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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

It's been about 5 years since I was last here and as you can see from the details in my sig, it's getting on a bit and in need for a replacement.

I havnt been following the technology too closley for the past few years, but as I understand Intel seem to be leading the way somewhat? Having never built an Intel rig before I think it could be time to give it a go. I don't want to spend a huge amount but I suppose I could budget for £600.

I'm thinking about getting back into some PC gaming a little bit so would like the computer I end up with to be able to play games for the next 1-2 years without upgrading.

I hope this gives an idea of what I'd be looking for and that someone can recommend some components. Naturally theres requirements I have left out but I'm just seeking some general advice about what is good/bad in the Intel world at present and wether moving over from AMD right now is the best thing to do (Considering my budget)

Thanks!
 

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Both AMD and Intel have their benefits, but generally, Intel offers better performance and AMD offers cheaper prices.

Since you don't upgrade often, an Intel i7 CPU would probably be your best bet. They are ridiculously powerful, and will remain on top for quite a few years (given the present rate of performance progression).
 

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Price is bad. If u have a set budget, go amd. U will be able to budget a better system going Amd(higher quality parts) over buying Intel. Intel is the faster of the 2 but u pay for that speed. Hope this helps u
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Wiggy View Post
Hey guys,

It's been about 5 years since I was last here and as you can see from the details in my sig, it's getting on a bit and in need for a replacement.

I havnt been following the technology too closley for the past few years, but as I understand Intel seem to be leading the way somewhat? Having never built an Intel rig before I think it could be time to give it a go. I don't want to spend a huge amount but I suppose I could budget for £600.

I'm thinking about getting back into some PC gaming a little bit so would like the computer I end up with to be able to play games for the next 1-2 years without upgrading.

I hope this gives an idea of what I'd be looking for and that someone can recommend some components. Naturally theres requirements I have left out but I'm just seeking some general advice about what is good/bad in the Intel world at present and wether moving over from AMD right now is the best thing to do (Considering my budget)

Thanks!
do you need monitor/keyboard/mouse/os/case?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info. No, I've recently upgraded my monitor/sound system/etc so I'm really only looking for the tower. To be honest I'd be fairly happy to keep the case I have now as well. I'd be requiring motherboard/cpu/ram/gpu/psu/hdd.

http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/p...BB-9304G3.html

I'm looking at bundles such as these to get some ideas of what would work well together, they are asking £500 for that - I plan to look into how much that would be if I ordered everything individually and put it together myself
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by JumJum View Post
Price is bad. If u have a set budget, go amd. U will be able to budget a better system going Amd(higher quality parts) over buying Intel. Intel is the faster of the 2 but u pay for that speed. Hope this helps u

Intel isn't really that over-priced compared to AMD.
When comparing CPUs, you don't save all that much money choosing a Phenom x6 compared to an i7.

I do agree that AMD is cheaper and/or higher quality when you start looking at motherboards and RAM.

However, since the OP clearly doesn't intend to upgrade very often, it would be worth it to invest a bit more into an i7 that will be much more future-proof.
 

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I would recommend waiting till Q1 2011 if you can wait, so bulldozer and Sandy Bridge can officially be reviewed and compared so you can choose my newer tech

I personally would go bulldozer as sandy bridge will not be able to be OC'ed unless you buy "K" edition unlocked CPUs AFAIK
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Wiggy View Post
Thanks for the info. No, I've recently upgraded my monitor/sound system/etc so I'm really only looking for the tower. To be honest I'd be fairly happy to keep the case I have now as well. I'd be requiring motherboard/cpu/ram/gpu/psu/hdd.

http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/p...BB-9304G3.html

I'm looking at bundles such as these to get some ideas of what would work well together, they are asking £500 for that - I plan to look into how much that would be if I ordered everything individually and put it together myself
What is in that bundle isn't bad, but you won't be able to get the rest of the build for £100, especially not as you'll be doing some gaming so you'll want to spend over £100 on the graphics card alone.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ghettogeddy View Post
idk guys does he have a the budget for an i7 doesnt seem like he has need a whole lot of ther last 5 years i think a good amd pII 955be with 4 gigs of ram and a decent video card will hold him for a 5 more years comparing to what he has had
Yeah that's what I was thinking. Of course the i7s are great processors, but if you tried to fit one into a £600 budget you would end up sacrificing stuff like the graphics card, which matters far more for gaming.

I'll post you up a build in just a minute
 

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I'll make a quick and dirty guide. Keep in mind there is definitely more to this, but hey, I wrote this on the fly


CPU
Intel: The Core i series are the most powerful CPUs out there right now. They come in three flavors: Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7. The Core i3 is the entry-level CPU, i5 is mainstream, and i7 is enthusiast.

This is where it gets confusing: For the current generation, Intel has 2 sockets and three chipsets on the market.

The Core i3 is the entry-level chip. All Core i3s are dual cores, and unlike previous generations, the integrated graphics controller is on the CPU, not the motherboard. Core i3s use Socket 1156 boards, and if you want integrated graphics, you need an H55 chipset.

The Core i5 is the mainstream chip. All Core i5s with a model number below 750 are dual cores, and all Core i5s with a model number equal to or higher than 750 are quad cores. The Core i5s use Socket 1156 boards. The dual core Core i5s have the integrated graphics on the CPU, while the quad core Core i5s do not have integrated graphics. This means that if you want to use integrated graphics, you cannot use a quad core i5. Like the Core i3, if you want to use integrated graphics on the dual core Core i5s, you must get an H55 motherboard. Conversely, the quad core Core i5s are intended to be used with the P55 motherboards.

