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Newegg just agreed to cross-ship me a replacement for my CH VII since it appears to have electrical damage from the short on the back. Major, major props to newegg. I think the new one works fine now, but since it shut down a few times i just don't trust it.


What did you say to get it cross shipped?


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What did you say to get it cross shipped?


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I mean, i was just polite, and didn't really demand it, i told them i was asking them a favor, and that i've been a customer for 10 years. "I know i'm asking a lot, i'm hoping the fact i've been a customer for 10 years earns me *some* trust"
 

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@elmor
While memory is working ok (3600 15 / 3330 cl14) booting and running without problems, every time i run ryzen master i get d3 everything seems to keep working tho, voltage on auto was getting way way too high when checking ryzenmaster (1.45V even going 1.5+V) with performance 3 giving a lot of clock but asking from time to time an insane amount of V.
So i changed to auto performance with offset mode with "-" "0.1" and it s been going 1.41-1.43 max, motherboard shipped with the old bios tried the 5xxx one and the 6xxx from here, performance:temps ratio got worst, on top of that i have problem with intel burn test reporting error or crashing and aida reporting cpu temp 30C diode 90C. What should i use to monitor voltage and temps? HWiNFO Aida and RyzenMaster give different readings.
 

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@elmor:

To reiterate on what I wrote earlier: Since there have been boards for Intel CPUs with a big PLX in the same price range, the price shouldn't be a real issue to use an additional small PLX on an AM4 board.

From the specs even the following should be possible with a small PLX:



And in addition to that you could still use the PCIe 2.0 lanes from the X470 chipset ... but I guess now it is to late, and the x570 next year probably comes with PCIe 4.0.
 

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@elmor my fans are not smooth at all which isn't helping my performance or OCing - when running something like IBT they go up, then straight down, then back up a bit higher, back down, back up even higher...you get the picture

I tried adding smoothing using AISuite, but that doesn't help. It looks like at least part of it is because the temp readout are jumping about - 30c to 60c - nothing in between - down to 40c, up to 68c. Any idea what's going on?

I've got SenseMi disabled and Skew is at 0 - is that anything to do with it?

My OC was at 4GHz 1.306v LLC5 (is it wiser to reduce LLC and up volts?) 3200MTs Stilt fast settings
 

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PCIe 4.0 next year? No, Im sure not next year...
 

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@elmor, is it possible to have 4.5g for few cores while having the rest at 4.3g at the same time, for gaming purpose??
or, how to set the minimum cores' frequencies on 2700x/2600x on x470 c7h?

i follow your suggested settings on the highlight (pe=3, bclk 103.4)and i found that 2700x wont achieve 4.3g(for multi cores) and 4.5g(for signle/dual core) at the same time. either all cores are on 4.3g, or few cores 4.5g but the rest dropped to ~2g.
the gaming performance has no improvement over the oc settings of all core locked 4.3g, or even slightly worse.

on cinebench/cpuz bench, the single core performance did improved 2~4% over the oc settings of all core locked at 4.3g. so would you give me some suggestion about how to improve gamnig performance while using pe and bclk overclocking?

thanks!
 

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@elmor, is it possible to have 4.5g for few cores while having the rest at 4.3g, for gaming purpose??
or, how to set the minimum cores' frequencies on 2700x/2600x on x470 c7h?

i follow your suggested settings on the highlight (pe=3, bclk 103.4)and i found that 2700x wont achieve 4.3g(for multi cores) and 4.5g(for signle/dual core) at the same time. either all cores are on 4.3g, or few cores 4.5g but the rest dropped to ~2g.
the gaming performance has no improvement over the oc settings of all core locked 4.3g, or even slightly worse.

on cinebench/cpuz bench, the single core performance did has improved 2~4% over the oc settings of all core locked at 4.3g. so would you give me some suggestion about how to improve gamnig performance while using pe and bclk overclocking?

thanks!

@elmor can possibly correct me on this, but from what I understand and was told CPB stops working at any multiplier past 37. So if you overclock your 2700X it will not boost if your multiplier is at 38 or more. I'll see whether I can test it tonight, but unfortunately only with a X370 board.
 

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There might be a random shut down issue it’s to soon to tell. I don’t believe so but 3 of us on here have it.
Updating my bios to 0601 fixed the shutdown issue that I was running into with fan control software and that type of thing. I can't reproduce that issue like I could on 0509.
 

