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Aren't this fancy!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Taking apart a ThermalTake 140mm fan, step by step with pics, where I oiled and how I cleaned it. Other fans may be different.

This fan was gunked up with dust and I think the oil had been absorbed by the dust. I have taken it apart 2 times so far. It went about a week from the first oiling, so the 2nd time I oiled it more liberally, and we will see how long it makes it this time.

ThermalTake TT1425 Fan


Tools used, Sewing Machine oil*, 2 picks, (small flat head screwdriver not pictured)

*Note* I used sewing machine oil which is a very light oil the first time I did this, about a week later the fan started wobbling and was no longer lubricated apparently. This may be caused by either: using to light of an oil, by not applying enough oil, Or the fan may be irreparable and the application of oil does not matter.

Side with Sticker, Remove this sticker to get access to Seal


Remove the rubber seal on the back to get access to the C-clip


What it looks like with rubber seal removed. The pics are pretty bad, but what you can see here is on top a C clip holding the fan shaft on.


I used the 2 picks to get the C clip off, and then took out the rubber grommet, and 3 washers.
IMPORTANT: While removing the C clip it may shoot across the room. ALSO be sure to remember which order the grommet and washers are installed.


What it looks like inside with washers and grommet and fan blade removed
The first time I took this apart, the inside was sticky. I used some cue tips with alcohol (higher % better) to clean out the inside. I had to take off most of the cotton for it to fit in the shaft, but it cleaned it nicely.


Motor shown here, with fan blade removed. You will want to oil the top, around the hole, and inside the hole.


Fan blade shown here, might as well oil the shaft here too, and then insert back into the motor.


With the fan back inside the motor, oil the top of the shaft and around it.


Put the washers and grommet back in order and push down onto the shaft


Now you are ready to put the C clip back on. This is kind of difficult, really taking off the C clip and putting it back on are the hardest parts. What I did was use one pick and a small flat blade screw driver to push the clip down. It may even work better with 2 small flat blade screw drivers, as it takes quite a bit of pressure to get the little thing on there.

You can oil around the bottom of this as well when put back together. Put the rubber seal back on and the sticker on top of that(if you want). DONE.

Hope this helps some, not like this is very hard to just figure out, but OCN likes pics.

Dislaimer:
This guide is to be used at your own risk. I take no responsibility for the modifications made by you. Anything done to your property is done at your own risk. Fans may differ, results may vary.
 

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Nice guide there with nice pics, deserves a rep me thinks. This does actually help, if youve had a fan for a while and notice its gotten louder, do exactly what the OP has and it does help. Broke a blade on my san ace and i had to do the same.
 

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Aren't this fancy!
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by UnAimed
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Nice guide +1


Quote:


Originally Posted by waqasr
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Nice guide there with nice pics, deserves a rep me thinks. This does actually help, if youve had a fan for a while and notice its gotten louder, do exactly what the OP has and it does help. Broke a blade on my san ace and i had to do the same.

Thanks, speaking of broken blades, I used some pvc cement to attach a fan blade once
 

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At the pic
"Motor shown here, with fan blade removed. You will want to oil the top, around the hole, and inside the hole."

That looks like a sealed bearing, in fact wouldn't that be the only way?

Matches the same bearings that go to rollerblade wheels.

I only noticed that in the 1 pic, so i could be wrong here.
 

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Aren't this fancy!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Glad a few people are getting something out of it. Thanks all around. I think why this fan initially failed was because it was mounted horizontally in the top of a used case a bought. I read somewhere (scroll to bearing types.) that fans with sleeve bearings, as this one has, should be mounted vertically, so the oil doesn't burn out of them. Seems to be working fine now though.
 

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Man with Fans
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Sleeve bearing fans. They wear out quicker under high heat and non-vertical placings.
Placing the fan up-firing or down-firing, or in any other configuration other than front-firing drastically lowers the lifespan of a sleeve bearing fan.

Telltale signs are that they start to make miniature scraping noises and then move on to an all-out rattling when the oil dries up.
The life of sleeve bearing fans literally depends on the oil.
A few drops of mineral oil every 6 months should prolong the life of these fans.
 
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