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Ive been researching Sratch Built PC cases for a little bit now, and want to try and make one myself. I've never done any real case mods, so should I start there and work up to a sratch build? Or could enough research and prep make it possible?

Are there certain websites that would be helpful in teaching me what I need/What to look out for when building? My idea, right now, is that I have a CPU/GPU custom loop inside a Node 804, and while I like how small its footprint is, It is not really setup for maintenance, so I wanted to see if I could make a case, from either aluminium or acrylic, probably acrylic because I dont have any access to machining tools, that would be the same footprint, or smaller, or maybe just like a 1U/2U rackmount-style case, but still have good airflow and low noise.

Any help would be much appreciated
 

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Google Sketchup is a great tool . You make all your mistakes in the either where they don't cost any money.

I'm working in a "wall computer" for my workshop and there were many, many mistakes to get here. Right now the tubing runs are way to long.

 

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I've downloaded sketchup, I just haven't used it yet. Does it have tutorials on how to use it? Or do you just learn as you go?
 

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There's a lot of tutorials.
There's a lot of pre-drawn stuff in Skertchup Warehouse.

Start out drawing lines, boxes and cubes. Learn the "Push Tool", "Follow Me", "Scale", and "Dimensions".
Enable "Measurements" and you can type in dimensions as you draw. It's a lot easier that way sometimes.
For fun look up how to draw spheres.
"Intersect Faces" is kind of important for cutting up stuff, holes and the like.

You may want to set up your tools like this.

 

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tip: Having some background in metal or woodworking helps a lot in judging materials, distances, angles, mountings, etc to be used

Also.. if you want display your stuff.. walls mounts are it..
if you want it to 'blend-in" then there are lots of "wood" desk/cabinet options
 

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I built my design out of cardboard first. It is a free material you can grab from just about anywhere. Doing it this way I quickly realized most of my numbers did not work and allowed me to adjust. I also drew mine out to scale once I had an acceptable design. A large book of drawing paper was only $10 at the craft store.Just adding some suggestions if you are not handy with sketchup as I am not.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

There's a lot of tutorials.

There's a lot of pre-drawn stuff in Skertchup Warehouse.

Start out drawing lines, boxes and cubes. Learn the "Push Tool", "Follow Me", "Scale", and "Dimensions".

Enable "Measurements" and you can type in dimensions as you draw. It's a lot easier that way sometimes.

For fun look up how to draw spheres.

"Intersect Faces" is kind of important for cutting up stuff, holes and the like.

You may want to set up your tools like this.

Thanks for the quick tips on Sketch-up. I keep wanting to get in to it for the massive store of community models, but I'm still stuck in my AutoCAD ways.
 
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