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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As title says, when I flash a different vBios from the stock one on my MSI GTX1080 Armor OC, the display does not work at all until Windows starts up. There is a blank screen that persists until the login screen. I am using DVI and DP ports for display. I've also tried the HDMI Port. What am I doing wrong? Also, am in UEFI mode on bios.

Thanks in advance!
 

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This was the bios I flashed to my 1080 ARMOR for a way higher power target with no problems at all. I am using two display ports for displays.
 

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So booting isn't waking your monitor?
Or is your boot sequence just skipping the BIOS screen?

It's not uncommon for MSI GPUs running MSI BIOSs plugged into MSI motherboards to not reset the monitor on boot.
Don't know why it is, but my MSI 1080 Gaming X never woke my monitor on reboot, no matter what BIOS I used.
I was using the Display Port.
Had to cycle my monitor on reboot every time if I wanted into the Motherboard BIOS.

Does your motherboard have IGD? Have you set your motherboard display settings to [PEG]?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, the post I posted seems to be deleted, as well as one hostile comment I got from a user :p
Anyways, I got it fixed by downloading the DP firmware update from NVIDIA.
Thank-you all!
 

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Anyways, I got it fixed by downloading the DP firmware update from NVIDIA.
Thank-you all!
Compliance to forum rules this should be your primary priority.
Either way I did find your topic as very interesting and weird too, my VGA GTX1060 card this is production of 7-2017 and does not missing this firmware patch.
What is the production date of your 1080 ?


2486334
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Compliance to forum rules this should be your primary priority.
Either way I did find your topic as very interesting and weird too, my VGA GTX1060 card this is production of 7-2017 and does not missing this firmware patch.
What is the production date of your 1080 ?


View attachment 2486334
I thought that this was weird as well!
I don't know the manufacturing date of my GTX 1080, but I am pretty sure that it should include the dp 1.3 update, as it did work with the original vbios.
However, I do think that the new vbios did not include this update or had a unsupported/incompatible efi firmware, therefore making the gpu not output the correct image.
 

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It was manufactured on 2018 04
which is newer than the bios build date of what I flashed.
The only possible explanation could be that at specific timing, for the specific chip (GTX 1080 revision) in control of Display port, NVIDIA relative firmware this was under last stages of development.
An second and more great in chances possibility, this is that your firmware toying engagement this corrupted a good working vBIOS rom, and an extra step of recovery this was now necessary.

Either way, problem this is now solved and case this is now closed.
Be a good boy from now and in the future.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The only possible explanation could be that at specific timing, for the specific chip (GTX 1080 revision) in control of Display port, NVIDIA relative firmware this was under last stages of development.
An second and more great in chances possibility, this is that your firmware toying engagement this corrupted a good working vBIOS rom, and an extra step of recovery this was now necessary.

Either way, problem this is now solved and case this is now closed.
Be a good boy from now and in the future.:)
Welp, the vbios shouldn't have been corrupted since reflashing the vbios from the same series from techpowerup or from my backup restored the functionality.
Anyways, it was a good bit of adventure.

Thanks everyone.
 

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Welp, the vbios shouldn't have been corrupted since reflashing the vbios from the same series from techpowerup or from my backup restored the functionality.
Anyways, it was a good bit of adventure.

Thanks everyone.
The source of vBIOS file this is irrelevant as far this is the appropriate one.
Its one VGA card has specific hardware configuration, (number of DC fan, Display ports, power control components with specific power handling capacity) when flashing vBIOS from other manufacturer, parts of ROM with configuration settings from previews manufacturer they might be deleted.
Regular vBIOS step-up update with a file coming from this VGA card maker (MSI), this will partially update of a few settings.

Spesific BIOS Flash Memory IC Chip - Winbond at my card, this is a large container of code and regular vBIOS update this is just 125kb.
For you and every one else reading this ... you better stop making assumptions because I hate watching cards getting bricked, especially at VGA shortage times that we are facing.

This is a warning written with allot of positive energy from my end.
 

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I have just discovered storage potentials of W25Q40EW BIOS chip (due it datasheet), this is capable to hold added registers within sectors( lets make it simple), total size of required file for total rewrite of all it available space this is must be 750kb.

Therefore if you do not have an 750kb BIOS file at your hands? then this is partial update.
Offered Bios updates by Nvidia or MSI, these are 145kb approximately.
Now do your own math, but the conclusion will be always one and the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have just discovered storage potentials of W25Q40EW BIOS chip (due it datasheet), this is capable to hold added registers within sectors( lets make it simple), total size of required file for total rewrite of all it available space this is must be 750kb.

