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ლ(╹ε╹ლ)
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8,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since we've been discussing it the "[Available] Nixeus MODA v2 Mechanical Keyboard" thread, I figured I'd create a thread that is more appropriate and that can evolve with time. This thread might also be useful as a sticky eventually.
 

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Mouse reviewer
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3,097 Posts
Continuing from other thread here then:<br><div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1573418/available-nixeus-moda-v2-mechanical-keyboard#post_24457511" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>RagingCain</strong> <a href="/t/1573418/available-nixeus-moda-v2-mechanical-keyboard#post_24457511"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
I disagree with the whole rushed point of view. It goes up when it's ready. Assuming you need all four reviews simultaneously ready for publishing is only one way of doing it.<br><br>
If we going to do things our way, we have to think outside the box.<br><b><i>If only one review is up, one gets posted, then when a 2nd or 3rd, the main review is updated, and the 2nd and 3rd reviews also get published.</i></b><br><br>
That means every product could have multiple reviews over time. Also means not every product review will launch with the multi person review aspect, but considering one review is the bare minimum, that would put us leagues over what others are doing.</div>
</div>
<br>
That's what I meant, having only one sample for all reviewers defeats the purpose of "multiple reviews in one" but it would work like you say for single reviews. So my proposal is to do the "multi review" when it fits and otherwise do reviews as normal, maybe do the "multi review" later on when all are in or update as they come.
 

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ლ(╹ε╹ლ)
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8,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I think we try to keep it as simple as possible logistic side. All the management of shipping would need to be done. Also, who would get to keep it at the end? I think it would cause more trouble than anything.<br><br>
I think that if a company supplies one product that we said we were able to review, then it's first come first serve. Keep in mind, since we're a bunch aiming towards the same goals, it does not necessarily mean that another reviewer would be left out. If I receive a video card and I have a few things that I would like a bit of help, an opinion or something of sorts, I would ask another member of the team to help with the subject at hand.<br><br>
If we give ourselves credit with a small shout out an the end of the review, then it would be beneficial for everyone, not only would we be forming bonds as friends with similar interests and goals, but it would help if one day we all meet at SF!<br><br>
This leaves us with a few "types" of reviews we've spotted so far. I think a variety of those would be great and less monotonous for everyone.<br><br>
One product to review<br>
- One reviewer<br>
- One review<br><br>
Multiple products (like the Nixeus Keyboard)<br>
- Multiple reviews with one thread having a small summary of all of them released as they're done.<br>
- Multiple reviewers<br><br>
Multiple products (<b>unlike</b> the Nixeus keyboard,)<br>
- Multiple reviews, but all tossed up (properly of course) into one thread and posted by management.<br>
- Multiple reviewers<br><br>
Does this seem about accurate? Should I add these to the OP?
 

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Premium Member
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22,004 Posts
Thanks for the great discussion guys. I'll stay out of the way for the most part, but, I do want to make sure to point out that one of the primary distinctions between Overclock Labs and regular old Sponsored Reviews is that product samples provided via the Labs program are not intended to be kept by reviewers - they will most typically be given away to the community, or in some special cases, may be added to the fleet of hardware used on-site at the eventual Lab in San Francisco. We haven't strictly ruled out Labs reviewers ever getting to keep hardware, but, cases where we can allow that would be the exception rather than the rule (perhaps a case where you can justify keeping a specific piece of hardware to expand the fleet of complimentary items you can review or something like this, but it would be handled case-by-case regardless). Make sense?
 

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Software Developer
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7,228 Posts
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_50#post_24458603" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chipp</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_50#post_24458603"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Thanks for the great discussion guys. I'll stay out of the way for the most part, but, I do want to make sure to point out that one of the primary distinctions between Overclock Labs and regular old Sponsored Reviews is that product samples provided via the Labs program are not intended to be kept by reviewers - they will most typically be given away to the community, or in some special cases, may be added to the fleet of hardware used on-site at the eventual Lab in San Francisco. We haven't strictly ruled out Labs reviewers ever getting to keep hardware, but, cases where we can allow that would be the exception rather than the rule (perhaps a case where you can justify keeping a specific piece of hardware to expand the fleet of complimentary items you can review or something like this, but it would be handled case-by-case regardless). Make sense?</div>
</div>
<br>
Makes sense to me, I think it was implicit we aren't going to be keeping the goodies, save for special considerations or something.<br><br>
I like the idea of shipping to one another in order to get multiple-reviews.
 

