Overclock.net banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a NH-D15, this thing is a beast... haven't overclocked in a while... kind of a noob again I guess. I added a fan at the very back of the case (not in this picture), not sure if I need it though?

Idle temps currently sitting around 28-31C @ stock with EIST on. Motherboard is an ASUS Sabertooth Z87

Edit: don't mind the mismatch of fans, plan to replace all fans with Noctua eventually :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
Why get an OC board, CPU and cooler if you weren't?

Doesn't matter if you're a noob or not, the haswell guide is simple enough. Plenty of tards OC their CPUs based on Darkwizzie's guides.


Similar line of reasoning:
Should I go to college? I have all the books and it's paid for but I've never been.


Learning is a good thing IMO, good to stretch the think muscle from time to time.


https://www.overclock.net/forum/5-intel-cpus/1411077-haswell-overclocking-guide-statistics.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
Because the chip isn't delidded. If you're at 1.2 you should be able to get 4.5 with a stock chip at 1.25ish.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,981 Posts
Thanks guys, managed to get 4.4GHz @ 1.190V, stable with idle temps @ 25-30C, 100% load temps at 55-60C

I tried for 4.6 but even at 1.3V I was getting BSOD. Don't feel comfortable going much higher than that.
Are those load temps you mention with normal programs (like games and such), or with a stress test program like prime95? If that temperature was with a stress test program, you have a lot of room left to overclock some more.

There's something else going on if that jump from 1.19V to 1.3V wasn't enough. I remember Haswell had other interesting voltages you could tweak besides the core voltage. Those other voltages were important to stabilize things. Maybe try to find several different guides to help understand what's going on.

About what you wondered with regards to the second fan: I have the older NH-D14. It doesn't really need two fans. Using just one fan in the middle is already working pretty well. If you have an empty intake spot somewhere in your case where you could use a fan, moving the fan over there could be better than using both fans on the cooler.
 

·
Not a linux lobbyist
Joined
·
2,402 Posts
Thanks guys, managed to get 4.4GHz @ 1.190V, stable with idle temps @ 25-30C, 100% load temps at 55-60C

I tried for 4.6 but even at 1.3V I was getting BSOD. Don't feel comfortable going much higher than that.
You are kind of in a sweet spot there. 4.4 running cool, quiet volts with little work put into it.

1.4v is safe for Haswell if you keep it below 90, but it will be hot and loud for ~5% more performance.

When I delidded my 4770k I was able to get it to run a couple hundred MHz faster. But that is extra work and risk for not a lot of gain. Sure I could bench it at 4.9 if I pushed the volts over 1.5, the fans to max and added a little extra cooling, but it isn't pleasant to use that way. And I had to check the liquid metal after heating it so bad.
But I replaced that one with a 5775c and moved the 4770k to a tiny mini itx slim pc where it runs an undervolted 3.9 and is still pleasantly fast. Bought a different 4770k to run all of my old stuff for my daughter before I decided on the 5775c and the daughter's 4770k isn't as fast as yours for the volts and is still decent. I have hers running 4.3 at 1.25v for quick stability.

Depends what you want to do with it. It is already tuned for easy enjoyment. Or you can totally max it out and have fun doing that. A quick and rough ram oc can help performance a bit too. But can be frustrating when you push it too far. Using XMP settings (if they are stable) is the easy way to get most of those benefits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Are those load temps you mention with normal programs (like games and such), or with a stress test program like prime95? If that temperature was with a stress test program, you have a lot of room left to overclock some more.

There's something else going on if that jump from 1.19V to 1.3V wasn't enough. I remember Haswell had other interesting voltages you could tweak besides the core voltage. Those other voltages were important to stabilize things. Maybe try to find several different guides to help understand what's going on.

About what you wondered with regards to the second fan: I have the older NH-D14. It doesn't really need two fans. Using just one fan in the middle is already working pretty well. If you have an empty intake spot somewhere in your case where you could use a fan, moving the fan over there could be better than using both fans on the cooler.
Load temps are with AIDA64 just stressing the CPU. If I also stress FPU temps are in the high 70s, spiking into the high 80s. I moved some fans around, removed a fan from the top, centered the other 140mm fan above the CPU cooler. The 2 fan setup on the NH-D15 was causing some sort of humming noise (fans working against each other I assume)
Going to buy 2 more Noctua fans to match the rest, as the case fans I have now don't really move much air.
Check out the pic :)
You are kind of in a sweet spot there. 4.4 running cool, quiet volts with little work put into it.

1.4v is safe for Haswell if you keep it below 90, but it will be hot and loud for ~5% more performance.

When I delidded my 4770k I was able to get it to run a couple hundred MHz faster. But that is extra work and risk for not a lot of gain. Sure I could bench it at 4.9 if I pushed the volts over 1.5, the fans to max and added a little extra cooling, but it isn't pleasant to use that way. And I had to check the liquid metal after heating it so bad.
But I replaced that one with a 5775c and moved the 4770k to a tiny mini itx slim pc where it runs an undervolted 3.9 and is still pleasantly fast. Bought a different 4770k to run all of my old stuff for my daughter before I decided on the 5775c and the daughter's 4770k isn't as fast as yours for the volts and is still decent. I have hers running 4.3 at 1.25v for quick stability.