Therefore if you do not have an 750kb BIOS file at your hands? then this is partial update.
Offered Bios updates by Nvidia or MSI, these are 145kb approximately.
Now do your own math, but the conclusion will be always one and the same.
Your W25Q40EW EEPROM (the BIOS chip, that's what it's called), is in fact, not 750kb.
It is a 4mb chipset, as you can see from here: Code Storage Flash Memory - Serial NOR Flash - W25Q40EW - Winbond -
And, no. I'm not making any assumptions, and I made sure to dump and analyze every time I flashed, and this is not the first time for me.
I've flashed many times at this point and I know what I'm getting myself into, and I have the tools I need to repair things if something goes wrong.
I also know that partial BIOS updates exist, and is frequently used in the industry.
Thanks for the warning, but I think it's wrong of you to assume that I'm just blindly making judgements here.
I do agree, though, that one should not be doing this sort of stuff without any backup plans or a means to repair, since tinkering with this stuff really can brick your card for good.
 

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The source of vBIOS file this is irrelevant as far this is the appropriate one.
Its one VGA card has specific hardware configuration, (number of DC fan, Display ports, power control components with specific power handling capacity) when flashing vBIOS from other manufacturer, parts of ROM with configuration settings from previews manufacturer they might be deleted.
Regular vBIOS step-up update with a file coming from this VGA card maker (MSI), this will partially update of a few settings.

For you and every one else reading this ... you better stop making assumptions because I hate watching cards getting bricked, especially at VGA shortage times that we are facing.

This is a warning written with allot of positive energy from my end.
That came off pretty dramatic, I cringed. I think most people are aware of the risks and processes when flashing a new vbios otherwise they wouldn't be doing it in the first place.

If someone isn't clued up enough to match the device ID, memory type, ports etc to the stock vbios then they shouldn't really be doing it in the first place. But even if you were to apply an incompatible vbios version, it's easy enough to reflash using another GPU/onboard or by doing it blind. There are plenty of really basic preparations to prevent this, and you can even reflash before you restart and commit to the new bios if you think its gone bad. A completely bricked card usually only results from a failed flash, corruption, or by flashing a completely irrelevant bios file (i.e. gtx 980 on a 2080).

Of course there are some risks to bios flashing, but the stakes aren't nearly as high as you implied with your tone in that post though lol.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That came off pretty dramatic, I cringed. I think most people are aware of the risks and processes when flashing a new vbios otherwise they wouldn't be doing it in the first place.

If someone isn't clued up enough to match the device ID, memory type, ports etc to the stock vbios then they shouldn't really be doing it in the first place. But even if you were to apply an incompatible vbios version, it's easy enough to reflash using another GPU/onboard or by doing it blind. There are plenty of really basic preparations to prevent this, and you can even reflash before you restart and commit to the new bios if you think its gone bad. A completely bricked card usually only results from a failed flash, corruption, or by flashing a completely irrelevant bios file (i.e. gtx 980 on a 2080).

Of course there are some risks to bios flashing, but the stakes aren't nearly as high as you implied with your tone in that post though lol.
And besides, there are measures to prevent you from flashing the wrong bios in the first place.
People who don't have any idea probably will not go searching for modified nvflash tools that let you bypass these restrictions in the first place, and even if they do, they need to know how to use the tool properly for this to work anyways.

Anyways, in your setup, I see that you have a MSI GTX 1080 Armor liquid cooled!
Mind showing us how that looks like and was achieved?
Would love to know how it performs as well!
Also would love to know what bios you are using and some benchmark numbers if you've got some!

Thanks in advance!
 

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People who don't have any idea probably will not go searching for modified nvflash tools
1) I am not after any debate, but the first ones ready to play with the fire, always are the clueless.
2) W25Q40EW, this is not an empty tea cup, 750kb this is for storage of your very own code, and the sum of this math it is not given by words at the datasheet.
You have to inspect the block diagram and make the math by your self.
W25Q40EW, this is programed and kicking from the production line, then NVIDIA or AMD will add also their code.
Anyway, more or less, this is the general idea.


GTX 10xx GPU they have 10MB of ram on their die, for storage of code related to hardware = Chip revision.
And I suppose that this is double-write-protected area. :devilish:

At the pile of YouTube, I found a video that this is the greatest proof to me, that BIOS does not hold back the GPU regarding performance.
At a board made for GTX1060 someone replaced the chip with GTX1070, a few capacitors changed too, but this Frankenstein it did boot and performed as regular GTX1070 :)
Therefore true power and performance comes from the car engine and not from the spark plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
At the pile of YouTube, I found a video that this is the greatest proof to me, that BIOS does not hold back the GPU regarding performance.
At a board made for GTX1060 someone replaced the chip with GTX1070, a few capacitors changed too, but this Frankenstein it did boot and performed as regular GTX1070 :)
Therefore true power and performance comes from the car engine and not from the spark plugs.
Huh, that 1070 frankenstein sounds interesting..
I suppose they changed the ram as well from 6gb to 8gb?
Or did they just change the capacitor configuration to support 6gb?