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ლ(╹ε╹ლ)
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8,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24458603" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chipp</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24458603"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Thanks for the great discussion guys. I'll stay out of the way for the most part, but, I do want to make sure to point out that one of the primary distinctions between Overclock Labs and regular old Sponsored Reviews is that product samples provided via the Labs program are not intended to be kept by reviewers - they will most typically be given away to the community, or in some special cases, may be added to the fleet of hardware used on-site at the eventual Lab in San Francisco. We haven't strictly ruled out Labs reviewers ever getting to keep hardware, but, cases where we can allow that would be the exception rather than the rule (perhaps a case where you can justify keeping a specific piece of hardware to expand the fleet of complimentary items you can review or something like this, but it would be handled case-by-case regardless). Make sense?</div>
</div>
<br>
I think then it would be really important to list those details in the review opportunity threads. Also, how will the return shipping to the lab work? I know it's still early in this program, but the more details we can perfect from the start, the better structured we'll be moving forward.<br><div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24459611" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>RagingCain</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24459611"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Makes sense to me, I think it was implicit we aren't going to be keeping the goodies, save for special considerations or something.<br><br>
I like the idea of shipping to one another in order to get multiple-reviews.</div>
</div>
<br>
I think it's a great idea also, I just think it needs to be planned out before doing so. Some items need a good deal of time to test.
 

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Mouse reviewer
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3,097 Posts
Yeah, it's quite important to know how we are supposed to ship it back, because if we take the monitor as an example the shipping to the US for me is quite expensive, between 35 and 70€ depending on weight...<br>
For small items like mice or keyboards it would be 16€ which would be ok, but that would still be a lot over the year with 4 items to review.
 

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ლ(╹ε╹ლ)
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8,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24459611" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>RagingCain</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24459611"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Makes sense to me, I think it was implicit we aren't going to be keeping the goodies, save for special considerations or something.<br><br>
I like the idea of shipping to one another in order to get multiple-reviews.</div>
</div>
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24459848" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Ino.</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24459848"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Yeah, it's quite important to know how we are supposed to ship it back, because if we take the monitor as an example the shipping to the US for me is quite expensive, between 35 and 70€ depending on weight...<br>
For small items like mice or keyboards it would be 16€ which would be ok, but that would still be a lot over the year with 4 items to review.</div>
</div>
<br>
It would also not be as interesting for some if it ends up costing them money to do reviews.
 

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Premium Member
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22,004 Posts
In either case, OCN will cover shipping costs (either providing you with a label to use or simply sending cash via PayPal). Nobody will be on the hook for any logistical costs related to Labs reviews.
 

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AMDiggity!
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1,060 Posts
I'm mostly concerned about a standardized template. Technology-specific test plans and methodologies will develop over time
 

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ლ(╹ε╹ლ)
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8,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24460786" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Archea47</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions#post_24460786"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
I'm mostly concerned about a standardized template. Technology-specific test plans and methodologies will develop over time</div>
</div>
<br>
This too. A template or format so all our reviews look at least a bit alike.
 

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Banned
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16,364 Posts
A loose template would be good.. just enough to form the skeleton of the structure. This way posted content will all have similar flow regardless of writer.<br><br>
Name<br>
Product<br>
Review type<br>
Body<br>
Tests<br>
Conclusions<br>
Pros/cons & or verdict<br>
Photos, suggestions<br><br>
**also - a lot of review sites have different tiers of 'approval or endorsement' ... ie- what will it mean if a product meets criteria to earn a "golden flame" ..etc
 

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On The Red Team
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1,651 Posts
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24460786" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false">Quote:
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Archea47</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24460786"><img alt="View Post" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm mostly concerned about a standardized template. Technology-specific test plans and methodologies will develop over time</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24546796" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false">Quote:
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Duality92</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24546796"><img alt="View Post" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br>
This too. A template or format so all our reviews look at least a bit alike.</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24583633" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false">Quote:
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>CL3P20</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24583633"><img alt="View Post" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
A loose template would be good.. just enough to form the skeleton of the structure. This way posted content will all have similar flow regardless of writer.<br><br>
Name<br>
Product<br>
Review type<br>
Body<br>
Tests<br>
Conclusions<br>
Pros/cons & or verdict<br>
Photos, suggestions<br><br>
**also - a lot of review sites have different tiers of 'approval or endorsement' ... ie- what will it mean if a product meets criteria to earn a "golden flame" ..etc</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>Yup, yup, and yup. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Maybe different descriptions of flame/fire/heat: sizzling, hot, burning, blistering, flaming, etc.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Should we include a grade/score into the mix?  10/10, or X/X flames? </p>
<p> </p>
<p>We could also have other endorsements/awards for products.  HardwareCanucks comes to mind with Dam Innovative, or Dam Good Deal, etc.</p>
 

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Banned
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16,364 Posts
<p>May help to first determine what criteria are deemed 'important' for different hardware categories..  ie:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>GPU criteria:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Performance</p>
<p>Value</p>
<p>Build Q</p>
<p>OC</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>**Now, say each one of those categories carries a max of '5' points based on the outcome of the review..  the point total could reflect the 'overall forum score' which would translate into "OCN Flames"</p>
<p> </p>
<p>0-5 points = 1 flame</p>
<p>6-10 = 2 flame</p>
<p>11-15 = 3 flame</p>
<p>16-20 = 4 flame</p>
<p>21-25 = 5 flame</p>
<p> </p>
<p>something like:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Performance - 4/5</p>
<p>Value - 5/5</p>
<p>Build Q - 4/5</p>
<p>OC - 2/5</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Forum score = 15/25  or 3 OCN flames awarded</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> Initially I thought it may be overly complicated... but something along these lines will allow a level field with room for products to be adequately compared.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> Thoughts??</p>
 