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Back with my Prime Pro, bios 34xx I could run my CPU at 4.2GHz, memory at 3200 fast. - So far the ram tested ok on it's own, I do need to do more testing and I need to know more about new options, but even with 4GHz, ram 3200 fast my machine crashed twice.

I've had to use the computer so not had much time for testing thoroughly yet but I will get there!

I have noticed, even at stock settings, that my mouse movements are a bit jerky at times - tested on the USB3.1 and 2.0 at btm of the board connected to my front panel. Will test rear ports later.
 

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@elmor @The Stilt

Can you guys provide a little bit more in-depth information about how exactly the new Performance Enhancer feature works? Some questions I have after reading the PDF:

- What's the difference between level 3 and level 4? (level 1 and 2 as well, for that matter)

- Balanced power plan, as in DEFAULT win 10 balanced, correct? I assume "Ryzen Balanced" is not a thing anymore?

- I assume voltage is handled automatically in this mode, and gives cores as much voltage as CPU requests?

- To continue previous question - looking at PDF the sample CPU boosted all the way to 4.5 GHz on a single core, I guess that required quite a lot of voltage? Definitely more than 1.4v which are considered "safe" among the community? Will it have any impact on the longevity of CPU, or not really, since for load of this kind current will not really be high enough, while voltage is pretty high?

If there are any specific tips you guys can give to start getting into this new kind of "overclocking" I'd really appreciate them. Thanks for another great board!
- The difference between LVL3 & 4 is the "Precision Boost Override Scalar", which for LVL3 is 1x and 10x for LVL4. Increasing the scalar value will relax the voltage limiting rules of FIT monitoring.
- Yes, Windows Balanced. The key here is to provide sufficiently low "minimum processor state" value to allow the boost to activate (25% of the cores have to reside in C6 for the ST boost to kick in fully). The Ryzen Balanced profile for 1000-series Ryzens won't work as its minimum is 90%.
- The CPU is always in control of the voltage, unless "OC-Mode" is activated (ratio set manually to higher than base ratio) or the voltage is set to "manual mode" (i.e. override from the controller side).
- The voltage curve on Zen CPUs is extremely steep at high frequencies and Pinnacle Ridge is not an exception. Based on "FIT" testing I made, up to ~1.42V (single core workloads) provides 100% silicon reliability, while up to ~1.48V provides slightly reduced reliability (similar to FIT rules set to 10x). These are actual voltages mind you ("CPU Core Voltage SVI2 TFN" in HWInfo).
 

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- The difference between LVL3 & 4 is the "Precision Boost Override Scalar", which for LVL3 is 1x and 10x for LVL4. Increasing the scalar value will relax the voltage limiting rules of FIT monitoring.

- Yes, Windows Balanced. The key here is to provide sufficiently low "minimum processor state" value to allow the boost to activate (25% of the cores have to reside in C6 for the ST boost to kick in fully). The Ryzen Balanced profile for 1000-series Ryzens won't work as its minimum is 90%.

- The CPU is always in control of the voltage, unless "OC-Mode" is activated (ratio set manually to higher than base ratio) or the voltage is set to "manual mode" (i.e. override from the controller side).

- The voltage curve on Zen CPUs is extremely steep at high frequencies and Pinnacle Ridge is not an exception. Based on "FIT" testing I made, up to ~1.42V (single core workloads) provides 100% silicon reliability, while up to ~1.48V provides slightly reduced reliability (similar to FIT rules set to 10x). These are actual voltages mind you ("CPU Core Voltage SVI2 TFN" in HWInfo).


By reliability do you mean voltages that won’t degrade the silicon? Find it unusual seeing as everything on default voltages can spike to 1.5


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I can't seem to get past 101.6 bclk. The highest I've been able to attain and stabilize is 101.6 blck with a + .0375v offset. I have my ram running at ~3252 14-14-14-34

With pe=3 set, single and dual core performance will boost to 4422mhz, while all cores can simultaneously boost to 4.2ghz.

I've tried 102 bclk with up to a + .05v offset, but that locks up almost right after boot.

Performance and thermals where I'm at now are pretty good though. Peak temps have been around 66C. Single threaded tests in SuperPi and Cinebench had vcore all the way up to 1.537 during single core benchmarks, but temps averaged in the 50s. Will play with the memory timings a bit to see if I can get the clock a bit higher.
 

