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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
in a watercooled build,

Is it important to keep the same kind of waterblock materials/metals for all your devices you are cooling?

for example:

EK waterblock - nickel plated electrolytic copper
Kryos HF .925 silver edition - Silver / and copper

Or does it not matter?
 

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It doesn't really matter keeping the materials the same but I have heard that silver is used in some water cooling systems as an antimicrobial agent to keep your reservoir from getting filled with bacteria. But I am not really sure weather or not that works I mean 50C+ water is already rather inhospitable. SO tho answer your question It does not matter if the materials match.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DSP1;15249271
It doesn't really matter keeping the materials the same but I have heard that silver is used in some water cooling systems as an antimicrobial agent to keep your reservoir from getting filled with bacteria. But I am not really sure weather or not that works I mean 50C+ water is already rather inhospitable. SO tho answer your question It does not matter if the materials match.
With the exception of Aluminum. You will see corrosion in a loop if you mix nickel/copper/silver with aluminum unless you use anti-corrosion agents and even then you need to be pretty strict about maintaining the loop.

50c doesn't mean anything for growth. Light + heat + contaminants = eventual growth. Besides, the water in the loop has a very hard time getting to even 40c unless you are overtaxing the loop with a lot of heat and very little rad space.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angrybutcher;15249599
With the exception of Aluminum. You will see corrosion in a loop if you mix nickel/copper/silver with aluminum unless you use anti-corrosion agents and even then you need to be pretty strict about maintaining the loop.

50c doesn't mean anything for growth. Light + heat + contaminants = eventual growth. Besides, the water in the loop has a very hard time getting to even 40c unless you are overtaxing the loop with a lot of heat and very little rad space.
so why would anyone want aluminum in their loop?
 

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It's not just aluminium. see list below.

The metals above will resist the metals below. The greater the distance is between two metals, the greater the speed of corrosion.

Platinum
Gold
Graphite
Silver
Silver Solder
Titanium
Hastelloy C 4)
Monel
Stainless Steel (passive)
Nickel (passive)
Nickel-copper alloys
Bronzes
Copper
Brasses
Nickel (active)
Lead-Tin Alloys
Lead
Tin
Soft-solder
Hastelloy A 4)
Stainless Steel 316 1)
Stainless Steel 430 2)
Stainless Steel 410 3)
Cast Iron
Low-carbon Steel
Cadmium
Aluminum Alloys
Aluminum
Zinc
Magnesium Alloys
Magnesium
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Rognin
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It's not just aluminium. see list below.

The metals above will resist the metals below. The greater the distance is between two metals, the greater the speed of corrosion.

Nickel, copper, silver and aluminum are the most common metals in loops, with the exception of bronze and brass used in most fittings. Aluminum blocks and radiators are getting harder and harder to find, but they are still on the market. Why would I talk about other metals like Zinc, magnesium, cast iron or cadmium when they simply do not exist in the water cooling world?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Angrybutcher
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Nickel, copper, silver and aluminum are the most common metals in loops, with the exception of bronze and brass used in most fittings. Aluminum blocks and radiators are getting harder and harder to find, but they are still on the market. Why would I talk about other metals like Zinc, magnesium, cast iron or cadmium when they simply do not exist in the water cooling world?

Stainless Steel, Gold and a couple other can also be found in loops... That and it lists passive and active galvanic corrosion.

Edit: Why so arrogant?
 

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Originally Posted by jblanc03
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so why would anyone want aluminum in their loop?

Because aluminum watercooling products exist, and they are significantly cheaper than copper etc. For a custom loop, avoid aluminum and go with copper blocks (nickel plated if you prefer, or silver or gold if you can afford it and want the added bling).

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Originally Posted by DSP1
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It doesn't really matter keeping the materials the same but I have heard that silver is used in some water cooling systems as an antimicrobial agent to keep your reservoir from getting filled with bacteria. But I am not really sure weather or not that works I mean 50C+ water is already rather inhospitable. SO tho answer your question It does not matter if the materials match.

This is wrong in two ways... the first part has been fully addressed, but the danger is not only from bacteria but also algae, which can easily grow in 50C water, even assuming your loop hits that, which it won't if you have the proper amount of radiators. In any case, unless you run your loop 24/7/365, there will be extended periods where your loop stands at room temp.
 