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ლ(╹ε╹ლ)
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8,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/10#post_24609836" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>CL3P20</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/10#post_24609836"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
May help to first determine what criteria are deemed 'important' for different hardware categories..  ie:<br><br>
GPU criteria:<br><br>
Performance<br>
Value<br>
Build Q<br>
OC<br><br><br>
**Now, say each one of those categories carries a max of '5' points based on the outcome of the review..  the point total could reflect the 'overall forum score' which would translate into "OCN Flames"<br><br>
0-5 points = 1 flame<br>
6-10 = 2 flame<br>
11-15 = 3 flame<br>
16-20 = 4 flame<br>
21-25 = 5 flame<br><br>
something like:<br><br>
Performance - 4/5<br>
Value - 5/5<br>
Build Q - 4/5<br>
OC - 2/5<br><br>
Forum score = 15/25  or 3 OCN flames awarded<br><br><br>
 Initially I thought it may be overly complicated... but something along these lines will allow a level field with room for products to be adequately compared.<br><br>
 Thoughts??</div>
</div>
<br>
This is basically how I evaluate my suppliers at work. The difference is that I don't award the same amount of points per criteria. I have my evaluation for on around 10 questions, totalling 150 points. This in turn makes my suppliers score more points if they're ISO 9001 than if they answer yes to keeping their than letting me perform an audit at their facility.<br><br>
I think it's a great idea.
 

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On The Red Team
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1,651 Posts
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24609836" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false">Quote:
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>CL3P20</strong> <a href="/t/1575190/reviewing-methods-and-general-suggestions/0_20#post_24609836"><img alt="View Post" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br>
 
<p>May help to first determine what criteria are deemed 'important' for different hardware categories..  ie:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>GPU criteria:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Performance</p>
<p>Value</p>
<p>Build Q</p>
<p>OC</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>**Now, say each one of those categories carries a max of '5' points based on the outcome of the review..  the point total could reflect the 'overall forum score' which would translate into "OCN Flames"</p>
<p> </p>
<p>0-5 points = 1 flame</p>
<p>6-10 = 2 flame</p>
<p>11-15 = 3 flame</p>
<p>16-20 = 4 flame</p>
<p>21-25 = 5 flame</p>
<p> </p>
<p>something like:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Performance - 4/5</p>
<p>Value - 5/5</p>
<p>Build Q - 4/5</p>
<p>OC - 2/5</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Forum score = 15/25  or 3 OCN flames awarded</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> Initially I thought it may be overly complicated... but something along these lines will allow a level field with room for products to be adequately compared.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> Thoughts??</p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>Sounds alright to me.  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I just purchased one of these guys from NewEgg:  <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835856022" target="_blank">http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835856022</a></p>
<p> </p>
<p>For $80 with a potential $20 MIR it would appear to be a good deal...Plus it matches the redness of my HTPC <img alt=":)" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="">.  I think I'm going to do a test run review and everyone can throw some constructive criticism at it to help mold a template. </p>
 

