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Returning air in rad and confused

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I put my water-cooling together in March, pressure test no leaks lovely jubbly. My memory and CPU loop keeps getting air pockets in the radiator which sits at the top of the case, Alphacool XT30 V2. I have a Corsair XD5 that sits below, then to my memory, then the CPU TechN which has no bubbles then to the radiator and back to the XD5. I only notice as the space I leave in the reservoir 2/3 inch reduces to 1/2 inch, give the case shake and tilt and bubbles appear from the radiator. I have my GPU on a separate loop and don't suffer the same problem at all, however the radiators 2x480 XT45 are on the front vertical and the XD5 is mounted on the radiator. Any ideas how to prevent this I'll appreciate.
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Top of CPU block no bubbles
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Do you have a bigger picture of your entire loop?

Is that a crack in your CPU block?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you have a bigger picture of your entire loop?

Is that a crack in your CPU block?
I saw that, but it doesn't leak under pressure. I also didn't do them up tight.
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Is that a crack?
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I don't see any bubbles that would concern me. Tiny bubbles are normal.

HOWEVER, I would make some recommendations.

First, flip both radiators around.

Second, make one loop.

But at least flip the radiators and run the loop like the attached photo (don't hate the Paint).
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Third, congratulations, your build is officially the first build ever that I've seen with a side mounted sound card. Well done!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Is that a crack?
View attachment 2573455

I don't see any bubbles that would concern me. Tiny bubbles are normal.

HOWEVER, I would make some recommendations.

First, flip both radiators around.

Second, make one loop.

But at least flip the radiators and run the loop like the attached photo (don't hate the Paint).
View attachment 2573456

Third, congratulations, your build is officially the first build ever that I've seen with a side mounted sound card. Well done!
It could be a scratch when I used a pipe wrench to do up the fitting. Those minor cracks around the fitting I reckon are thermal stress cracks, CPU gets very warm when pulling 275 watts.

I planned two loops as I thought the GPU and CPU would create a lot of heat and I didn't want the GPU and CPU to cook the RAM and make them error. As it is the GPU doesn't get hot 45-50'C, water 30-35'C on two rads and that loop is fine. The CPU can get warm when stressed with cinebench @ 82'C, while gaming it's perfectly fine around 60'C, water about 37'C. Somehow the air pocket in the reservoir is getting into the rad, I'll have to stop getting my CPU so hot and see what happens.

That sound card is on my little HTPC media thing 5700G, it makes my Sony XM2 headphones sound a lot better than onboard sound.
 

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Your front rad is probably trapping air since it is the highest point of the loop. When you bleed the system you'll want to run the pump full speed to try to push the air out of the rad as much as possible. You can rotate the system around during bleeding (if possible) to try to trap the air in the res. If that doesn't do the trick you can switch the CPU rad to the front and rotate it so in/out are at the top as others have suggested. Or you can leave it alone, it will just take a long time to bleed all the air out.
 

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It could be a scratch when I used a pipe wrench to do up the fitting. Those minor cracks around the fitting I reckon are thermal stress cracks, CPU gets very warm when pulling 275 watts.

I planned two loops as I thought the GPU and CPU would create a lot of heat and I didn't want the GPU and CPU to cook the RAM and make them error. As it is the GPU doesn't get hot 45-50'C, water 30-35'C on two rads and that loop is fine. The CPU can get warm when stressed with cinebench @ 82'C, while gaming it's perfectly fine around 60'C, water about 37'C. Somehow the air pocket in the reservoir is getting into the rad, I'll have to stop getting my CPU so hot and see what happens.

That sound card is on my little HTPC media thing 5700G, it makes my Sony XM2 headphones sound a lot better than onboard sound.
You can keep two loops. While your logic is a little off (a single loop would generally be better), it's not a big deal. But turning the radiators around is. As mentioned, the front radiator probably has a sizable air bubble at the top. Radiators should generally not be run upsidedown (except for AIOs because you want the air to be trapped in the rad). It will also help a lot with the GPU loop flow.
 

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It could be a scratch when I used a pipe wrench to do up the fitting. Those minor cracks around the fitting I reckon are thermal stress cracks, CPU gets very warm when pulling 275 watts.

I planned two loops as I thought the GPU and CPU would create a lot of heat and I didn't want the GPU and CPU to cook the RAM and make them error. As it is the GPU doesn't get hot 45-50'C, water 30-35'C on two rads and that loop is fine. The CPU can get warm when stressed with cinebench @ 82'C, while gaming it's perfectly fine around 60'C, water about 37'C. Somehow the air pocket in the reservoir is getting into the rad, I'll have to stop getting my CPU so hot and see what happens.

That sound card is on my little HTPC media thing 5700G, it makes my Sony XM2 headphones sound a lot better than onboard sound.
That's actually a thing? I assumed that was too tight on the fittings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You can keep two loops. While your logic is a little off (a single loop would generally be better), it's not a big deal. But turning the radiators around is. As mentioned, the front radiator probably has a sizable air bubble at the top. Radiators should generally not be run upsidedown (except for AIOs because you want the air to be trapped in the rad). It will also help a lot with the GPU loop flow.
I've bled the two rads on the front, and it made the plumbing a bit easier and tidier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That's actually a thing? I assumed that was too tight on the fittings.
I was trying to remember last night how I did it, I used long nose pliers to gently tighten the top one. I did have a straight fitting there and decided to swap if for a 45 degree. It's not super tight, just nipped up finger tight sort of. The other fitting is probably tighter.
 