That aside, I would have to disagree with you on a few points.
The BIOS, varying from manufacturer, has various artificial power limits set, which does limit a card's performance in a degree.
That's why shunt modding and BIOS modding/crossflashing exists in the first place.
While it may perform to spec, overclocked performance will vary with BIOS and VRM configuration.
The EEPROM, to add, contains ONLY the BIOS code, as you can find out if you've ever read and flashed the chipset with a CH341A programmer.
No NVIDIA or AMD addon-code, just the BIOS itself. If there are any addon-codes like you mentioned, they are on the BIOS image itself, not anywhere else.
The BIOS image IS sectored however, to various parts, as you'll find out if you view the image in a hex editor by a buffer of zeros. (Maybe this is what you meant as in 750kb..?)

Also, I do not know if the board that was used in the YouTube video you mentioned was,
but considering that the 1060's TDP is rated as 120W, and 1070's TDP as 150w according to Tom's Hardware: GPU Benchmarks and Hierarchy 2021: Graphics Cards Ranked,
(Also backed by default BIOS from TechPowerup: NVIDIA GTX 1060 VBIOS and NVIDIA GTX 1070 VBIOS)
I am sure the PCB isn't a reference PCB, or else the reference PCB would have had to have some serious headroom.
And even if it did function, the longevity of the GPU, as well as the overclocking performance would be questionable.

Lastly, if you were to compare the GPU to a car, I wouldn't call the VRMs and peripherals mere spark plugs.
If the core is like a car engine, then the VRMs are more like the fuel injection system, as they provide the necessary fuel, or in this case wattage for the core to perform.
If there is no fuel, the engine cannot run. If there is a lack of fuel, it runs poorly. If there is too much, the engine will create waste heat. The VRM is there to give the adequate amount of fuel to the engine, just like the fuel injection system.
 

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the VRMs are more like the fuel injection system, as they provide the necessary fuel, or in this case wattage for the core to perform.
I am not going to disagree, for one very simple reason, if I do? Then I will be forced to teach electrical engineering at every one in this forum.:)
Personally I am in total denial to accept any modification as successful, when there is no actual electrical measurements them working as proofs, that such actions are not going to force this electronic circuit to collapse.
 

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Anyways, in your setup, I see that you have a MSI GTX 1080 Armor liquid cooled!
Mind showing us how that looks like and was achieved?
Would love to know how it performs as well!
Also would love to know what bios you are using and some benchmark numbers if you've got some!
Thanks for interest! I'm just about to rebuild it from a weird setup into a new Fractal case so I don't have any pictures yet, but it works great.

I got a second-hand Evga CLC 120 AIO off Ebay and used the NZXT G12 to mount it onto the card. It now keeps the GPU below 60C when previously it would hit or exceed 80C with the standard Armor cooler. I expect temps to go down further when I mount it in the new Fractal case as it will be mounted as a front rad, instead of sitting loose like it is in the bottom of my current Corsair 650D case lol. Very effective for the money though, I recommend it if you're looking to lower temps.

With its final OC curve, memory OC and higher board power bios (see my first post in this thread) I'm getting a graphics score of 24,139 in Fire Strike. This is versus around 22,000 stock, so I'm happy enough for the time being. It brought RDR2 up from 61fps to 69fps avg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for interest! I'm just about to rebuild it from a weird setup into a new Fractal case so I don't have any pictures yet, but it works great.

I got a second-hand Evga CLC 120 AIO off Ebay and used the NZXT G12 to mount it onto the card. It now keeps the GPU below 60C when previously it would hit or exceed 80C with the standard Armor cooler. I expect temps to go down further when I mount it in the new Fractal case as it will be mounted as a front rad, instead of sitting loose like it is in the bottom of my current Corsair 650D case lol. Very effective for the money though, I recommend it if you're looking to lower temps.

With its final OC curve, memory OC and higher board power bios (see my first post in this thread) I'm getting a graphics score of 24,139 in Fire Strike. This is versus around 22,000 stock, so I'm happy enough for the time being. It brought RDR2 up from 61fps to 69fps avg.
That's really nice :)
Is the VRM cooling adequate?
It really can't get worse from the stock cooler tho can it lol

The BIOS you've posted seems to be the stock with the wattage increased a bit.
I wonder why they would have multiple versions in the first place..?
 
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