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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
As many have stated Tygon is your go to in terms of soft tubing. The other choices you mentioned are garbage.
The big question involving tubing is permeation and zmt and epdm fail miserably.
Back in the day the Tygon variants thar people used were:
Tygon E-1000 - If you want softer tubing and minimal bend radius then choose this.
Tygon R-3400 - Black in color, R-3400 is resistant to ultraviolet light, ozone and weathering, making it ideal for many outdoor applications. Standard inventoried sizes offer sufficient wall thickness to block transmission of all UV light.

I used Norprene tubing sold by Swiftech and didn't like it, the water absorption (by the tubing) was high.

Please don't use soap or oil as previously suggested. If it gets dispersed inside your loop it WILL ruin it and may damage your pump.
With Tygon just use a kettle to boil some water and put the tubing end inside for some minutes, and repeat if necessary.
I think the Tygon A-60 I bought has Norprene written along the side (which hopefully will wash off), but perhaps Norprene is a somewhat generic descriptor, and the Tygon is still better?

In any case, as long as it doesn't compromise the potential bend radius too much, I really hope it's soft enough to attach without too much difficulty.

BTW, if a bend radius is too small, will it kink immediately, or otherwise signal that I need to make an adjustment? If it just slowly kinks until finally stopping the flow two weeks later, I'll have no idea there's a problem, at least not when I'm actually able to work around it smoothly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Yes I'm returning my ZMT to EK which I just received a week ago, unknown to me at that time this had become an issue. As I mentioned earlier, my old ZMT tube didn't have that problem. Kinda **** of EK to skimp on the quality there. What's the point of buying ZMT tube if you're going to flush out crap and clean blocks, then we might as well just go back to using PVC tubes with plasticizers and don't care.
Not to mention, cleaning that sh#t out of every block, then running a wire brush through every section of tube is about as far from "no maintenance" as I can conceive.
 

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I think the Tygon A-60 I bought has Norprene written along the side (which hopefully will wash off), but perhaps Norprene is a somewhat generic descriptor, and the Tygon is still better?

In any case, as long as it doesn't compromise the potential bend radius too much, I really hope it's soft enough to attach without too much difficulty.

BTW, if a bend radius is too small, will it kink immediately, or otherwise signal that I need to make an adjustment? If it just slowly kinks until finally stopping the flow two weeks later, I'll have no idea there's a problem, at least not when I'm actually able to work around it smoothly.
Tygon Norprene is some type of closed cell neoprene formulation.
RE the bending radius i insert one end in the barb first and then see the bend it needs to do without kinking. If it starts to kink you have to give more slack.
The tubing only kinks if you exceed the bend radius allowed/designed for.
Once you connect both ends of the tube already kinked it stays that way It does’t slowly collapse when the sistem is shutdown as the water tends to deposit in the lower parts of the loop.
As allways there is a compromise: thin walled tube have a higher bend radius but kinks more easily, thick walled tube is the opposite.
 

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If you’re cutting acrylic, take your sweet a$$ time. Applying excessive force will cause it to crack.

If you’re drilling and you don’t have access to a drill press, just clamp it down, use a regular drill, and let the bit do all the work.

I believe you can find plastic drill bits that have the correct shape to mitigate damage to acrylic. I drilled / cut through a sheet of clear acrylic once using a dremel and I believe metal drill bits.
 

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I have done some cutting/drilling in my Parvum cases. It's really easy. Just brace and clamp it properly and don't get in a hurry. Use a standard multi-purpose drill bit or a step bit for cutting larger holes and use a slower drilling speed.
 

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anr11 is correct.

When drilling acrylic slow and steady is the way to go. If you drill too fast not only do you stand a good chance of cracking the acrylic, at high speed you can also start to melt the acrylic drill shavings. After re-hardening, these drill shavings will be harder than the surrounding acrylic and will be difficult to remove.

This also applies when cutting acrylic. You can cut smallish cuts with a hacksaw, coping saw or a dremel cutting wheel (on slow speed), but for large cuts use a jig saw (turn off the orbital cut feature) on slow speed with a metal cutting blade.

Before drilling or cutting always tape out your work area (both sides if possible) to reduce the chance of the acrylic cracking around the working edge.
 
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