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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, my Phenom II X4 B35 is currently sitting on 250mhz x 14=3500mhz. If I up the FSB speed my RAM speed goes up too, thus far I know. My Ram is 2x2Gb DD3-1333mhz. Available FSB/DRAM ratios in my bios are: 1:2, 1:2.66, 1:3.33, 1:4. SO, should my FSB be only equal to 667/2 (333), 667/2.66 (250), 667/3.33 (200), 667/4 (166)? 667 cause of Double Data Rate. How much of a difference in memory speed can Ram tolerate? If I choose FSB to be 270mhz, at 1:2.66 ratio that would be 270*2*2.66=1436.4mhz. Can it run? Is this when you should increase DRAM voltage? Thanks.
 

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FSB times CPU Multiplier = CPU speed
FSB times Memory Multiplier = Memory speed
If an overclock is unstable, You can increase CPU and/or memory voltages for added stability.


How fast can you go? There's only one way to find out - try.


"Overclocking is a slow and methodical process of trial and error, mostly error, often accompanied by cold sweats in the dark of the night....then you succeed."
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There's only one way to find out - try.
I just went to bed but I will tomorrow. In the meantime, can RAM run on speeds in between 1333 and 1600mhz?

Also on a side note, I did bump my Ram to 1600 along with voltage some time ago. I had major artifacting in startup screen and bios; colors were all messed up and display was one quarter of full resolution. What's failing here, mobo, ram...?
 

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You can increment RAM speed by i HZ increments - if you BIOS has the settings to do that. It's just a metter of playing around with FSB and memory multiplier.

Note that some motherboards allow you to overclock CPU and memory separately.

Artifacts are caused by video cards, not CPU's nor memory.
 

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1357, 1358, 1359, 1360, 1361, 1362, 1363, 1364, 1365, 1366, 1367, whatever you want...


But then there's the timings:


Memory latency, or timings, like the number 10 in CL 10, are the length of time it takes the memory to complete a step in what it has to do. That "time" is measured in "clock ticks" (1T = 1 clock tick), ie CL 10 takes 10 clock ticks to complete before the memory can move on to it's next operation. The length of one clock tick is the speed at which the memory is running. 1800 MHz memory has a clock tick length of one 1,800,000,000th of a second (1,800,000,000 clock ticks per second), so the CL step takes 10 x 1/1,800,000,000 seconds.

A stick of memory always takes the same amount of time to complete it's CL step (or any other step) no matter what speed it is running. If you run the above memory stick faster, say 2400 MHz, it still takes 10 x 1/1,800,000,000 seconds to complete the CL step, but each clock tick is now 1/2,400,000,000 of a second, so it now it would take more clock ticks to complete the CL step. Namely, 24/18 times 10 (for CL step) or 13.3 clock ticks (10 times 24/18 clock ticks). But, alas, that has to be rounded to to CL 14 as memory can't use partial clock ticks.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@billbartuska You forgot about CPU/NB Frequency (or IMC clock) and Hyper Transport multiplier
How does CPU-NB frequency relate to Ram? I have raised it without considering Ram as I've read it increases CPU performance. There's only FSB and FSB/DRAM ratio in my bios under Ram settings.

Also, what are the recommended speeds for HT?

Thanks for the replies guys.
 

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I didn't include a lot of things...........

You have to understand that there are no "standard" setting for overclocking. If there were they would be published and there would be no need for forums like this one.

Every CPU is different
Every motherboard is different
Every stick of ram is different

So...He who tries the most goes the fastest.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You have to understand that there are no "standard" setting for overclocking.
I understand that, but my main issue is lack of knowledge how things inside work. I agree, there isn't such a thing as a=x, b=y, c=z, but I hope with some basic understanding of correlations inside the PC to ease my process.
 

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