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- The difference between LVL3 & 4 is the "Precision Boost Override Scalar", which for LVL3 is 1x and 10x for LVL4. Increasing the scalar value will relax the voltage limiting rules of FIT monitoring.
- Yes, Windows Balanced. The key here is to provide sufficiently low "minimum processor state" value to allow the boost to activate (25% of the cores have to reside in C6 for the ST boost to kick in fully). The Ryzen Balanced profile for 1000-series Ryzens won't work as its minimum is 90%.
- The CPU is always in control of the voltage, unless "OC-Mode" is activated (ratio set manually to higher than base ratio) or the voltage is set to "manual mode" (i.e. override from the controller side).
- The voltage curve on Zen CPUs is extremely steep at high frequencies and Pinnacle Ridge is not an exception. Based on "FIT" testing I made, up to ~1.42V (single core workloads) provides 100% silicon reliability, while up to ~1.48V provides slightly reduced reliability (similar to FIT rules set to 10x). These are actual voltages mind you ("CPU Core Voltage SVI2 TFN" in HWInfo).
hi stilt, would you recommand pe4 over pe3 for 24/7 ?
 

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By reliability do you mean voltages that won’t degrade the silicon? Find it unusual seeing as everything on default voltages can spike to 1.5


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Yes.

The requests can be extremely high, however the CPU will monitor the actual effective voltage.
Try adjusting the load-line and you should see the request to decrease.
 

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hi stilt, would you recommand pe4 over pe3 for 24/7 ?
Even with PE4 the voltage will remain in the constrains AMD is willing to allow these parts to run at (through overclocking).

Both PE3 & PE4 involve overclocking, so use whatever works best for you.

There is plenty of silicon variance with Pinnacle Ridge, so you need to test out and see which works the best.
 

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Even with PE4 the voltage will remain in the constrains AMD is willing to allow these parts to run at (through overclocking).



Both PE3 & PE4 involve overclocking, so use whatever works best for you.



There is plenty of silicon variance with Pinnacle Ridge, so you need to test out and see which works the best.


So even under PE3-4 it stays within amd voltage limits? What’s the best way to reduce voltage spikes LLC and offset? PE 3 takes me up too 1.55+


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Even with PE4 the voltage will remain in the constrains AMD is willing to allow these parts to run at (through overclocking).

Both PE3 & PE4 involve overclocking, so use whatever works best for you.

There is plenty of silicon variance with Pinnacle Ridge, so you need to test out and see which works the best.
some users report the pe4 would boost the voltage to >1.55v which is siad to be unsafe for the long run.
i just want to maximize the single core performance for gaming purpose, but i found that when single core is boosted to 4.4g~4.5g, the rest were just <3ghz....any suggestion to raise those rest cores frequecenies while having highest single core frequencies at the same time??

thanks i will try pe4 tmr:D
 

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I’m having some issues with getting my RAM to run at any respectable speed on this motherboard. The kit I’m using is F4-3600C15D-16GTZ (3600mhz C15 Samsung B-die) but nothing above 2133mhz is stable. I’ve tried the D.O.C.P (spelling? In class currently) settings but the machine wont post with them. On BIOS 0601 I can’t even post with 3000mhz C16. On 05XX (cant remember #) I can post at C16 3000mhz but Windows10 immediately blue screens. I’ve tried various settings but none seem to be stable except 2133 with something like C15 timings. I’ve tried the built in profiles (The Stilts and the rest) but cant seem to make any progress. What am I doing wrong? Is there a guide I can be pointed to?

Edit: forgot to mention I have a 2700x.
 

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some users report the pe4 would boost the voltage to >1.55v which is siad to be unsafe for the long run.
i just want to maximize the single core performance for gaming purpose, but i found that when single core is boosted to 4.4g~4.5g, the rest were just <3ghz....any suggestion to raise those rest cores frequecenies while having highest single core frequencies at the same time??

thanks i will try pe4 tmr:D
This is what I wrote few days ago:

The maximum safe voltages for CPUs are an eternal riddle, as neither of the two manufacturers release this information for public consumption. Public or even the NDA documents generally specify a vague limit, which most of the time relates to a point where the catastrophic failures become more common instead of specifying the voltage that is safe to sustain without causing any damage to the silicon. Such limit is admittingly rather hard to specify, as the limit will vary between the different CPU specimens (silicon variance, SIDD) and operating scenarios (peak current in different utilization scenarios, temperature, etc.).

