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The Samsung because it costs less. At the end of the day, they're the same except for the price. You could buy both and have some friend swap these out on you at random times each week without telling you, and you'd never notice a difference in performance. NVMe SSDs are far above realistic real-world usage scenarios unless what you do relies entirely on drive performance. So if the most demanding thing you'll be doing is gaming, then get the one that costs less money.

Or you could put two 1TB Inland Premium NVMe SSDs together (from Micro Center). Inland Premium 1TB SSD 3D NAND M.2 2280 PCIe NVMe 3.0 x4 Internal Solid State Drive, Read/Write Speed up to 3100 MBps and - Micro Center

They're $114.99 each, so that's about $230 before tax.

They use the Phison E12 controller.
 
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I was thinking Samsung as well since I have two SSDs from them now and they work great. The Sabrent is temping because you get Acronis for free with it ($60 value).
Well, you could get the Sabrent and you could see the inclusion of Acronis as being free, but if you put two 1TB Inland Premium NVMe SSDs together, that's $230 before tax leaving you with about $100 to spend on whatever you want compared to the cost of the Sabrent SSD after tax. So, you could buy Acronis for $60 and still be ahead by $40 vs. where you'd be if you bought the Sabrent SSD.

It doesn't have to be the 1TB Inland Premium SSD either. It could be anything that has a much lower price. You live in Brooklyn NY and there's a Micro Center in Brooklyn so that's why I'm mentioning the Inland Premium SSD.

2TB SSDs are being sold at a very premium price right now while 1TB SSDs are at much more reasonable prices.
 

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Well, you could get the Sabrent and you could see the inclusion of Acronis as being free, but if you put two 1TB Inland Premium NVMe SSDs together, that's $230 before tax leaving you with about $100 to spend on whatever you want compared to the cost of the Sabrent SSD after tax. So, you could buy Acronis for $60 and still be ahead by $40 vs. where you'd be if you bought the Sabrent SSD.

It doesn't have to be the 1TB Inland Premium SSD either. It could be anything that has a much lower price. You live in Brooklyn NY and there's a Micro Center in Brooklyn so that's why I'm mentioning the Inland Premium SSD.

2TB SSDs are being sold at a very premium price right now while 1TB SSDs are at much more reasonable prices.
Hmmm.... I suppose I could run them in Raid 0 as well..something to think about for sure. Thank you!
 

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Hmmm.... I suppose I could run them in Raid 0 as well..something to think about for sure. Thank you!
You're welcome. I'll definitely understand though if in the end you get a 2TB SSD. I think that's what I'd rather do if I had the money for it.

Another thing you could do though with two drives like that is what I do: one for Windows and all of your apps, and the other for your games and other things you wouldn't want to lose whenever you format and start over. Granted, those kinds of things can be copied to a safe place first, but I used to do that and I grew tired of it and bought a secondary drive. That was over 20 years ago now. I've had a 2-drive system ever since. I got it down now where I can format and start over and all I have to copy to a safe place first are a few small things from some Application Data folders.
 
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I bought a 2TB 980 Pro last week for $349. It was available at Samsung.com, B&H, and BB for that price. It looks like it went back up to $400, so if it drops to $349 again you might as well get it.
 

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If you were prepared to spend ~$300 on a 2TB drive, you could also get the 1TB Inland Premium (or any reference Phison E12 drive) for the OS and primary apps, and then a ~$200 2TB DRAM-less TLC NVMe drive for games / media.



Also found this fast $200 QLC drive :

 
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If you were prepared to spend ~$300 on a 2TB drive, you could also get the 1TB Inland Premium (or any reference Phison E12 drive) for the OS and primary apps, and then a ~$200 2TB DRAM-less TLC NVMe drive for games / media.



Also found this fast $200 QLC drive :

This too. I picked up a 1TB Inland Premium as a 2nd NVME for my laptop. It is Microcenter's in-house brand. Other who know more than me (@shilka) had nothing but good things to say about the Phison E12.
 

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I picked up a rocket Q 2tb for $200, I think the difference vs the new pci-e 4.0 version will likely be very hard to actually notice
 

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I picked u
p a rocket Q 2tb for $200, I think the difference vs the new pci-e 4.0 version will likely be very hard to actually notice
You will notice a difference with the slower QLC rocket Q vs a TLC nvme drive though,
 
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I have bought something like five Sabrent drives over the past three years. They're all amazing. Small sample size, but I've had no issues with any of them yet.
 

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What does this mean? I'm a bit new to M.2's. I thought they were all smoking fast?
Mlc > tlc > qlc performance wise. Mlc is two bits per cell , tlc three, qlc four. The larger the bit depth the slower the performance and lifetime. Qlc is pretty slow unless it has lots of faster nand or ram for a buffer - generally not so much of this as it drives the cost up.

