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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is a directory/folder on my secondary drive D that I cannot remove no matter what I try because attempting to remove it results in an Windows error message that states that the item I am trying to delete "is no longer located in that directory". It does not, however, say that the directory in use and provides me with 2 choice - Cancel or Try Again. It is a folder/directory for an extracted Mass Effect 3 High Resolution Mod .rar archive. The name of the folder/directory is "3. Master File Zona C - ME3 HighRes Structures, objects and machinery" . The folder/directory became problematic (not usable or remove-able) immediately after I successfully extracted a .rar archive with the same name into that folder/directory. I had to re-extract the same .rar archive into a different directory, which worked wonderfully and I could the move extracted files and remove the directory into which they were extracted.

When I try to delete it or rename it, it tells me that such a folder/directory does not exists. I tried using the latest Unlocker (1.9.2), GiveMePower, CCleaner (with CCEnhancer), and JV16 PowerTools 2014 to either forcibly delete the directory during boot or to clean out all the temp files & folders + clean the registry, but none of tools and methods I used worked. I also ran 'chkdsk D: /F', but no problems were detected and the issue was not resolved. The folder cannot be renamed due to the same error, but it can be moved pretty much anywhere, except for Recycling Bin. Finally, I used Indexing Options in Windows 8.1 Control Panel, and ran Index Rebuild for all drives from the Advanced Options screen/menu, which also did not work. How do I get rid of this kaka?

I need a solution that does NOT involve "Taking Ownership" or adjusting/changing/editing/adding user/administrator/system permissions, which has always resulted in big problems for me down the road. How the hell do I get rid of this booboo, considering that it doesn't even exist???
 

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You could copy all the other data on the drive to a backup drive and format your secondary drive to remove it? It's a pretty
thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif
solution but can probably guarantee removing such a file/directory..?

Have you tried deleting the directory/file from command prompt as administrator? Internet searching leads me to believe that you would use the "rd" aka "rmdir" command to remove the folder/directory. I'm not well versed in using command prompt myself but its a good place to start.

-Strat

P.S. Don't actually format anything until you've tried everything else!
thumb.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrStrat007 View Post

Failing "taking ownership" of the file, you could copy all the other data on the drive to a backup drive and format your secondary drive to remove it? It's a pretty
thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif
solution but can probably guarantee removing such a file/directory..?

Have you tried deleting the directory/file from command prompt as administrator?
How do you know its an owenship problem??? It says the item is no longer there... I also completely disabled UAC, which prevented me from using Windows 8.1 Store Apps, but even with UAC fully disabled, I cannot remove that directory. If I use "Take Ownership" on ANY file or folder, I will eventually have big permission issues down the road. It happened each and every time I used that function...

The solution you provided would not work as drive D is my my storage drive and it is much bigger than my other drives combined. I was thinking of Hiren's Boot CD...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonarchX View Post

How do you know its an owenship problem??? It says the item is no longer there... I also completely disabled UAC, which prevented me from using Windows 8.1 Store Apps, but even with UAC fully disabled, I cannot remove that directory. If I use "Take Ownership" on ANY file or folder, I will eventually have big permission issues down the road. It happened each and every time I used that function...

The solution you provided would not work as drive D is my my storage drive and it is much bigger than my other drives combined. I was thinking of Hiren's Boot CD...
Re-reading your post, I don't think its a permissions problem.

Referencing source 1 and source 2, try using the command prompt to delete the "3. Master File Zona C - ME3 HighRes Structures, objects and machinery" directory/folder. I believe the proper command sequence would be something like what follows:

Code:

Code:
del \\?\D:\path_to_file\filename
or:

Code:

Code:
rd /s "\\?\D:\filepath\foldername
Edit to add: if the file is buried in a list of subfolders with long names, it's possible all that's required is to rename the directory to something shorter, such as "delete", as suggested in the articles linked.

Edit 2: as always, ymmv and use at your own risk!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I disabled UAC completely, rebooted, launched CMD prompt as administrator, typed all the stuff in, which resulted in the command line that looked like this, before I pressed Enter:
C:\Users\Enthusiast>RD /S /Q D:\Game Files\Mass Effect 3\Mods\Delete This Crap\Delete This Crap\3. Master File Zona C - ME3 HighRes Structures, objects and machinery.

After I pressed Enter I got a few of these:
System cannot find the file specified
and a few of those too:
System cannot find the path specified

Also, I was wrong about something - the folder/directory CANNOT be moved anywhere at all, but the directories that contain that folder can be renamed (can't be copied either). The folder itself cannot be renamed.

EDIT:
To simplify directory path, I renamed all folders containing the crap folder to 1, so I typed this up
"C:\Users\Enthusiast>RD /S /Q D:\1\1\1\1\1\3. Master File Zona C - ME3 HighRes Structures, objects and machinery." without the " "
And I got this:
System cannot find the file specified

Why does it think its a file? The name of the directory has a period at the very end... - is that why?

EDIT 2:
I also tried the same command without the /Q
"C:\Users\Enthusiast>RD /S D:\1\1\1\1\1\3. Master File Zona C - ME3 HighRes Structures, objects and machinery." without the " "
This time it asked if I was sure and I press Y and Enter, but I got the same problem:
The system cannot find the file specified
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonarchX View Post

There is a directory/folder on my secondary drive D that I cannot remove no matter what I try because attempting to remove it results in an Windows error message that states that the item I am trying to delete "is no longer located in that directory".
{snip}
This can happen sometimes when a file or folder has an invalid Unicode character in its name, or when the name is too long. Let's try to delete the folder using its DOS name instead (which should be valid):
  1. Start cmd (Command Prompt) as Administrator.
  2. Look at the current directory (that's the path that appears to the left of the blinking cursor). If its drive letter is different than the drive the errant folder is located on, change it by typing the correct drive letter followed by a colon (i.e. D:), and then press [Enter].
  3. Using the cd command, change the current directory to the parent of the errant folder (i.e. cd D:\1\1\1\1\1).
    • You can copy and paste the address from Explorer's address bar (you'll have to right-click the Command Prompt window to paste).
    • You can also navigate one level at a time by passing each name to cd one at a time (i.e. cd Users, cd "My Username", cd Desktop for "C:\Users\My Username\Desktop"). Names with spaces will require quotes around them.
    • At any point you can type dir and press [Enter] to refresh yourself on the folder contents in the current directory.
  4. Once you have successfully changed the current directory to the parent of the errant folder, type "dir /x", and press [Enter]. You should see the errant folder's name among the list of results. Immediately to the left of its name, you should see an all uppercase, shortened version, like "3._MAS~1" (in the commands below, I will use this string; substitute the with the correct one you see).
  5. Execute the following two commands:

    Code:

    Code:
    del /f /s "3._MAS~1"
    rmdir /s "3._MAS~1"
 
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