In order to get the most accurate answer for this question I ended up “asking” the CPU itself. As stated previously, the CPU features various different limiters / safe guards (Package Power Tracking: PPT, Thermal Design Current: TDC, Electrical Design Current: EDC, thermal protection and FIT).

“FIT” as the name suggest is a feature to monitor / track the fitness of the silicon and adjust the operating parameters to maintain the specified and expected reliability. Many semiconductor manufacturers utilize such feature to eke out every last bit of performance, in an ERA where most of the semiconductors are process bound in terms of performance. In short: FIT feature allows the manufacturers to push their designs to the very limit out of the box, without jeopardizing the reliability of the silicon. A practical example would be the knock sensors on an engine. The control unit of the engine always tries to advance the ignition timing as much as possible, to produce the best possible power / torque figures. The purpose of the knock sensors is to listen if knocking occurs and tell the ECU to reduce the timing advance when it does, in order to protect the engine.

To see what the actual maximum voltage FIT allows the CPU to run at in various different scenarios is, I disabled all of the other limiters and safe guards. With every other limiter / safe guard disabled, the reliability (FIT) becomes the only restrain. The voltage command which the CPU sends to the VRM regulator via the SVI2 interface and the actual effective voltage were then recorded in various scenarios. In stock configuration the sustained maximum effective voltage during all-core stress allowed by FIT was =< 1.330V. Meanwhile, in single core workloads the sustained maximum was =< 1.425V. When the “FIT” parameters were adjusted by increasing the scalar value from the default 1x to the maximum allowed value of 10x, the maximum all-core voltage became 1.380V, while the maximum single core voltage increased to 1.480V. The recorded figures appear to fall very well in line with the seen and known behavior, frequency, power and thermal scaling wise.

The seen behavior suggests that the full silicon reliability can be maintained up to around 1.330V in all-core workloads (i.e. high current) and up to 1.425V in single core workloads (i.e. low current). Use of higher voltages is definitely possible (as FIT will allow up to 1.380V / 1.480V when scalar is increased by 10x), but it more than likely results in reduced silicon lifetime / reliability. By how much? Only the good folks at AMD who have access to the simulation data will know for sure.

These figures will almost certainly vary between the different CPU specimens (due to SIDD and other silicon specific factors), however the recorded values were almost identical on all of the tested samples (within 20mV, lowest-highest leaking specimen).

Also note that the figures stated here relate to the actual effective voltage, and not to the voltage requested by the CPU. The CPU is aware of the actual effective voltage, so things like load-line adjustments and voltage offsets will modify the CPUs voltage request from the VRM controller accordingly. The most accurate method to measure the effective voltage on AM4 platform is to monitor the “VDDCR_CPU SVI2 TFN” voltage, which is available in HWInfo. This reading is sourced directly from the VRM controller (through SVI2 interface) and generally it is the most accurate reading available to end-users by far. As a side note, while the TFN (“telemetry function”) voltage readings are always generic (and accurate), never blindly trust the reported current and power readings (as every motherboard model needs separate calibration).
The voltage requests you are seeing are irrelevant, only the actual voltage matters.
Look at the TFN voltage figure and nothing else.

The voltage will vary depending on several things. In single threaded workloads it varies heavily based on the core the workload is being scheduled on.

Here's some figures with PE3:

ST workload scheduled on the best core of the CPU (Core 2):


Peak voltage 1.451V, while the average being 1.372V.

ST workload scheduled on the worst core of the CPU (Core 7):


Peak voltage 1.503V, while the average being 1.472V.

All-core workload:


Peak voltage 1.297V, while the average being 1.259V.

VDDCR_CPU is the same reading as "CPU Core Voltage SVI2 TFN" under HWInfo, while the "command" value is what the CPU is requesting.

Since the CPU remains in control of the voltage at all times, the actual voltage will depend on the core the workload gets utilized and on the CPU specimen itself.
If you are seeing constantly over 1.5V SVI2 TFN voltages with PE4 enabled, in single threaded workloads then I suggest that you don't use PE4 on your CPU.
 
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