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On The Red Team
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1,651 Posts
<h1><em><strong>Constructive criticism welcome...here's a test run for a review</strong></em></h1>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Packaging & Manual</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Pretty standard for what I’ve come to expect from a CPU AIO cooler</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Box looks nice and is sturdy; nothing tore when opening it up.  It also did a perfect job of keeping the contents protected; no damage or leaks present.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The manual has quality pictures, with good detail, that are easy to interpret.  I don’t think even an amateur would have an issue deciphering the</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">instructions to properly install this cooler. (PDF for install can be found <a href="http://deepcool.com/download/pdf/CAPTAIN240.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>)</span></p>
<p> </p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>El Capitan Packaging</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651306/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651306" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651306/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651307/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651307" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651307/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651308/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651308" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651308/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651309/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651309" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651309/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651310/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651310" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651310/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Included Components:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The first thing I immediately notice is the texture/feel of the fans.  At first I thought the whole fan shroud was rubber coated for noise suppression.  But, then I gave the fan a little twist and it seems the whole fan is a firm, yet flexible, rubber.  The red center ring/hub of the fan shroud is a traditional material which I’m presuming is what gives it rigidity.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Giving the fan a few silky smooth spins by hand created a surprising gust of air flow.  The fans appear to be perfectly circular and centered as there was no shimmy or wobble that I could see. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The spec decal on the rear of the fan has the DeepCool Gamer Storm logo.  The decal is a thicker textured plastic unlike most fans that have a very thin sticker.  The specs listed are:  GF120 12V – 3.12W – 0.26A (all fan/AIO specs can be seen <a href="http://www.deepcool.com/product/gamerstorm/2014-09/6_1013.shtml" target="_blank">here</a>).</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The fan connectors measure in at 12” on the dot, with 10.75” usable if you exclude the PWM connector and heatshrink.  The wires are grey/black, with some mesh loom on them that is held securely on both ends by black heatshrink; they will be in stealth mode no matter how you run them.</span></p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Fans n' Stuff</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651311/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651311" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651311/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651312/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651312" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651312/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651313/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651313" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651313/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">They also include a 4-port PWM fan hub with a 16.75” long cable; you get a solid 15.25” of usable length.  The first port on the hub, closest to cable, is white.  I’m not sure why as the manual does not include any info, or show that port being used first.  The hub has some protective film applied on the ultra smooth bottom where the separately packaged double-sided tape can be used.  There is a small hole in the center of the hub which (a quick check of the directions unveils another great idea) allows the use of a small (included) zip-tie to mount the hub.  The hub does not include an auxiliary power connection, so you will be limited to what your board can supply through a single fan header; this is unlikely to be an issue with a modern motherboard.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">They also include another 4-pin fan extension cable that is 16.75”, 13.75” usable, long for those of you with large cases.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The fans are advertised as having detachable impellers, so we must give this a look.  They took more force than I was anticipating to pull them off as I needed to use both hands.  They come off with a loud pop to expose the guts below and reattach with a satisfying click so you know they are seated correctly.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Serviceable Fans!</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651317/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651317" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651317/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The shaft is shiny and smooth carrying a light coat of thick slipper oil. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651320/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651320" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651320/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I haven’t looked at many fans under the hood, but it certainly looks like they used quality copper in tight windings</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651321/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651321" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651321/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">They are detachable for maintenance purposes, and if you were ever going to need to oil them I would suggest some 3-In-One.  I have used this countless times on worn out fans to bring them back to life. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651322/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651322" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651322/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">It is a little thin so you must be careful when applying it.  One little drop transferred from the tip of the bottle to the top of the shaft should be plenty.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651323/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651323" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651323/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Fans with detachable impellers typically carry a price premium.  For them to come bundled in such a fairly priced AIO is one more way that DeepCool is differentiating themselves from their vast competition.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">So far I am very impressed with the quality of the fans and related items.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Onto the mounting hardware!</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">This kit should cool just about any AMD or Intel CPU you’ve got; even 2011-v3.  This is great as some brands/models only include one bracket type…if you change camps, then you’re stuck buying a bracket kit or an entirely different cooler. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651324/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651324" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651324/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The parts bags have numbers on them that coincide with the hardware’s assigned # in the instructions.  I must applaud DeepCool for catering to novices, as well as making things just a little easier for seasoned veterans.  They also have included a Gamer Storm badge for your case if you want to flaunt it.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651326/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651326" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651326/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">DeepCool’s simplistic trend continues with the mounting backplate.  One side for AMD, and with a quick flip it is oriented for Intel.  Some of the other hardware is also shared between the two camps; screws, nuts, washers,etc.  You must choose Intel or AMD for the two front pump brackets though.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651327/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651327" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651327/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Looking like a great setup from DeepCool so far and we haven’t even gotten to the meat and potatoes of their cooling solution.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Bring on the pump & radiator!</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">With the pump/radiator we come to the first thing that I do not care for, and that is the plastic corrugated tubing.  