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Hey guys!
So I have 2 hard drives, one is a 500gb and another is 1TB. I've had the 500gb one for about a year now, and the 1TB for a bout 3 days. Both of them write at about 100MB/s, and I really want to put them into Raid 0. Hopefully to get my speeds up to at least 150mb/s. I don't think I have anything important on them, I backup most of my programming work on Mega. I just don't wanna put them in Raid, and have them die instantly. I'm planning to get like a 1TB SSD in the future (1-2 months?). RIP wallet, but I'm saving towards it and will help me in the future.
 

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Raid 0 is pretty sub optimal at the best of times. Combining 2 different size and make HDD on what I'm assuming is not an actual proper SAS card the no its not an good idea, not a good idea at all.

Raid 0 on an consumer grade mobo that essentially runs software raid is not going to net much performance anyway.
 

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If you do that you will end up with 1TB of raid0 storage. (500+500gb in raid 0)
but with doubble the performance -0-30% inferface transfer performance loss
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bit_reaper View Post

Raid 0 on an consumer grade mobo that essentially runs software raid is not going to net much performance anyway.
Thats just wrong. If your using 2HDD in raid 0 whenever you read or write. both hdd take half of the data and write at the same time. Thus doubble the performance.

Plorbem with onboard raid is that their controler is slow and you get more interface trasnfer speed loss compared to a raid card
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iwamotto Tetsuz View Post

If you do that you will end up with 1TB of raid0 storage. (500+500gb in raid 0)
but with doubble the performance -0-30% inferface transfer performance loss
Thats just wrong. If your using 2HDD in raid 0 whenever you read or write. both hdd take half of the data and write at the same time. Thus doubble the performance.

Plorbem with onboard raid is that their controler is slow and you get more interface trasnfer speed loss compared to a raid card
Yes in theory but in none synthetic real world applications onboard raids have much of that potential performance is lost due to fact that there are no dedicated caches (as well as many other missing features). You might get an decent improvement in pure sequential writes but unless you are look for improved sequential write speed for a very specific reason like storing uncompressed screen capture videos then the sequential write numbers aren't actually all that important.

Then there is the question of what the current performance numbers of OP's drives. If one for example is an 500 GB caviar black then its native write speed could be somewhere between 60-100 mb/s depending on where on the platter the data is. If the other 1 Tb drive is something like an green drive which sit somewhere in the 40-80 range then you could even end up loosing performance.

Additionally in OP's situation specifically there might be other issues as well due to the drives having different densities (like reader head sync up issues).
 

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If no drives fail, or have bad sectors. then you will have 0 compatibility issues or stabability issues
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Originally Posted by Bit_reaper View Post

Additionally in OP's situation specifically there might be other issues as well due to the drives having different densities (like reader head sync up issues).
Op also said that both drives top out at about 100mb/s. thats like normal sata 2 trasnfer speeds

I use raid 0 with onboard raid. and I can tell you, moving from 1drive to a raid 0 2x drive is a big driffrence.
2x drives in raid 0 is like blazing fast and 5x is just Oh yeah
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