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The chart you linked to shows how much heat a given setup can dissipate. In short.

That chart keeps flow rate constant, radiator size constant, and the change in water temperature constant...the only things being changed are how fast the fans are going.
 

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The delta is the difference in temperature between the air entering the radiator vs the water temperature.

That chart give you heat dissapated at a 5c delta.

C/W is celcius degrees delta per watt of heat dissapated.

You can use these values to estimate you water temperature if you know how much heat in watts you are trying to cool.

I have many of these radiator equations in my pump/rad estimator spreadsheet, link in my sig..
 

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Not sure where the restriction question came from, but we really have two version here:

Water or Internal Restriction - This is the restriction the pump is working against and affects how much water flow rate you will have. Radiator designs have to give/take tradeoffs in this area. Generally wouldn't worry too much about this with stronger pumps.

Air restriction - Same sort of this, but the restriction the fans are working against. The more surface area and greater fin density, the more restrictive and less air flow you get. Generally this is the key to matching up a radiator design to various fans. Radiators with lower fin density and or less thickness generally work better for fans at very slow speeds. The opposite is true for very strong fans. No one radiator is strongest for all types of fans, they are each "Tuned" for either emphasis on one area, or sort of a balance that's not necessarily really strong in any one area. A good examples is the HWlabs SR1 (Designed for low speed fans) vs the GTX series (Designed for high speed fans).

There are also models that do good in all areas, but are not necessarily best in any one area. If you know for sure which fan speeds you want to operate, you can get a little more from one that's optimal in that area.

Regardless, the differences are fairly small and you can run any of them with success with any fan. We're really splitting hairs...
 
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