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Discussion Starter #1
Current Rig:

Ryzen 3900XT
Asus x570 TUF Gaming Plus (Wifi)
32gigs DDR4 4000mhz Ram
RTX 2070 Super
Noctua NH-U12A
Gigabyte m2 ssd 1 terabyte
Windows 10 x64 Pro (2004 build)
BIOS 2607

Set ram to 3600 and the fclk to 1800. Disabled PBO in the BIOS.

Ran cinebench and noticed my boost only going to 3.9ghz and when playing CoD boost was going to 4.2ghz. Nowhere did I see any cores go to 4.4-4.7ghz. Is there some setting that helps the boost go higher? Temps while running cinebench was at 73 degrees.
 

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The 4.7 boost is only achievable in very light tasks.
 

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The less are you temps the more it will boost. Higher boosts will be achieved only in light loads. With better cooling you can get around 4-4.1ghz in cb15/20. Try a slight negative offset of around -0.04xx and check your clocks again while running cinebench.

In gaming 4.2-4.3 it's usually what I get.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm kind of confused (new to the amd scene and its been a long time since new pc) with performance and manually overclocking vs stock. I keep reading from various videos, or threads about losing single thread performance if you manually overclock, but if my main purpose is gaming then shouldn't my focus be on all cores since most games now run on more than just one core? I checked and while playing CoD Warzone all the cores ramped up to 4215 and the temperature never got higher than 76 degrees.

My question is, if I turned PBO off and manually set the cores to 4.4ghz and set the vcore (lets just say 1.36 for now) wouldn't that be a gain in performance since im not looking for single thread performance anyways?
 

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I'm kind of confused (new to the amd scene and its been a long time since new pc) with performance and manually overclocking vs stock. I keep reading from various videos, or threads about losing single thread performance if you manually overclock, but if my main purpose is gaming then shouldn't my focus be on all cores since most games now run on more than just one core? I checked and while playing CoD Warzone all the cores ramped up to 4215 and the temperature never got higher than 76 degrees.

My question is, if I turned PBO off and manually set the cores to 4.4ghz and set the vcore (lets just say 1.36 for now) wouldn't that be a gain in performance since im not looking for single thread performance anyways?
you can try by yourself and tell us. I've also tried fixed clock/voltage and had weird stutters in warzone from time to time, back to full auto no stuttering any more. I'd leave pbo off anyway. 1.36V is way too high to be used.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
you can try by yourself and tell us. I've also tried fixed clock/voltage and had weird stutters in warzone from time to time, back to full auto no stuttering any more. I'd leave pbo off anyway. 1.36V is way too high to be used.
I'm just learning it all slowly all while tinkering here and there to understand it more. With PBO on and all max settings when I ran cinebench r20 was checking the voltages and it was anywhere from 1.344 to 1.364 and max temp it ever hit was 81 degrees with an average score of 7300. When I turned PBO off and ran cinebench r20 and checked the voltages it was around 1.233 to about 1.28ish and the max temp it ever hit was 73 degrees with the score dropping to about 7100ish.

I don't know enough from experience but with PBO on, but it hardly made any difference in performance while gaming (all I care about) but the temp drop was pretty big going from 76 to about 61 while gaming. I just need to tinker with manual overclocking myself since with PBO off and playing CoD the cores didn't hit anywhere near 4.3ghz, highest was 4.1ghz. If I can get all cores to go at 4.3ghz while staying under 75ish I will be happy. I suppose its going to come down to what my cpu wants in terms of the vcore.

Any suggestions or tips is highly appreciated!
 

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@SouthpawJoe definitely play around w/ a manual OC. The advertised 4.7 boost is almost misleading, yes, you can hit 4.7, and the CPU will from time to time under PBO, but virtually every application and game these days is multi-threaded enough to where you will never hit 4.7 w/ any sort of consistency. My manual OCs are 4.5/4.4 @ 1.32 when gaming and 4.3/4.2 @ 1.22 for everyday use w/ [email protected] running 24/7 when not gaming.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@SouthpawJoe definitely play around w/ a manual OC. The advertised 4.7 boost is almost misleading, yes, you can hit 4.7, and the CPU will from time to time under PBO, but virtually every application and game these days is multi-threaded enough to where you will never hit 4.7 w/ any sort of consistency. My manual OCs are 4.5/4.4 @ 1.32 when gaming and 4.3/4.2 @ 1.22 for everyday use w/ [email protected] running 24/7 when not gaming.
Oh nice. My first thing im going to aim for is just 4.3ghz all core. So you also have a 3900xt, if so which motherboard do you have? So dang, you run 4.3ghz on all core with the vcore set to 1.22?
 

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The XT series is a little better, but all 3k series chips have some core variation. Using my 3700 as an example (older chip, first or second production run), I have 2 cores which can hit, and even occasionally surpass the 4.4Ghz "boost" rating of this chip with relatively low voltage. I also have 2 cores which can't even handle 4.2Ghz at stock voltage. Setting a manual all-core OC is a process of balancing core speed and voltage to get the highest possible clock speed at the lowest possible voltage for every core. This means that in almost every case, your manual OC will be lower than what your one or two best cores can handle, which will make it worse at single/lightly threaded performance than regular PBO.

