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My Seagate external 2TB is running at 50c celcious, is this a safe temp? Will running at this temp cause the drive to fail sooner than running at a lower temp? I have a WD 2TB in the same location and it's running 10c cooler, at around 40C.
 

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Hi, ventilation and the power draw and other factors all go into how hot those external drives run. 50c is perfectly fine but to answer your question about the longevity technically if your drive was running at 30 instead of 40 it could possibly last longer but it isn't going to be a major difference.

Not sure the exact model you have but it def looks like looks where the first objective of the case not cooling. But like I said I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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60c is the temp that is kind of bad to go over AFAIK. edit BUT it is probably even higher than that and the rated temp is probably higher than that. You can go into my computer and find out the exact drive model (the one inside the enclosure) and pull the specs on it and I am sure it will tell you.

If you are worried and there is a no restocking fee return policy on the drive I would recommend that you return it simply for your peace of mind. If it ever broke you would blame it on the temp that is a sure thing.

That said there is an article that explains failures on drives are highly reduced at temperatures well under 40c and the higher the temp the more likely it would fail. However we are talking a very small total fail rate.

http://searchengineland.com/google-issues-paper-on-hard-drive-failures-10546

"There is less correlation between drive temperature and failure rates than might have been expected"

"56% of failed drives did not raise any significant SMART flags"

Of course this was a while ago but that pretty much says if your drive is going to fail it is going to fail. The exception being very very highly used drives are more likely to fail. But pretty much any other situation is out of your control.

The other thing I kind of gathered from the article is one of two things and they completely contradict each other but...

If a drive is a bad drive from the get go it is more likely to fail quickly from high usage.

or

Drives have a break in period.

I think it is the first of the two but like I said the data doesn't prove one nor the other.

So if it was the first it would make sense to test the crap out of the drive with full writes but if the later is true this could be damaging to the drive.

Enjoy thinking through that one.

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Also I bought a few velociraptors that where returned to newegg so possibly defective. Newegg flat out said UNTESTED. It made the price a steal at the time. I did full write tests with seatools (I think) and one failed. The one that failed had no smart warning and checked out in windows as being fine but the computer would lock up often.
 
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