Depends what you want to do with it. It is already tuned for easy enjoyment. Or you can totally max it out and have fun doing that. A quick and rough ram oc can help performance a bit too. But can be frustrating when you push it too far. Using XMP settings (if they are stable) is the easy way to get most of those benefits.
Never really OC'd RAM before, not sure if the ram I have is overclockable (words?)
I'm pretty happy with 4.4 @ 1.2V, it is a great combination of quick and cool :)
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,981 Posts
I don't know if more fans make sense for you. I don't know where you would put them to improve your current setup. For example, if you put a second exhaust fan at the top, it will just steal fresh air from the intake fan that's closest to it, making things worse.

You could experiment some more with what you have right now. I would try removing the top exhaust fan and completely closing the top. Air can then only escape your case through the back. The air flow might improve and make this work better than using an exhaust fan at the top.

Does your case support a 140mm fan in the rear? You could then replace your current 120mm there with the 140mm fan you currently have at the top.

Another idea would be using that fan you currently have at the top as a third intake fan. You could put it at the top in front of the CPU cooler. I don't know if that's good, maybe something unfortunate happens together with that other intake fan right next to it, but I'd still try it to see what happens.

What happens if you remove that panel in the PSU compartment towards the front of the case? Will it look ugly with that hole there? With it open, can you then install an intake fan at the bottom of the case? A fan getting air from the bottom could help when gaming, when the graphics card gets hot and needs more fresh air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I don't know if more fans make sense for you. I don't know where you would put them to improve your current setup. For example, if you put a second exhaust fan at the top, it will just steal fresh air from the intake fan that's closest to it, making things worse.

You could experiment some more with what you have right now. I would try removing the top exhaust fan and completely closing the top. Air can then only escape your case through the back. The air flow might improve and make this work better than using an exhaust fan at the top.
Hmm that could be interesting to try, I always thought you wanted to have equal pressure of airflow going in/out so thats why I have it set up for 2 in / 2 out.
Does your case support a 140mm fan in the rear? You could then replace your current 120mm there with the 140mm fan you currently have at the top.
Only a 120mm sadly, it's a pretty small case.
Another idea would be using that fan you currently have at the top as a third intake fan. You could put it at the top in front of the CPU cooler. I don't know if that's good, maybe something unfortunate happens together with that other intake fan right next to it, but I'd still try it to see what happens.
I might try that, sounds like a good idea
What happens if you remove that panel in the PSU compartment towards the front of the case? Will it look ugly with that hole there? With it open, can you then install an intake fan at the bottom of the case? A fan getting air from the bottom could help when gaming, when the graphics card gets hot and needs more fresh air.
All of my wiring is stuffed down there, there won't be any room to add a fan there sadly :\

Check out my new pic , I added LEDs finally :D
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
I'd remove the top fan as it really doesn't make sense. Using a single fan on a twin tower IMO isn't optimal, air pass easier through the path of least resistance and in your CPU cooler that would be from the top, bottom and front of your CPU cooler as opposed to through the first tower.
Your case is also making your GPU sag really badly.
Does your GPU run warm?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I'd remove the top fan as it really doesn't make sense. Using a single fan on a twin tower IMO isn't optimal, air pass easier through the path of least resistance and in your CPU cooler that would be from the top, bottom and front of your CPU cooler as opposed to through the first tower.
Your case is also making your GPU sag really badly.
Does your GPU run warm?
I broke the retaining clip on my motherboard that is supposed to hold the GPU up, so yes it is sagging badly. Not too sure what I can do about it sadly :\
GPU runs about 30C while idle, and 60-70C while gaming.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,981 Posts
Hmm that could be interesting to try, I always thought you wanted to have equal pressure of airflow going in/out so thats why I have it set up for 2 in / 2 out.
About that, here's an interesting video of an old case from ten years ago, where they used a smoke machine to make air flow visible:


That case worked great without any exhaust fans (but a rear exhaust fan made it work better). It shipped with two strong 180mm fans. The top front area of the case was completely closed, and I guess that part being closed was important to make the air flow work like you can see in the video. That old case already had the same perforation on the rear metal panels and on the PCI slots that your modern case has as well. If you try to do "positive pressure" by using more intake fans than exhaust fans, the air should escape over there for you as well, hopefully same as in that video.
 

·
Nvidia "shill"
Joined
·
1,429 Posts
Just don't do this (the picture)

Anyway jokes aside VCCIN can sometimes help alleviate a high Vcore. As said above if you can do 4.4GHz at 1.190v then you should easily be able to hit 4.5GHz with 1.21 or 1.22v (somewhere in that region). Haswell is safe up to at least 1.3v, I ran my 4690K at 1.35v for years and had no issue but that was keeping core temps below 80C. Sold the chip a few weeks ago and the new owner runs it at 1.33v at 4.4GHz as a daily driver, but it of course was a bad binned chip. It really all varies from chip to chip, one might be okay at 1.4v for years with no degradation, another may degrade at just 1.2v you never know, its just a risk you sometimes have to take. Of course do what you are comfortable doing, but as long as it doesn't thermal throttle its whole life you shouldn't have too much to worry about.
 

Attachments

1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top