The other drives mentioned in this thread are tlc.
 
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I'd be impressed if someone can tell the difference between QLC, TLC and MLC NVMe SSDs. Here are the specifications for the 2TB Sabrent Rocket Q:
  • Max Sequential Read: up to 3200 MB/sec
  • Max Sequential Write: up to 2900 MB/sec
  • 4KB Random Read: up to 670,000 IOPS
  • 4KB Random Write: up to 255,000 IOPS
I don't know of anything in a gaming system that can take advantage of these speeds yet, and this is supposed to be one of the slower NVMe SSDs, at least according to the specs.

I upgraded my Windows drive from a 250GB Samsung 840 EVO 2.5" SATA SSD to the 1TB Inland Premium NVMe SSD and it's not any faster, at least not that I can tell. Not even my games launch faster (yes, I moved my games to this drive temporarily for testing - I had to know). They might be launching a couple of seconds faster, but I'm not sure. The 1TB Inland Premium NVMe SSD's specifications are as follows:
  • Max Sequential Read: up to 3100 MB/sec
  • Max Sequential Write: up to 2800 MB/sec
  • 4KB Random Read: up to 520,000 IOPS
  • 4KB Random Write: up to 430,000 IOPS
The 250GB Samsung 840 EVO's specifications are:
  • Max Sequential Read: up to 540 MB/sec
  • Max Sequential Write: up to 520 MB/sec
  • 4KB Random Read: up to 97,000 IOPS
  • 4KB Random Write: up to 66,000 IOPS

Now you would think I'd be seeing a huge difference since the 1TB Inland Premium NVMe SSD is over 5x faster than the 250GB Samsung 840 EVO. However, again, I'm not seeing or feeling any differences to my drive performance at all. Or, I don't know, maybe I am! It's certainly not enough to make me go "omg wow" though. Windows isn't starting faster or shutting down faster, things aren't loading faster, nothing's different. I'm not disappointed though because I know a time will come when Windows and games and apps will be designed to take advantage of these ultra-fast drives.

So yeah, you could get a 2.5" SATA SSD and still get amazing drive performance, especially if your system is just for gaming (at most). There's entirely too much hype and even hyperbole over NVMe SSDs and the worst of it is that it all seems to be aimed at gamers.

Y'know what? In my experience, a 2.5" SATA SSD is easier to install and more of a pleasure because you just mount it and plug it in. Boom. Done. With an NVMe SSD, you have remove your video card, remove the motherboard's M.2 SSD heatsink which has very tiny screws, insert your NVMe SSD into the slot, then you have to screw it down with an extremely tiny screw (I thought I'd have to get out my smallest screwdriver by the looks of it but fortunately the head is designed for normal screwdrivers). Let's not forget the fun part: the greasy grubby thermal pads on the motherboard's M.2 SSD heatsink which gets on your fingers and gets on everything you touch. Oh and then what about that day when you want to replace the NVMe SSD with a new one? Good lord. First, you have to remove your video card, then you have to remove the M.2 SSD heatsink, then you have to unscrew the NVMe SSD, then you have to put it somewhere (and I'm sure it's got the greasy thermal pad compound on it), then you'll probably want to wash your hands, and then you'll install the new one... and then wash your hands. Ugh. I'm not looking forward to the day when I replace my 1TB NVMe SSD, but hey... I had to see for myself if it would be any faster, and ultimately it's not. The most demanding thing I use my system for is games.

Anyway... :)

Edit: In light of what shilka said below, I rescind everything I said regarding the comparison of a QLC NVMe SSD to any TLC or MLC version. This is also an opportunity for me to say that my position is that I feel a good SATA SSD should be just as fast for real-world performance in a gaming system compared to any good NVMe SSD. So I'm also clarifying here that it doesn't have to be a 2.5" SATA SSD since there are M.2 SATA SSDs that have the same specifications (for the most part) as their 2.5" SATA counterparts.
 

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QLC NAND flash can in some use cases be as slow as a HDD and its less durable since its life time writes is lot lower which is why QLC drives are so cheap
If the choice is between TLC and QLC NAND or a good hard drive i would rather take the hard drive
 
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Depends on end user use, really. My drives will never see much use. Nothing even remotely touching their lifetime writes. But thats just me. As with anything, you get what's appropriate for you.
 

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Edit: In light of what shilka said below, I rescind everything I said regarding the comparison of a QLC NVMe SSD to any TLC or MLC version.
Then why don't you delete it .
 
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