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Dances with a Screwdriver
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Back in the day of 30 pins and 72 pins memory, back when memory used to be about $50 per megabyte for smaller capacity and up to $100/MB for 16 and 32MB sticks, there used to be adapter that allowed people to combine smaller cheaper memory sticks into one or to convert 30 pins memory into 72 pins slot.
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I used to have 2 for my old Macintosh, it allowed me to use 4x 4MB 72 pins SIMMs into one slot, as I was able to pick up a bunch of 4MB sticks dirt cheap while 16MB sticks were still very pricey.

They were sold under the name SIMM Tree or SIMM Stacker. One model came in 4 different design, tall right, short right, tall left, and short left so one person could use 4 adapters onto one motherboard without clearance issue.

The concept seems to have died with 72 pins memory. Back then, the only issue the user needed to mind was if the computer required parity bits (9 bits 30 pins or 36 bits 72 pins) and the speed (80ns was common for most 72 pins) Today the memory stick has like 20 different variables that makes mixing brand and models a problem. I'm guessing another issue is longer data path and higher clock speed means higher risk of error and problems.

I'm bringing this because it happens that I have a huge pile of leftover memory sticks. Right now I have 8 unused 2GB DDR3 (all same brand and models) and if there were a modern DDR3 adapter I could get extra memory for a lot less than what the current market is for 4x4GB sticks. But I guess it's just pipe dream.

PS what to do with leftover memory sticks? I got 2 DDR2, 6 DDR1, a crap load of PC100/133, 72 pins, 30 pins, and a few RAMBUS from socket 423 P4 system. I can;t test any of them other than DDR3, and with my old iMac, any PC100/133 64MB max/
 

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Fry's still carries adapters like that, and I think I've seen them for dual SO-DIMM-to-DIMM sockets, but I don't remember if the desktop DIMM adapters could handle more than one DIMM at a time. I think they were made for DDR, but I don't know about DDR2. Maybe the signals got too fast to make them practical for multiple DIMMs?
 
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