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I was trying to remember last night how I did it, I used long nose pliers to gently tighten the top one. I did have a straight fitting there and decided to swap if for a 45 degree. It's not super tight, just nipped up finger tight sort of. The other fitting is probably tighter.
It could be a scratch when I used a pipe wrench to do up the fitting. Those minor cracks around the fitting I reckon are thermal stress cracks, CPU gets very warm when pulling 275 watts.
The best way to wreck your stuff is to use a wrench to tighten fittings. Especially threading into acrylic or similar.

Those are likely stress cracks around the fitting. Not from thermal cycling. The only times I have heard about using a tool to tighten a PC water cooling fittings, were people looking for help because they did so.

I have used compression fittings in all my water builds. Well over 20 water cooled systems in the past 12 or so years. Not one have I ever needed a tool to tighten. Only go as tight as you can get it with fingers. I have never had a fitting leak thru threads.

The only times I have used a tool on a compression fitting, is when tightening keeper ring around tubing. I hold the base with a thin SATA cable. Then use a second cable to tighten keeper ring around tubing.

And as others suggested, flip that front rad so the air can bleed. If you are bent on having the tubing running to bottom of rad, use a UT60 rad or similar. With a UT60, it can be easily bled.
 

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I was trying to remember last night how I did it, I used long nose pliers to gently tighten the top one. I did have a straight fitting there and decided to swap if for a 45 degree. It's not super tight, just nipped up finger tight sort of. The other fitting is probably tighter.
Yep. That could be what did it.

When you have leverage, such as you get from a tool, you create far more torque than you realize.
It's probably nothing more than cosmetic and it is not the cause of your loop trapping air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The best way to wreck your stuff is to use a wrench to tighten fittings. Especially threading into acrylic or similar.

Those are likely stress cracks around the fitting. Not from thermal cycling. The only times I have heard about using a tool to tighten a PC water cooling fittings, were people looking for help because they did so.

I have used compression fittings in all my water builds. Well over 20 water cooled systems in the past 12 or so years. Not one have I ever needed a tool to tighten. Only go as tight as you can get it with fingers. I have never had a fitting leak thru threads.

The only times I have used a tool on a compression fitting, is when tightening keeper ring around tubing. I hold the base with a thin SATA cable. Then use a second cable to tighten keeper ring around tubing.

And as others suggested, flip that front rad so the air can bleed. If you are bent on having the tubing running to bottom of rad, use a UT60 rad or similar. With a UT60, it can be easily bled.
I quickly changed my idea of using a wrench to tighten on the cpu block as I noticed I was damaging the acrylic and didn't want to crack it and they were obviously too big, I loosely used long nose pliers to compress the O-ring using my finger and thumb to simulate finger tight, I did try using my fingers but was unable to tighten it and I could get my nail between the block and fitting, I wanted it screwed all the way down and as a £1800 GPU sits under it I wasn't going to risk it. There was no damage or cracks around that fitting, I checked with a macro camera and it was perfect, I'm confident if I had over tightened the crack would be worse, deep and surrounding the hole. The problem with plexiglass is it looks great but probably not the best material for the job as it's very hard and brittle and it can crack if thermal stressed too much. I have been a bit stupid stressing the crap out of my CPU with temps bouncing from 30 up to 90'C quickly several times. If the crack worsen I'll go for a metal block. I don't go mad with the wrench either, I'm not torquing them. To end this I just checked to see if I can undo it with my fingers and yes it turned anti-clockwise a smidge, so it's thermal stress NOT over tightened.

My GPU loop doesn't have any problems of air pockets in the radiator or anything, the level never changes in the reservoir, ever. I does on my CPU and memory loop and I can't slide out the drawer to get at the port to bleed as I made a tube too short, I tried a couple of month ago, I've had to shake and tilt my case twice to move the air from the top rad in six months. Everything is tight no leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yep. That could be what did it.

When you have leverage, such as you get from a tool, you create far more torque than you realize.
It's probably nothing more than cosmetic and it is not the cause of your loop trapping air.
I checked a few minutes ago, it was not tight to undo, finger tight.

I'm not a kid, I'm an engineer. I'm not cranking up wheel nuts lol
 

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The best way to wreck your stuff is to use a wrench to tighten fittings. Especially threading into acrylic or similar.

Those are likely stress cracks around the fitting. Not from thermal cycling. The only times I have heard about using a tool to tighten a PC water cooling fittings, were people looking for help because they did so.

I have used compression fittings in all my water builds. Well over 20 water cooled systems in the past 12 or so years. Not one have I ever needed a tool to tighten. Only go as tight as you can get it with fingers. I have never had a fitting leak thru threads.

The only times I have used a tool on a compression fitting, is when tightening keeper ring around tubing. I hold the base with a thin SATA cable. Then use a second cable to tighten keeper ring around tubing.

And as others suggested, flip that front rad so the air can bleed. If you are bent on having the tubing running to bottom of rad, use a UT60 rad or similar. With a UT60, it can be easily bled.
While yes true but Aquacomputer's inline temperature sensors has its fittings shaped for spanners. Not wide but where mine was once, I couldn't get my fingers in to turn it a half turn to fully seal it. Had to use an adjustable spanner once that could only reach in where it was. No crazy force was applied otherwise I would have needed to dismantle a section of the loop to get into it.
 
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