPC bay res, Koolance CPU 370, and a Phobya G-Changer 360mm rad for about a year with no problems. If you get a D5 Vario you can also reduce the pump speed to eliminate noise.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDominion View Post

Ok so i have a pump sizing question. Is there such a thing as too much pump in a loop? For instance, im looking to build a basic loop, cpu with a 360mm radiator simple. I want to go custom because of future expandability if i decide i want to put graphics cards under water, but for now just starting with that.

So EK has these kits, for their 360L kit they prepackaged this pump/res combo EK-DCP 2.2 X-RES incl. Pump

But lets say i want to do a D5 with a reservoir combo, would this be too much pump for the loop? I know the more things you put in a loop the stronger pump you will need to overcome the restriction to have adequate circulation but is there such a thing of the coolant circulating through too fast or since they have a speed adjuster on some models is this a moot point?

Thanks,

-Jon
In answer to the bold part, yes you can have flow too fast inside the loop to adequately transfer heat from your block to your liquid. Flow iirc would have to be above 1.5 gpm for this to start happening. Check Martin's site for the particulars.
With just a single d5 you won't have this issue especially with speed adjustment.
 
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With a D5, you won't have any problems. The only time too much pump becomes an issue is if you are running a DDC pump, mainly the MCP35X, at full speed in a low restriction loop, such as yours. The pump would overheat and the pump would burn out. But running the pump at a lower speed prevents this from happening.

But that's only with DDC pumps since they are passively cooled. The D5 pumps are essentially watercooled, being cooled by the water that passes through them.
 

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I don't think you can have too much flow.
It's just that above 1.5 to 2 gpm, the gain in performance is rather small and will likely be offset by the added heat from the pump dumped into.your loop.

But lije everyone else has said, you'll be fine with a single D5.

I also prefer a pump and res separated, not a combo.
A pump/res combo can be harder to decouple for sound. I like my pump all by it's lonesome self on a Shoggy Sandwich.
 

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Anyways, I suggest the adjustable ones, the ones with a little 1 to 5 dial. You can select what flow/noise ratio suits you the most that way.

Unless you get a CW611 controller. With that, you can control your pump no problems. So save some $$$ and get a plain non-adjustable one....than adjust it with the controller.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by morencyam View Post

With a D5, you won't have any problems. The only time too much pump becomes an issue is if you are running a DDC pump, mainly the MCP35X, at full speed in a low restriction loop, such as yours. The pump would overheat and the pump would burn out. But running the pump at a lower speed prevents this from happening.

But that's only with DDC pumps since they are passively cooled. The D5 pumps are essentially watercooled, being cooled by the water that passes through them.
D5 and DDC share the same basic internals, just different footprint and volute. Both use the floating impeller on the white ceramic ball and both dump heat back into the loop. The D5 is designed for high flow, low restrictions. The DDC-1 10W is a passively cooled since the power consumption is low. The DDC-3 18W runs hot when under load.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmaverick View Post

D5 and DDC share the same basic internals, just different footprint and volute. Both use the floating impeller on the white ceramic ball and both dump heat back into the loop. The D5 is designed for high flow, low restrictions. The DDC-1 10W is a passively cooled since the power consumption is low. The DDC-3 18W runs hot when under load.
Not entirely true.
The D5 has a metal (stainless?) volute, and the DDC has a plastic volute.
This simpke difference will cause the D5 to transfer more of it's heat to the water.
The DDC will feel hotter because it is cooled more by air than water.

In fact, you can buy a heatsink specially made to cool the hotter running DDC.
Or you could buy a metal volute for your DDC to allow it to be cooled by the coolant, just like the D5 does.

The D5 also tends to be a bit more quiet.

And the PWM issues of the D5. That's not an issues with any of the pump's parts. Just the PCB itself, and how it delivers the power to the pump's motor.
 

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And btw pumps run hotter when thetr is less restriction, and more flow.
So if you are planning a low restriction, high fliw loop, the D5 is better equiped to deal with it.

Both the DDC and the D5 probably produce close to the same amount of heat. But the D5's metal volute allows it to better deal with it's heat output.

This is why a DDC will feel warmer to the touch.

Now some guys may feel the DDC is a better pump because it doesn't dump as much heat into the loop. Depends on how you look at it I guess.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PepeLapiu View Post

And btw pumps run hotter when thetr is less restriction, and more flow.
So if you are planning a low restriction, high fliw loop, the D5 is better equiped to deal with it.

Both the DDC and the D5 probably produce close to the same amount of heat. But the D5's metal volute allows it to better deal with it's heat output.

This is why a DDC will feel warmer to the touch.

Now some guys may feel the DDC is a better pump because it doesn't dump as much heat into the loop. Depends on how you look at it I guess.
Again, there are 2 type of DDC pumps, you can not just group the two together stating that both require air cooling, The DDC-1 series is 10W and remains cool to the touch just like the D5.
The DDC-3 series requires the heatsink on the base. All of the Laing pumps have the stainless steel impeller base. Sure, the D5 dumps it's heat load into the coolant, thus the loop needs more fan energy and RAD cooling to compensate for the added heat load.
 
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