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Copper has the same anti-microbial characteristics as silver, silver is just the best thermally conductive metal. Gold is just for bling, it's nowhere near as good as copper thermally.
 

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the game changes if you include a zinc anode to pick up the stray electrons that cause the disassociation we call corrosion. It also helps if you earth ground your loop to prevent electrolysis.
 

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Originally Posted by SCollins
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the game changes if you include a zinc anode to pick up the stray electrons that cause the disassociation we call corrosion. It also helps if you earth ground your loop to prevent electrolysis.

This.
 

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Originally Posted by Cavi Mike
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Copper has the same anti-microbial characteristics as silver, silver is just the best thermally conductive metal. Gold is just for bling, it's nowhere near as good as copper thermally.

This is technically mostly true, but with caveats. We're splitting hairs now, but here goes:

Copper does indeed also work as an anti-microbial, but it is a bit of a simplification to say it is interchangeable with silver in that capacity as not enough is understood about how either metal works in that regard. In any case, properly manufactured copper waterblocks are coated with a thin layer of shellac or similar sealant to prevent oxidation, which should keep free copper ions from doing their work on microbes. Any plating covers up the copper entirely, of course.

Also, silver is a lot more expensive than copper (much more expensive than it is better as a heat conductor) so it is impractical as a block material.

Silver is not used in PC watercooling loops for its thermal properties. Copper is not used in PC watercooling loops for its anti-microbial properties, but I suppose it would probably work to put in a raw copper killcoil instead of a silver one.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by threephi
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This is technically mostly true, but with caveats. We're splitting hairs now, but here goes:

Copper does indeed also work as an anti-microbial, but it is a bit of a simplification to say it is interchangeable with silver in that capacity as not enough is understood about how either metal works in that regard. In any case, properly manufactured copper waterblocks are coated with a thin layer of shellac or similar sealant to prevent oxidation, which should keep free copper ions from doing their work on microbes. Any plating covers up the copper entirely, of course.

Also, silver is a lot more expensive than copper (much more expensive than it is better as a heat conductor) so it is impractical as a block material.

Silver is not used in PC watercooling loops for its thermal properties. Copper is not used in PC watercooling loops for its anti-microbial properties, but I suppose it would probably work to put in a raw copper killcoil instead of a silver one.

Hmm you look like a man that might market this
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by threephi
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This is technically mostly true, but with caveats. We're splitting hairs now, but here goes:

Copper does indeed also work as an anti-microbial, but it is a bit of a simplification to say it is interchangeable with silver in that capacity as not enough is understood about how either metal works in that regard. In any case, properly manufactured copper waterblocks are coated with a thin layer of shellac or similar sealant to prevent oxidation, which should keep free copper ions from doing their work on microbes. Any plating covers up the copper entirely, of course.

Also, silver is a lot more expensive than copper (much more expensive than it is better as a heat conductor) so it is impractical as a block material.

Silver is not used in PC watercooling loops for its thermal properties. Copper is not used in PC watercooling loops for its anti-microbial properties, but I suppose it would probably work to put in a raw copper killcoil instead of a silver one.

I understand that fully but nowhere did I say anything about cost-effectiveness nor did I say what its use was for. I simply stated facts. 2+2 will always equal 4.
 

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Originally Posted by Greenback
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ok going to take my asprin my brain hurts

hahahaha remember making a battery in grade school out of a piece of zinc and a piece of copper dipped in some acid? Same concept except you're just trying to remove those stray electrons, not make a battery.
 

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Originally Posted by Worple
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Hmm you look like a man that might market this


Haha
that's probably a great idea, I'm sure us PC wackos will gladly pay $2 or $3 for a copper killcoil that costs approx. 8 cents in raw material. The percentage profit is a lot bigger than with silver but the markup per unit would still be smaller. Having two killcoils, one silver, one copper, would actually be really effective, I think.

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Originally Posted by Cavi Mike
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I understand that fully but nowhere did I say anything about cost-effectiveness nor did I say what its use was for. I simply stated facts. 2+2 will always equal 4.

Well this thread has gone somewhat off the rails but the main conversation, as I see it, has turned to the various metals in PC watercooling loops, and why they are used or not. So in the context of this thread, to my eyes, a plain reading of your very brief post implies you were citing silver's thermal properties as the reason it is used in loops. Otherwise, why mention it since as we agree, it's not relevant?
 
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