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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a Ryzen 3600 in 2019. I bought this processor because I knew it had game boost up to 4.2GHz. But I was shocked when I saw the voltage and temperatures at this acceleration (1.45V and 102C with a 125W tower cooler).



I started looking for information about this and found out that such a voltage is fatal for the Ryzen 3600. Everyone recommends a voltage below 1.3V. EVERYONE I have seen has a processor running at 4.2GHz at voltages below 1.3V or around 1.31V

But my Ryzen 3600 doesn't run at this low voltage. At 1.3V, my Ryzen 3600 starts up below 3.4GHz.
How do I get my Ryzen 3600 to run at 4.2GHz without harming it? The minimum voltage with which my Ryzen 3600 operates at 4.2GHz = 1.37V (which, according to 146% of experts, is fatal to the processor). I agree with them, since the temperature of 84C is dangerous given the fact that the ventilators (there are 3 of them on the case) operate at maximum speed.



What should I do? Maybe for Ryzen 3600 (rev. 2019) high voltage is normal?

Can the BIOS on the motherboard be configured incorrectly?



My PC:

Motherboard: MSI Tomahawk Max B450 (MS-7C02) bios - 3.7.

RAM: 2x Ballistix Sport LT Gray (XMP 3000MHz) (8 Gb D-die (Z01B / 20 nm) / 1 die)



Current BIOS settings

CPU Frequency - Auto (3600MHz)

CPU Voltage - Auto (1.36V) with a TPD load of more than 65W which does not correspond to the stated TPD from AMD

Global C-state Control - Disabled
AMD Cool-n-Quiet - Disabled
Precision Boost Overdrive - Disabled



Thank you so much in advance for your help!!!
 

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Voltage goes hand in hand with current in order to determine what's "safe".

For Ryzen 3000, the basic theory is this: (will happen automatically at stock settings)

Low current (10, 20, 30, 40A) => High voltage (up to 1.5V or even more) = browsing the web, firing up a Steam game, etc. = NOT DANGEROUS! TOTALLY FINE!

High current (60, 70, 80, 100A) => Low voltage (up to ~1.3V) - different for each sample and controlled by the FIT module inside the CPU = Cinebench, Blender, Prime95, etc.


In order to determine the max "safe" load voltage, you have to:

-enable PBO with manual limits(140W,140A,140A should be fine for your 3600; don't change scalar or boost frequency settings)

-run Prime95 custom 128K -> 128K in-place for a few minutes.

You'll see some Vdroop, that means the load voltage will go down according to the increase in current and in temperature. That lowest voltage point you see in HWInfo64 during Prime95 is your max "safe" load voltage and you should dial in your overclock with the proper LLC setting so that the voltage will always reach that value whenever you fire up Prime95 as written above. You can do the same with Cinebench R20: PBO settings, do a CB R20 run and check the voltage to see the lowest point => adjust your OC so that you always hit that voltage in CB R20.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
-enable PBO with manual limits(140W,140A,140A should be fine for your 3600; don't change scalar or boost frequency settings
I'm a little confused. Do I have to set the standard CPU voltage and frequency settings before the test?

The screenshot shows the voltage with the current (my) BIOS settings.
 

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I'm a little confused. Do I have to set the standard CPU voltage and frequency settings before the test?

The screenshot shows the voltage with the current (my) BIOS settings.
You have to just enable PBO with manual limits: 140, 140, 140. That's all. Don't change CPU frequency or voltage.
 

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