This is likely the same tubing Cooler Master uses for their Seidon series AIOs, and potentially what was on the first gen Corsair AIO’s; which were prone to cracking/leaking.  Admittedly, the original H100 was from many moons ago, and this issue has likely been resolved since then…but I still don’t like the stiffness of this tubing.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651328/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651328" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651328/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">With that out of the way we can get back to more praise.  The thing that obviously stands out more than anything is the pump/heatsink.  The ‘steam punk’ styling is pretty sweet and a welcome change to a market that has been quite stagnant in the looks department.  This obviously will be an area divided by opinion, but if nothing else DeepCool has caught people’s attention. </span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The 3-pin power connector is generously lengthy at 10.75”, giving you options if CPU/OPT headers are already taken. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651329/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651329" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651329/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The next thing that jumped out at me is the texture of the copper hotplate; the smudge you see in the pre-applied thermal paste was my doing.  Most heatsinks/waterblocks are machined and polished to some degree.  DeepCool has gone a different route though, which appears to be cast/molded due to its very fine/uniform texture.  I presume this as less than ideal due to more area relying on thermal paste to fill voids…but we shan’t judge a book by its cover.  The last obvious difference are the security screws that are used to hold the pump/heatsink together; I’ve taken a couple Asetek pumps apart with a traditional hex bit.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The barbs on the pump housing swivel easily enough, but I would chalk the resistance in movement up to the 12” of stiff plastic tubing. </span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651331/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651331" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651331/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Moving along to the radiator we have a nice surprise…DeepCool’s radiator has a fill port on it! Granted it has a warranty void sticker, but if you wanted to replace the plastic tubing, you will have a much easier time refilling than if it wasn’t present.  This makes me very happy, because I’m not sure how long that plastic tubing is going to be hanging around on mine :-D </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651332/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651332" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651332/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">We have 14 veins and roughly 10 fins per inch.  The fins are pretty uniform collectively with them only slightly off keel within the last ¾” before either end of the radiator.  Speaking of the H100, DeepCool’s radiator choice looks awfully familiar…yup, pretty much identical with matching vein count and FPI; the fill port is the lone exception.</span></p>
<p><br>
 </p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Radiator</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651335/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651335" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651335/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651336/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651336" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651336/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I think that’s about it for examining the product.  I can only hope that it performs as good as it looks so far.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Installation:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Any proper cooler installation starts with removing existing thermal paste.  ArctiClean is cheap and does an exquisite job of getting things squeaky clean. <span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Clean It 1st</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651338/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651338" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651338/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651339/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651339" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651339/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Grab your bracket, studs and black plastic end caps. </span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"></span></p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Rear Mount Bracket</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651340/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651340" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651340/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651341/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651341" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651341/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651342/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651342" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651342/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-size:14px;">The studs wisely have a little notch in them so they won’t wiggle around on you.  Then the plastic caps fit over the arms of the bracket and snap into place.  This is yet another smart feature that makes installation a breeze.  Once all your caps are locked on, it’s time to install the bracket to the back of the motherboard.  A quick tip for bracket installation is to use some electrical tape to hold it in place.  Cut a couple small pieces and roll it around itself so you have an adhesive cylinder.  Put this on your backing plate, and press it to the backside of the motherboard to keep it from sliding/falling out of place on you. </span></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651344/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651344" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651344/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Next you will need the rubber washers.  These are simply installed on the mounting studs to eliminate any chances of vibration noise from the pump.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651346/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651346" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651346/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Now grab your CPU brackets of choice and the 4 small screws.  The brackets sit very nicely onto the pump housing.  This allows you to hold the pump with one hand and screw down the bracket with the other.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Now that the pump/heatsink are ready to install I would suggest getting the radiator secured, at least temporarily, if not where it will ultimately reside.  (I used 2 long screws to temporarily hold it in place because I am running the fans in a pull configuration initially)</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">With the radiator secured you can now easily get the pump/heatsink installed onto the CPU.  Once you have it resting on the 4 studs you can grab your screwdriver and the thumbscrews. (Even with the electrical tape I suggest using one hand to brace it briefly to start the thumbscrews)</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651353/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651353" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651353/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">You must take caution not to strip out these thumbscrews as they are a <em><strong>VERY</strong></em> soft metal!  Do yourself a favor and use a large flathead screwdriver.  This is easily my biggest qualm up to this point </span><img alt=":ninja:" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/ninja.gif" style=""><span style="font-size:14px;">.  They rounded out far too easily with very little force applied before they were bottomed out and completely tight.  It’s a good thing that also have the flathead slot, otherwise tightening them by hand would have been an aggravating task due to cramped working conditions.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Take a moment to admire the Steam Punk Pump in all its glory…Once again, some may think it tacky, but it’s growing on me quickly.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">At this point I removed the radiator so I can install the fans to pull air from the radiator.  I connected the pump to the CPU_OPT header.  Here I was quite pleased to find that the pump cable is just the right length to wrap all the extra slack around the base of the pump.  I don’t know if this is sheer coincidence, or by design, but it’s awesome!</span> <img alt=":thumbsups" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/thumbsupsmiley.png" style=""><span style="font-size:14px;">  I then connected the fan hub to the CPU_FAN header. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The fans went in next, and I must comment on how nice the rubber fans were in this scenario.  I was able to easily align the holes on their mounting points without the fans sliding around all over the place.  It made it much easier to juggle the radiator, fans, and a screw/screwdriver. