Overclock.net banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Context: 2 1TB HDDs, 1 new 2TB SSD.

Just purchased a 2TB SSD to once and for all get rid of my noisy HDDs. I have about 800GB of data on HDD 1 and 600GB data on HDD 2. I split the SSD into 2 equal 1TB partitions.

What is the best way to transfer the files from HDDs to SSD without wearing down the SSD too much? Is there a less strenuous way to migrate the data besides drag and dropping from HDD to SSD?

I know about clone utilities but I'm not sure if they are any better than just dragging and dropping the data.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
Your SSD manufacturer probably offers a cloning utility that will offer you several options for cloning the drives. Check the paperwork that came with your SSD for web links. I would not worry about wearing down a brand new SSD doing your setup, they are more long lived than the early models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Your SSD manufacturer probably offers a cloning utility that will offer you several options for cloning the drives. Check the paperwork that came with your SSD for web links. I would not worry about wearing down a brand new SSD doing your setup, they are more long lived than the early models.
It's a Micron 1100 2TB, not exactly newest and latest.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
It's a Micron 1100 2TB, not exactly newest and latest.
It's new enough.

As @essanbee said, you can opt to clone your drives. Cloning should also be much faster than simple file copy as that's just large sequential write instead of writing thousands of small files.

Given that's an OEM drive though, probably no software provided. I like and use Macrium Reflect.
 

·
Overclocking Enthusiast
Joined
·
6,037 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,494 Posts
Don't worry about wear with only 2TB worth of transfers, you'll be just fine. I personally would robocopy it to keep the timestamps, or drag and drop because this is your chance to rebuild your file structure from scratch. Either way, if you clone, or file copy the data, it's still the same amount of blocks read and written (for the most part). According to the spec, it should withstand at least 400TB written over the course of its life.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top