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My case temp is about 10c above my room temp. I don't know if this is normal, or too hot, but I thought of something. My rig has its back to a window, which is open a lot of the time, because I like the cold. Would reversing my airflow help my temps? If the rear fan was an intake, it would pull in cold air from the window, and my front fan would blow it out.

Anyone know what kind of effects this would have, before I try it?
 

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If you are pulling in colder air from the back and running it though the case to the front fan then it should cool better then now.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by amped

My case temp is about 10c above my room temp. I don't know if this is normal, or too hot, but I thought of something. My rig has its back to a window, which is open a lot of the time, because I like the cold. Would reversing my airflow help my temps? If the rear fan was an intake, it would pull in cold air from the window, and my front fan would blow it out.

Anyone know what kind of effects this would have, before I try it?

Hi Amped,

That's a good question. The normal school of thought is that warm air rises, so cooler air comes into the lower portion of the case and the hotter air is expelled out the top and rear of the case. What you'd be trying to do is force the flow from the top to the bottom. I think your psu would like it, sense it's just above the upper fan that currently exhausts, but would now blow cooler air in. The cpu and possibly the ram would see some cooling effects.

The down side is that with Lian Li cases the filters are on the inlet fan at the bottom of the case and can't be moved to the top fan. You'd have to purchase an aftermarket filter to keep clean air going into the case.

Have you thought about this. Try using the top fan as you stated and leave the bottom fan alone. This would create plenty of flow into the case, but nowhere for it to go, unless you have a blowhole type fan at the top. This idea is what I used with my V-1200 Lian Li case. I used both fans to provide flow into the case and used a small quite panflow at the top to create flow to the top of the case. My case temps 1 to 2degC above my room temps. I like that a lot!
As for your real question: You can try it, because what do you have to lose! The fans in the Lian Li cases are easy to remove, because of those plastic push pins. I just would be worried about dust and dirt getting into the case, if you know what I mean.

I hope this helped, :)
 

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I have the silver version of your case and I have the rear fan blowing in and the top blowhole blowing out. However I did this for my WC set up. The front fan is ducted through to a rad and does not vent to the interior. I used acrylic ducting to project the air from the rear fan directly at my Northbridge and RAM.

Since I use large aluminum heatsinks for the drives my need for air is low.

I am sure your idea would lower temps, but it would help to shunt the intake air away from the PSU fan and onto your HS or whatever you are most concerned with cooling--the way the rear fan is located it would simply cycle right through the PSU before doing much to cool the rest of your components.

If you have not added a fan to the side panel yet, or to the the blowhole I would recommend doing so. When I was aircooling with that case I put one directly over the CPU on the side panel and used a PVC dryer vent reducer cut to fit to force cool air directly on the Zalman 7700 AlCu. The rear fan at that time helped pull the HS exhaust out--my mobo temps were immediately reduced as well as a significant increase in my ability to OC...
 
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