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Another moment to scope out everything installed and it looks great.  The red ring in the middle of the fan housing is a nice touch once everything is in there.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651354/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651354" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651354/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Now connect your fans in whatever configuration works for you.  I chose to use the included fan hub as I had an exhaust fan to hook up as well.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">With everything installed it was time to fire up the system to see how it looks lit up and to get a first impression of fan noise.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Turn me on El Capitan:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Well…I’m officially sold on the looks of this DeepCool product.  Not only does it look great when it’s simply lit up, but it pulsates on/off which really kicks the swagger up a notch.  I was also pleasantly surprised by the absence of any gurgling from the loop not being filled properly…this is a rarity from my experience with numerous different AIOs. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Good for you DeepCool!</span></span> <img alt=":specool:" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/specool.gif" style=""><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-size:14px;"> The Captain looks hot and fresh…let’s just hope it keeps the devilish i7 cool and quiet</span>.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Turn Me On!</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651358/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651358" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651358/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651359/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651359" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651359/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651360/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651360" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651360/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Prior to purchasing The Captain I was running a dated Antec Kühler H2O 620.  I ditched its stock fan long ago for a Corsair SP120 HP, with their 7V resistor and set at full speed in BIOS, easily making it the noisiest fan in the case.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Firing up the Captain’s fans to full speed really made some noise, but definitely moved some air!  It’s much too loud for most people’s taste I’d imagine, but that is par for the course regarding AIO bundled fans from my experience.  Altering the fan speed to silent and the noise is exponentially better than full speed, and absolutely quieter than the SP120.  I headed into the BIOS again for normal speed, which exhibits noise ever so slightly louder than silent, yet is still much less intrusive than the single SP120.  I’m thinking Normal will be my setting of choice as it is clearly moving more air than silent with a minute increase in noise.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I did notice something odd in the BIOS when switching between Silent and Normal setting.  The fan speed reading was just over 1200 at silent, and moved up a mere 40-50 RPM on Normal.  I went and stuck my finger on the one case fan also hooked up to the hub to stop it.  BIOS reading dropped to 0 for a moment and then quickly rose to mid 800’s.  Very odd for the fan speed reading to decrease 1/3 when 1/3 of the fans have stopped moving.  The Fractal fan is hooked up to that one white connector of the hub, so my theory is that is the main header that the BIOS will read speed off of.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I wanted to alter fan settings from Windows so I turned to Gigabyte’s App Center and their SIV (system info viewer) tool.  I compared the fan speeds I had noted from the BIOS earlier to the different options in SIV; Oddly enough Gigabyte gives 4 options in the software, with only 3 in the BIOS, and doesn’t keep the terminology the same between them! <img alt=":doh:" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/doh.gif" style=""></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I soon learned with SIV installed that my motherboard automatically runs any fans plugged into CPU_FAN at Full Speed once CPU temp breaks 70C; regardless of if SIV is even running.  I ran the radiator fans off of SYS_FAN2 to bypass this ‘safety feature’.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">My suspicions were correct for the white port of the fan hub.  Whichever fan is plugged into it, is the one that will be measured in the BIOS or utility; Initially I was getting a reading from the Fractal case fan.  Once a Deep Cool fan was plugged into the white port, the speeds were the same as if it was plugged directly into a header...which are as follows:</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Silent: ~1075 RPM</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Normal: ~1250 RPM</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Full Speed: ~2100 RPM</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">One last point I would like to note, is that CPU_OPT speeds never changed while using SIV to alter all fan speeds simultaneously; a nice feature no doubt, but, all motherboards do NOT operate in this fashion!  When altering header speeds/settings you want to be sure that your water pump always stays at full speed to achieve optimal results.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>My HTPC:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Intel i7 4790k – Delidded w/ Fresh CLU under the hood</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Gigabyte G1 Gaming 5 Z97 mATX motherboard</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">G.Skill Ripjaws-X 16GB (2 x 8) 2133MHz @ 1.5V (XMP: 11-13-13-31-t2)</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">PowerColor AMD R9 290 Reference Edition – XSPC Razor water block w/ backplate</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">EVGA Super Nova 850G2 850W Gold PSU</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Toshiba Q Series 120GB SSD – Seagate Barracuda 2TB (The ‘BatDrive’) – Panasonic UJ-265 Slim Blu-Ray</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Fractal Design Node 804</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">                                                                                                                  </span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>GPU is cooled by a compact 240 loop consisting of:</strong> </span></p>
<ul><li><span style="font-size:14px;">(1) XSPC EX240</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">XSPC H2O 420 pump/res</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">Bitspower fittings and ¼” barbs</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">Tygon R3400 black 3/8” OD tubing</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">(2) SilenX Effizio Thermistor fans (pull)</span></li>
</ul><p> </p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>HTPC</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651370/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651370" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651370/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651365/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651365" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651365/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651366/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651366" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651366/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651367/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651367" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651367/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651368/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651368" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651368/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong style="font-style:normal;">Pertinent CPU Overclock Settings:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<ul><li><span style="font-size:14px;">4.6 GHz – 46 x 100</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">Offset Core Voltage – 1.100V + .070V Offset</span>
<ul><li><span style="font-size:14px;">This made for 1.260V ‘standard’ loads and 1.270V IBT load</span></li>
</ul></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">VRIN – 1.860V</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">VRIN LLC - High</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">Ring Voltage - Auto</span></li>
<li><span style="font-size:14px;">RAM Voltage: 1.5V</span></li>
