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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My computer is acting WEIRD.
So I was folding on my desktop and playing on my laptop (same one I'm on right now) when it suddenly restarted. It was weird, but I said OK and started folding again. About 10 min later it did the same. It is now shut down and I'm trying to figure out the problem.
Things I have found to not be the case:

The water cooling setup has not leaked. Solid as a rock.
The OC didn't cause it. I bumped up the voltage to 1.38 anyways, could there be an issues where this is too much?
The 24 pin and 8 pin cables are seated correctly.
It was not a surge. I had other things connected and they kept power.

Things in question:
Could the mosfets have gotten too hot? I'm turning around the fans to blow air at them.
Could the PSU have gotten too hot?
(open to suggestions)
 

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I mean, you really can't say "The OC didn't cause it", because you don't know. I would bet my money on the CPU overclock being unstable, or it could be the PSU is on its way out as well. Right down your voltages for the CPU, and after that, bring it back to stock clocks and voltages, or, to avoid error, reset the CMOS, and try and fold again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Peen View Post

I mean, you really can't say "The OC didn't cause it", because you don't know. I would bet my money on the CPU overclock being unstable, or it could be the PSU is on its way out as well. Right down your voltages for the CPU, and after that, bring it back to stock clocks and voltages, or, to avoid error, reset the CMOS, and try and fold again.
I am simply assuming it wasn't the OC because it had been going 24/7 for the past 4 days. I will probably reset the OC to stock and try again.
 

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An unstable overclock can go two weeks before showing any signs of instability. So yes, I'd reset the CMOS to bring everything back to stock. Remember to readjust your DRAM timings to advertised settings after the CMOS reset.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Peen View Post

An unstable overclock can go two weeks before showing any signs of instability. So yes, I'd reset the CMOS to bring everything back to stock. Remember to readjust your DRAM timings to advertised settings after the CMOS reset.
Woah. After passing P95 and all the folding, I assumed it was stable.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawNeedsHelp View Post

Woah. After passing P95 and all the folding, I assumed it was stable.
Well, we don't know it's unstable yet, but we'll find out soon enough. I think that is your issue, but it may be something else that we will have to further look into.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks. I'll post back here if there's anymore problems. BTW, I followed the exact steps in this video (except for the speedstep part, that was disabled): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMZoWOpry40
Does this look like it would be a stable OC? Also, any comment on the mosfet idea? The case is open so it isn't getting much airflow.
 

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That video looked alright. I'd recommend rather than using Manual for CPU Voltage, you use Offset. When using Offset, generally what you do is once you set it to Offset, save and boot into Windows, once you're in Windows you'd then using a program such as CPU-z to check what voltage your CPU gets on load. Once you've figured that out, you go back into the BIOS and adjust the Offset voltage accordingly (whether you have too much or too little).

Examples: it gives you 1.3v but you want 1.35v, then add +.05v in the bios. Conversely if it gave you 1.4v then you would want to do -.05v. That's how you do it. Also I believe the base voltage changes depending on the multiplier so make sure you are on the multiplier you want to use to accurately change the Vcore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Peen View Post

That video looked alright. I'd recommend rather than using Manual for CPU Voltage, you use Offset. When using Offset, generally what you do is once you set it to Offset, save and boot into Windows, once you're in Windows you'd then using a program such as CPU-z to check what voltage your CPU gets on load. Once you've figured that out, you go back into the BIOS and adjust the Offset voltage accordingly (whether you have too much or too little).

Examples: it gives you 1.3v but you want 1.35v, then add +.05v in the bios. Conversely if it gave you 1.4v then you would want to do -.05v. That's how you do it. Also I believe the base voltage changes depending on the multiplier so make sure you are on the multiplier you want to use to accurately change the Vcore.
Alright, I'll try that too. At load it sometimes gave me 1.36 according to CPUz, but I never thought much of it.
 
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