I see a manual OC like this:

Pros
noticeably better benchmark scores
closer to the performance I expected
not difficult to achieve

Cons
higher power requirements
worse performance in single/lightly threaded apps
generates a lot more heat
no obvious improvement in gaming or office tasks (primary use for this rig)

If your computer is primarily used for rendering or other serious multithreaded number crunching, a manual OC will probably be better than PBO. If it is primarily for gaming or office type tasks, PBO will have the advantage. You can also have it both ways. Enable the manual OC when needed for a specific task, and then switch back to PBO for regular use - that's what I do.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The XT series is a little better, but all 3k series chips have some core variation. Using my 3700 as an example (older chip, first or second production run), I have 2 cores which can hit, and even occasionally surpass the 4.4Ghz "boost" rating of this chip with relatively low voltage. I also have 2 cores which can't even handle 4.2Ghz at stock voltage. Setting a manual all-core OC is a process of balancing core speed and voltage to get the highest possible clock speed at the lowest possible voltage for every core. This means that in almost every case, your manual OC will be lower than what your one or two best cores can handle, which will make it worse at single/lightly threaded performance than regular PBO.

I see a manual OC like this:

Pros
noticeably better benchmark scores
closer to the performance I expected
not difficult to achieve

Cons
higher power requirements
worse performance in single/lightly threaded apps
generates a lot more heat
no obvious improvement in gaming or office tasks (primary use for this rig)

If your computer is primarily used for rendering or other serious multithreaded number crunching, a manual OC will probably be better than PBO. If it is primarily for gaming or office type tasks, PBO will have the advantage. You can also have it both ways. Enable the manual OC when needed for a specific task, and then switch back to PBO for regular use - that's what I do.
Ah good info, thank you for that.
 

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If your keen for OC the 3900xt, best thing you can do is find your FIT voltage.

Make sure you are using Hwinfo64 and download and run prime 95.

After about 5 minutes you can check CPU core voltage (SVI TFN). That will be a SAFE voltage for everyday all core OC.

There is a few detailed videos on how to do this and i think buildzoid does a good one on overclocking a 3600? and takes it through step by step.


EDIT: People have said that even at 1.3v they have seen degradation on ryzen 3000 cpus, but this is the internet so take it with a grain of salt. It might be true but it might also have been an outlier.
 

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Oh nice. My first thing im going to aim for is just 4.3ghz all core. So you also have a 3900xt, if so which motherboard do you have? So dang, you run 4.3ghz on all core with the vcore set to 1.22?
MSI X570 Unify. 4.3 on one CCD, 4.2 on the other weaker CCD @ 1.2375 which is 1.22 after LLC. The weaker CCD requires 1.24 volts to stabilize at 4.3 which is a bit too close to my comfort zone of 1.25 for 24/7 max load w/ [email protected] which can run avx. 1.24 also nears my personal comfort zone of 80c, where 1.22 keeps the CPU ~77 max load which allows for temperature fluctuations throughout the day. From what I have seen in our 3900x oc thread (which you should check out) my 3900XT is pretty average, so there is a fair chance you might see even better results on your sample!
 

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I'm just learning it all slowly all while tinkering here and there to understand it more. With PBO on and all max settings when I ran cinebench r20 was checking the voltages and it was anywhere from 1.344 to 1.364 and max temp it ever hit was 81 degrees with an average score of 7300. When I turned PBO off and ran cinebench r20 and checked the voltages it was around 1.233 to about 1.28ish and the max temp it ever hit was 73 degrees with the score dropping to about 7100ish.

I don't know enough from experience but with PBO on, but it hardly made any difference in performance while gaming (all I care about) but the temp drop was pretty big going from 76 to about 61 while gaming. I just need to tinker with manual overclocking myself since with PBO off and playing CoD the cores didn't hit anywhere near 4.3ghz, highest was 4.1ghz. If I can get all cores to go at 4.3ghz while staying under 75ish I will be happy. I suppose its going to come down to what my cpu wants in terms of the vcore.

Any suggestions or tips is highly appreciated!
Well, I'm not the guy to recommend you settings for static clock cause I have not tested much. All I know from the short time I've tested, is that I can do 4300 with 1.2V fully stable. But as my cpu boosts as it should, I was losing too much single core performance. CCX overclock it's a interesting thing, yields even more performance than all core oc and 1usmus is coming up with a tool for some extra free performance by the end of this month. PBO here does not do any good, I score around 7270 when is chill outside and less when is too hot and the loop is already pretty warm. If I enable PBO it will affect negatively the thermals and the scores will go down.
While playing cod, pbo off, cpu full auto the cores are around 4100-4350 and most of the time in between 4200-4300. Boost, single or multicore is very temperature dependant.

Try cod with cpu full auto, pbo off, and a negative offset of -.04xxx. Check if you get any better clocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
If your keen for OC the 3900xt, best thing you can do is find your FIT voltage.

Make sure you are using Hwinfo64 and download and run prime 95.

After about 5 minutes you can check CPU core voltage (SVI TFN). That will be a SAFE voltage for everyday all core OC.

There is a few detailed videos on how to do this and i think buildzoid does a good one on overclocking a 3600? and takes it through step by step.


EDIT: People have said that even at 1.3v they have seen degradation on ryzen 3000 cpus, but this is the internet so take it with a grain of salt. It might be true but it might also have been an outlier.
So I did that, although wasn't sure what exact test on prime95 so I just installed it and ran whatever popped up lol. And this is a screenshot from running it for 5 mins or so:

2459058
 

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So I did that, although wasn't sure what exact test on prime95 so I just installed it and ran whatever popped up lol. And this is a screenshot from running it for 5 mins or so:
You need to run the small FFTs stress test. This looks like blend or something.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
That is default with everything on auto (except for ram stuff of course).

Edit: I noticed you have a 3800XT, this is for a 3900XT. Just had to make sure you knew that (sorry if you did hehe).
 
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