</ul><p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>How I stressed the CPU:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Intel Burn Test – 10 runs – Very High RAM usage</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">IBT is about as brutal as it gets, so this is our worst case scenario.   At 4.6Ghz & 2133MHz this takes around 800 seconds, 13 minutes, to complete. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>15 min Unigine Valley Loop</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Another staple in the overclocking community’s arsenal of torture tests that was run in full screen windowed mode, max settings, 1080P</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>15 min Final Fantasy XIV Benchmark Loop</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Much less known, but this is my favorite for GPU stability testing.  Graphics are stunning and it has never let me down to find a rock solid GPU overclock.  All settings were maxed at 1080P.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>15 min Batman AK Benchmark Loop</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Last but not least is a current AAA title.  There is no loop option for this bench, so I simply re-ran the bench numerous times back-to-back until I got past the 15 minute mark.  It is roughly a 100 second bench, so it was run 8-9 times to meet my time marker.  All settings were maxed, with Nvidia settings enabled, at 1080P.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>How I tested The Captain:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">All testing was performed using the (3) fan profiles through Gigabyte’s SIV software.  Most manufacturers have software of this nature at this point, or you can adjust the fans manually through the BIOS; it was just easier to do it from the desktop.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Silent: ~1075 RPM</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Normal: ~1250 RPM</span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Full Speed: ~2100 RPM</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">All of the testing was done with all (3) fan profiles for Push, Pull, and then again in Push configuration after upgrading the thermal paste to Thermal Grizzly’s Kryonaut. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The ambient temperature in my condo stays pretty constant at 21C (+/- 1C) due to heat cycling on/off. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Each benchmark was run and then some time was given to allow CPU temps to stabilize.  With SIV installed it allowed me to force fans to full speed making downtime between benches around 6 minutes at best.  My marker for knowing I was good for another bench was the hottest core, #2, coming down to 31C (or better).  I say 'or better' due to not being able to do all the benchmarking in one fell swoop…this was spread out over nearly 2 weeks and several days/nights to gather all of the data.  To be sure hottest core temps were valid I ran the benches several times to make sure the peak temperatures recorded were not affected by the 3-5C low temps recorded due to the computer sometimes idling for extended periods. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Now without further ado…</span><img alt=":drum:" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/drum.gif" style=""></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Performance Results:</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I initially ran all of the benches in pull configuration, then in push.  Push worked better nearly unanimously, so I have both sets of data in one bar graph with the change in temperature from switching the fans to push configuration.  I say nearly unanimously because Unigine Valley acted differently than the other 3 tests…for some reason it seemed to prefer the fans in Pull.  Take a look at the charts and you will see:</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>Intel Burn Test</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651371/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651371" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651371/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 206px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>Final Fantasy XIV</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651372/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651372" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651372/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 208px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>Unigine Valley</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651373/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651373" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651373/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 209px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>Batman Arkham Knight</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651374/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651374" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651374/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 209px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">While the temperatures for IBT aren’t anything to write home about in the low 80’s, it is taming a 4790k running at 4.6GHz, with 1.270V running through it, without making a ruckus.  Gaming/Bench temperatures are quite nice never breaking 60C.  The performance is about where I anticipated it to be with the radiator/tubing combination involved.  Most other competing 240 AIOs have larger tubing, but they don’t look this good, or hit your wallet for only $80 with a potential $20 MIR.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">As it is with any cooling device your results will vary depending on your CPU, clock speeds, voltages, ambient temperature, case, airflow and tolerance for noise; amongst other factors.  For example my HTPC sits inside a space that is just large enough to accommodate the height of the case.  At some point I pondered what would happen if there was no air flow restriction, since there are only 2 inches of space above the Node.  I pulled the case out of its resting place so there was open air space above it to find a 3C drop across all cores regardless of fan speed.  It is also obviously worth reiterating that this CPU is delidded with CLU under the IHS, which is typically worth a solid 10-15C, or more, improvement in temperatures.  If you’re running an Intel chip that isn’t delidded, then you won’t likely be able to hit the same clocks/voltages for IBT, while ‘normal’ load conditions should be fine with similar settings to what I tested with.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I have one last chart to put up for a comparison of Pull in Full Speed ~VS~ Push in Silent Speed.  This really goes to show you how much better DeepCool’s combination of fans/radiator work when pushing air as opposed to pulling it through.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651378/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651378" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651378/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 204px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">There are some ‘mickeys’ in there from Valley again, but if we average the deltas, Push at Silent runs a mere 2C hotter than Pull at Full.  With an enormous reduction in noise and a miniscule temperature difference on average, running the fans in push is the way to go.  Next we shall see if the pre-applied paste is any good.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><span style="font-size:20px;"><strong>Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut</strong></span></em></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I picked up a tube of this stuff a few weeks back when I saw numerous people discussing it in the Official Delidded Thread.  The performance of it on paper looks quite good at a whopping 12.5 W/mK.  That rating puts it far ahead of tried and true pastes like Gelid GC Extreme, Noctua NT-H1, and anything from Prolimatech or Arctic Cooling.  I figured now was a great time to put this stuff through its paces, so I cleaned off the pre-applied paste and sent in the Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I quickly tested it with the Antec 620 before I installed The Captain.  In this instance it was competing against my personal favorite Xigmatek PTI-G4512, which has an advertised conductivity of only 2.5 W/mK.  Despite its low rating, if you scope some TIM round-ups you would find it typically fairs better than its advertised conductivity would lead you to believe.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">I only tested the Kryonaut for (2) 10x runs at very high load in IBT with the Antec; a very small sample set, but keep reading.   I also wanted to be certain I was getting the best results possible with The Captain, so I applied a fresh coat of CLU and tested with the Antec one more time to make sure I was giving the Kryonaut a best case scenario.  The fresh CLU helped equalize temps across cores and stopped #4 from throttling</span></p>
<p> </p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>CLU</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651385/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651385" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651385/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;">Existing CLU</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651386/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651386" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651386/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p>Existing CLU</p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651387/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651387" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651387/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;">Fresh Application</span></p>
