Overclock.net banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Avid Memer
Joined
·
5,958 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is there anywhere I can get a detailed overview on just exactly what everything does and how adjustments effect my system? I'd really like to know and understand what I'm doing when I finally swap out my Q6600 for my Q9450.
 

·
Avid Memer
Joined
·
5,958 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Maybe I'll have better luck if I just list everything and people can tell me what it means? I'll start with RAM timing controls because I have an idea of what everything is before that.

CAS# Latency
RAS# to CAS# Delay
RAS# PRE Time
RAS# ACT Time
RAS# to RAS# Delay
REF Cycle Time
READ to PRE Time

READ to WRITE Delay(S/D)
WRITE to READ Delay(S)
WRITE to READ Delay(D)
READ to READ Delay(S)
READ to READ Delay(D)
WRITE to WRITE Delay(S)
WRITE to WRITE Delay(D)

WRITE to PRE Delay
READ to PRE Delay
PRE to PRE Delay
ALL PRE to ACT Delay
ALL PRE to REF Delay

DRAM Static Read Control
Ai Clock Twister
Common Performance Level
Pull-In of CHA PH1
Pull-In of CHA PH2
Pull-In of CHA PH3
Pull-In of CHA PH4
Pull-In of CHB PH1
Pull-In of CHB PH2
Pull-In of CHB PH3
Pull-In of CHB PH4

CPU Voltage (self-explanatory, but I'd like to know my limits for all of these)
CPU PLL Voltage
North Bridge Voltage
DRAM Voltage
FSB Termination Voltage
South Bridge Voltage
SB 1.5V Voltage
Loadline Calibration
CPU GTL Voltage Reference
NB GTL Voltage Reference
DRAM Controller Voltage REF
DRAM Channel A Voltage REF
DRAM Channel B Voltage REF

CPU Spread Spectrum
PCIE Spread Spectrum

If there's anything noteworthy in the other tabs, I'd like to know about them. This is all under the Extreme Tweaker tab.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
All these can EASILY be found using google, with the exception of the RAM timings which are useless (aside from the four main ones)
 

·
Avid Memer
Joined
·
5,958 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks. I found most of them using Google, it was just time-consuming. I couldn't find anything extensive on the memory timings, though. I'd really like to have every last value manually inputted into my BIOS.

And I'd still like to know the safe limits for the voltages. I find a different value everywhere I look. The most common value I see flying around here is 1.3625 on the CPU. I've seen people at other forums claim anything up to 1.5 is safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by chessmyantidrug View Post
Thanks. I found most of them using Google, it was just time-consuming. I couldn't find anything extensive on the memory timings, though. I'd really like to have every last value manually inputted into my BIOS.

And I'd still like to know the safe limits for the voltages. I find a different value everywhere I look. The most common value I see flying around here is 1.3625 on the CPU. I've seen people at other forums claim anything up to 1.5 is safe.
Don't bother yourself with the timings (like I said, aside from the main 4), it'll take you years to find the right values and the most you'll gain if you filled all of them to your memory's most optimal and optimized settings are a couple megahertz more, really.

I'm not sure if your CPU is 65 or 45nm, the general max safe voltage on top end air for 65nm is ~1.5. Personally with my Tuniq, which was last years top end, I can't go over 1.45 without climbing over 80C, which isn't safe at all.

Don't bother with CPU PLL voltage, much like the rest of the RAM timings, it won't help your OC, and anything higher over the default 1.5 (for 65nm at least) will severly hurt your CPU (from what I read). 1.6 should be the very max for that one.

DRAM voltage=RAM voltages, it will vary depending on your RAM, but for the most part, with DDR2 the stock voltages are plenty even for your highest CPU OC (2.1 in my case), don't go over 2.3V with this one unless you want to hurt your RAM.

Leave the two SB voltages alone, they won't do anything for your OC either, they manage the SATA drives and other peripherals.

NB and FSB termination voltage are both very important if you OC past ~430 FSB. Don't bump NB over 1.6 unless you have water, and don't do over 1.55 with the top most air. FSB term varies but usually 1.45V is overkill.

Loadline Calibration is a very nice feature as a replacement for the pencil mod. It eliminates vdroop (your CPU voltages will be constant regardless of idle/load) this is my best friend when overclocking and simplifies your CPU voltages by a lot. This is safe for 65nm but I read that it can kill 45nm chips, but I think that's bull****.

Make sure you disable the spread spectrums, I'm not positive on what they're for but they hinder overclocking and I believe they're legacy features.

Again, I'd ignore all the RAM stuff and leave them on auto unless you've been overclocking RAM since computers came out, otherwise you wouldn't know the first thing of what they do, and I doubt anyone here as much of a clue, either
 

·
Avid Memer
Joined
·
5,958 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
My sig rig is up to date. I have a Q9450. I had to bump PLL to 1.52 at one point in the overclocking process to find stability. I didn't have to touch VTT at all to reach 8x430. Perhaps boosting that will allow me to find stability at higher speeds.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,093 Posts
Quote:


Don't bother with CPU PLL voltage, much like the rest of the RAM timings, it won't help your OC, and anything higher over the default 1.5 (for 65nm at least) will severly hurt your CPU (from what I read). 1.6 should be the very max for that one.

That's misleading. CPU PLL sometimes helps to stabilize an OC, doing it manually allows you to use less voltage than auto and lowering too low causes instability once again. It's mostly important for boot up.
 

·
Avid Memer
Joined
·
5,958 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'm not having any stability problems with the minimum setting of 1.5V. I had it at 1.52V on my way to 3.44GHz, but I backed it down and stress tested. Perfectly stable.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top