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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xinck View Post

How is it that some people's 670's and 680's have power targets higher than 122%? is it different bios and flashed bios? or simply different brands?

Also

How do the memory clocks that are like in the 6000's for 670's and mine are only 3400?
each manufacturer is possibly different; using MSI Afterburner?

You need to double the memory freq. readout.

 

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I got 131% here, but have my memory overclocked to 1802MHz
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1802*4 gives me 7204 effect clock on my memory.

The way memory works in GPUz is that it is the base clock of the memory (1802 in my case). In Afterburner, it uses its own thing or wahtever it does, which is half the speed of the actual speed.

For GPU = Multiply by 4
MSI - Multiply by 2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am using Evga precision but afterburner is the same in frequency numbers.

And to Lord Xeb's comment- oh okay, that makes some sense, but why have there been people who have pictoral 6000 mhz memory clock in evga precision or other programs?

And to OS Wiz comment- I have seen other ASUS overclockers have more than 122% power target would they have flashed bios? or different bios in general? or is there some other explanation?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xinck View Post

IAnd to OS Wiz comment- I have seen other ASUS overclockers have more than 122% power target would they have flashed bios? or different bios in general? or is there some other explanation?
Sorry, I've no idea. Never used the Maximus V.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xinck View Post

I am using Evga precision but afterburner is the same in frequency numbers.

And to Lord Xeb's comment- oh okay, that makes some sense, but why have there been people who have pictoral 6000 mhz memory clock in evga precision or other programs?

And to OS Wiz comment- I have seen other ASUS overclockers have more than 122% power target would they have flashed bios? or different bios in general? or is there some other explanation?
The multi button allows you to make a multiquote comment
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But yeah, that is why you are able to see those clock speeds. You have to know what speed the program is using, then you can multiply it by either 2 or 4 to get the effective rate.
 

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GPU-Z = Shows the 'Actual' memory frequency (1500MHz on Kepler Cards)

Afterburner/PrecisionX = are still calibrated to the days when people were running DDR3 vram. DDR3 is what they call 'double-pumped', meaning that for every clock cycle, two bits worth of data are transferred. Thus, 1500MHz in GPU-Z = 3000MHz in Afterburner/PrecX. It doesn't take DDR3 or DDR5 into account, it just assumes you're running DDR3 and shows 2 x Actual memory frequency. I'd imagine the problem is that the driver API does not 'expose' the memory type (DDR3 vs DDR5) to the application, so they're just leaving it calibrated to DDR3 cause that's what people are 'used to' in terms of the way these two apps run.

Some other tools out there (I think the Asus tool is this way) are properly calibrated to DDR5, which is 'quad-pumped' memory ... for each clock cycle, 4 bits of data can be transferred. Thus, in these tools, you'll see them display 4 x Actual Memory Frequency, or 7000 6000MHz in the case of Kepler cards. This is referred to as the 'Effective' clock rate of the memory.

I'm certain you're mistaken in your recollection of seeing people running AB/PrecX wherein their memory clocks were >6000. It was probably a vendor-specific program like Trixx or the Asus OC'ing tool
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"Power Target" is determined by the bios of the card, which loosely equates to the 'model' of the card you have (I say loosely because sometimes cards change without the model # changing, and people sometimes flash their cards with bioses from other cards). However, no matter what the max power target % shows up as, the ACTUAL wattage the card is allowed to pull is the same on all models that have 2 x 6-pin connectors. Some cards are just set up on a different 'scale' than others.

Cards that have 6-pin + 8-pin (like my GB OC model) are calibrated to a different scale because this power connector configuration is rated at 300W max draw instead of 225W draw like 2 x 6-pin cards.

In any case, since the voltage is capped at 1.175V on (most) Keplers, the max power target % available on your card is certain to be more than the actual power draw your card is capable of pulling, so it's really nothing to concern yourself about
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by brettjv View Post

GPU-Z = Shows the 'Actual' memory frequency (1500MHz on Kepler Cards)

Afterburner/PrecisionX = are still calibrated to the days when people were running DDR3 vram. DDR3 is what they call 'double-pumped', meaning that for every clock cycle, two bits worth of data are transferred. Thus, 1500MHz in GPU-Z = 3000MHz in Afterburner/PrecX. It doesn't take DDR3 or DDR5 into account, it just assumes you're running DDR3 and shows 2 x Actual memory frequency. I'd imagine the problem is that the driver API does not 'expose' the memory type (DDR3 vs DDR5) to the application, so they're just leaving it calibrated to DDR3 cause that's what people are 'used to' in terms of the way these two apps run.

Some other tools out there (I think the Asus tool is this way) are properly calibrated to DDR5, which is 'quad-pumped' memory ... for each clock cycle, 4 bits of data can be transferred. Thus, in these tools, you'll see them display 4 x Actual Memory Frequency, or 7000 6000MHz in the case of Kepler cards. This is referred to as the 'Effective' clock rate of the memory.

I'm certain you're mistaken in your recollection of seeing people running AB/PrecX wherein their memory clocks were >6000. It was probably a vendor-specific program like Trixx or the Asus OC'ing tool
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"Power Target" is determined by the bios of the card, which loosely equates to the 'model' of the card you have (I say loosely because sometimes cards change without the model # changing, and people sometimes flash their cards with bioses from other cards). However, no matter what the max power target % shows up as, the ACTUAL wattage the card is allowed to pull is the same on all models that have 2 x 6-pin connectors. Some cards are just set up on a different 'scale' than others.

Cards that have 6-pin + 8-pin (like my GB OC model) are calibrated to a different scale because this power connector configuration is rated at 300W max draw instead of 225W draw like 2 x 6-pin cards.

In any case, since the voltage is capped at 1.175V on (most) Keplers, the max power target % available on your card is certain to be more than the actual power draw your card is capable of pulling, so it's really nothing to concern yourself about
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OH okay! That all makes a lot more sense, thank you for clearing that up! Thank you very much!
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Sorry, that should've said 6000MHz ... I'm so used to my OC'd memory that I forgot to actually 'do the math' ...

Anyways, glad that cleared it up for ya
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This question about the way that memory speeds are on a different scale depending on what app you're using comes up quite a bit on the boards ... it is kinda confusing til you understand what all is involved
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Thanks brett, even I learned something here today.
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