<p> </p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651384/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651384" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651384/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 202px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">To say the above results are</span> <img alt="sleepysmiley03.gif" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/sleepysmiley03.gif"><span style="font-size:14px;"> underwhelming would be an understatement, and it didn’t get any better with The Captain.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">DeepCool’s pre-applied paste is their very own <a href="http://www.deepcool.com/product/dcoolingaccessory/2013-12/12_654.shtml" target="_blank">DeepCool Z9</a> which boasts a thermal conductivity of >4 W/mK.  I e-mailed DeepCool tech support to verify the TIM, since they only list the thermal conductivity, and was presently surprised to receive a reply in less than 6 hours!</span> <span style="font-size:14px;"> (Could mean good things if you have an issue and need some assistance.)</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Now I know you’re probably thinking that this was one application of the paste and I may not have gotten it right, however, I triple checked it spread well before buttoning everything up to run the benches.  I also ran the benches more than once to ensure the temps were correct.  I let the computer idle for 24 hours after the first batch of Full Speed benches, and benched them again to see if a little cure time could positively affect results even though it is a non-curing TIM.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Applying The Grizzly</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651390/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651390" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651390/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">The textured finish of the heatsink took a little extra effort to clean.  You can see there was still residue to remove from the rings left by the ArctiClean.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651391/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651391" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651391/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">A little dab will do.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651392/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651392" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651392/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Pretty good spread for one firm press.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651393/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651393" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651393/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Rotate the pump 180 degrees and pressed down again for even better initial coverage.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651395/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651395" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651395/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">After all the benching was done this is what it looked like.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651396/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651396" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651396/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 263px"></a></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-size:14px;">After all the benching was done this is what it looked like.</span></span></p>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong><span style="font-size:16px;">Full Speed</span></strong></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651404/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651404" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651404/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 222px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong><span style="font-size:16px;">Normal Speed</span></strong></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651405/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651405" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651405/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 220px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong><span style="font-size:16px;">Silent Speed</span></strong></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651406/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651406" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651406/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 226px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">As you can see, regardless of fan speed, swapping the TIM isn’t really worth the effort.  If we add up all the deltas and average them, the Kryonaut squeaks ahead by 0.354 degrees Celsius.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Is Thermal Grizzly a hoax?!  I don’t think so when you consider my small sample set and imperfect testing methodologies.  If you look around the web for reviews of Kryonaut, most put it in/at the top of the pack of whichever pastes it was competing against.  Some of which even measure to the first decimal since results between pastes are so close…maybe I didn’t do so bad?  Anyway…What is much harder to find, is a comparison of Kryonaut against other pastes in the particular environment it was designed for…Subzero temperatures.  I managed to find one such comparison on the HWBot forums, and when the Kryonaut is working in subzero conditions, its full potential is realized. (<a href="http://forum.hwbot.org/showthread.php?t=144109" target="_blank">LN2 Grizzly</a> comparison)</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Should you get yourself some Thermal Grizzly?  I would say that you don’t need to go out of your way to buy it and change your TIM right now, but if you’re out of your favorite TIM…then Thermal Grizzly is definitely worth a shot given the various capacities available; none of which will break the bank. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>The Bottom Line:</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><em><strong>Packaging/Manual:</strong></em>  Everything you need, nothing you don’t, with instructions that make sense.  5/5 Flames</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><em><strong>Aesthetics:</strong></em>  Everything looks and feels great.  The pump design is definitely the all-star with the fans being the runners up. 5/5 Flames</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><em><strong>Components:</strong></em>  High quality fit and finish on everything included.  I don’t care for the tubing, but the fillable radiator and serviceable fans are welcome additions.  4/5 Flames</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><em><strong>Installation:</strong></em> This was probably the easiest install that I have done for a CPU cooler in a long time, but the cheap thumb screws are going to cost The Captain a little heat.  4.5/5 Flames</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><em><strong>Performance:</strong></em>  The Captain isn’t breaking any performance records, but it delivers great performance at a great price.  4/5 Flames</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:16px;"><em><strong>Overall:</strong></em> 4.5/5 Flames </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"></span></p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;"><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651412/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2651412" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2651412/width/500/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 500px; height: 120px"></a></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">DeepCool has dove head first into the AIO watercooling scene, where they have made a good splash and caused a few waves in the looks department.  While I may not like the corrugated tubing, I would presume as long as you handle it appropriately you won’t likely run into any issues.  This only leaves the cheap thumbscrews as the standout problem with The Captain, which you can avoid by using a large flathead screwdriver. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Those issues being said, DeepCool has a fairly priced, high quality, well packaged product, with easy to interpret instructions, that is bundled with all the hardware for a painless installation into nearly any case/system, where it will flaunt some killer looks, while providing solid performance at low noise levels.  Hell, you can even resist the temptation to upgrade the thermal paste as it is well-equipped to drop right in and give you desirable results.  They sweeten the deal even further by adding the never seen fill port to the radiator, as well as fans with detachable impellers for easy maintenance.  All of this good is even further amplified by the lightning fast response I got from their tech support even if it was a simple question. </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">Add all these things up and DeepCool has a winning combination assuming it will last at least as long as its 3 year warranty would imply.</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:14px;">El Fin.</span></p>
 

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8,186 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
The only picture I would've liked added is the CPU cold plate bare after testing to see how smooth it is. This often gives a good insight of how much thought they put into it. Corsair first gens had round machining marks like an EK evo has a perfect mirror finish.<br><br>
The rest is great but I feel is bit long and exhaustive for my taste. (but that's me, I won't read too long texts between pictures)
 
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