The Core i7s are the enthusiast line of CPUs. All Core i7s with a model number in the 800s use the Socket 1156, and all Core i7s with a model number in the 900s use the Socket 1366. All Core i7s are quad cores, and all Core i7s have the unique ability to hyperthread. This means that the CPU can create two virtual threads for every physical core, turning your i7 into a virtual 8-core CPU. The Core i7s with 800-series model numbers are meant to be used with the P55 chipset on Socket 1156, while the Core i7s with the 900-series model numbers are meant to be used on the X58 chipset with Socket 1366.

I hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks again everyone.

It's not so much that I can't afford to go over £600, I'd just need to hear a pretty strong argument haha.


Looking forward to seeing that build ellis
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Wiggy View Post
Thanks again everyone.

It's not so much that I can't afford to go over £600, I'd just need to hear a pretty strong argument haha.


Looking forward to seeing that build ellis
Personally (and I'm probably the unpopular opinion here), I'd go AMD. The Core i5/i7s are superior to the AMD Phenom IIs by far, but these days both CPUs are so powerful that games do not fully use up the CPUs. So while the i-series have better performance, most games do not tap into that extra power reserve.

I'd suggest an AMD Phenom II build, and put the difference into a better graphics card.
 

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Alright, here you go:

Quote:
CPU - AMD Phenom II X4 965:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/186428

Motherboard - MSI 785GM-E51:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/173978

RAM - Corsair 4GB (2x2GB) 1333MHz Kit:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/178943

GPU - Palit GTX 460 1GB Sonic Platinum:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/232640

HDD - Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/173804

DVD: Sony 24x DVD+/-RW etc. etc:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/220988

Case: Xigmatek Asgard:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/179016

PSU: Antec Earthwatts 500W:
http://www.ebuyer.com/product/202319
Total: £603.19

So you have AMD's fastest quad core CPU, a nice motherboard with decent overclocking features, fast RAM (don't need more than 4GB), a very nice graphics card which is already overclocked, a fast 1TB HDD, a cheap DVD burner, a nice looking case and a reliable PSU which will power everything you have no problem.

I included a case because (a) I thought "new build, nice to have a new case too" and (b) because your current case could be a different form factor and not have room for everything.

r31ncarnat3d, that's an excellent guide there, but I'd say AMD is better value at this price point.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ellisbodds View Post
Alright, here you go:

Total: £603.19

So you have AMD's fastest quad core CPU, a nice motherboard with decent overclocking features, fast RAM (don't need more than 4GB), a very nice graphics card which is already overclocked, a fast 1TB HDD, a cheap DVD burner, a nice looking case and a reliable PSU which will power everything you have no problem.

I included a case because (a) I thought "new build, nice to have a new case too" and (b) because your current case could be a different form factor and not have room for everything.

r31ncarnat3d, that's an excellent guide there, but I'd say AMD is better value at this price point.
Oh, no doubt, I definitely agree. You probably missed my second post explaining how games don't use the extra power of the Core i5/i7, but the only reason that was Intel-only was because this was posted in an Intel section


But I definitely agree with the AMD sentiment; at this price point and being a purely gaming PC, AMD is the better choice.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by r31ncarnat3d View Post
Personally (and I'm probably the unpopular opinion here), I'd go AMD. The Core i5/i7s are superior to the AMD Phenom IIs by far, but these days both CPUs are so powerful that games do not fully use up the CPUs. So while the i-series have better performance, most games do not tap into that extra power reserve.

I'd suggest an AMD Phenom II build, and put the difference into a better graphics card.
That's what I've done with my suggestions. In fact, from what I've heard there's barely any difference between the Core i5 750 and the Phenom 965. That's in gaming though, not sure about other stuff. And there is the 760 now which will be a tad faster and seems to have replaced the 750 completely.
EDIT: Maybe not, I just recall someone saying that on Newegg the 760 was cheaper than the 750. Haven't checked on there but it seems the 750 is cheaper in the UK still.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ghettogeddy View Post
do you have a specific website or store you will be buying from that way i can use it for a build my normal reference is newegg but they dont do euro lol
No Euros dude, this is the UK, and we use pounds £££.
I use ebuyer for all my computer bits and bobs and I've never had any problems.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by r31ncarnat3d View Post
Oh, no doubt, I definitely agree. You probably missed my second post explaining how games don't use the extra power of the Core i5/i7, but the only reason that was Intel-only was because this was posted in an Intel section


But I definitely agree with the AMD sentiment; at this price point and being a purely gaming PC, AMD is the better choice.
Yes, at the time I posted that I hadn't seen your second post
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ellisbodds View Post
That's what I've done with my suggestions. In fact, from what I've heard there's barely any difference between the Core i5 750 and the Phenom 965. That's in gaming though, not sure about other stuff. And there is the 760 now which will be a tad faster and seems to have replaced the 750 completely.
The Core i5/i7s are much faster overall, but as I said, games don't take advantage of that extra speed, hence why in games the two CPUs perform equally.

Personally, I only recommend the Core i-series if:

-The person has tons of cash to burn
-The person wants 'the best there is'
-The person is a media editor (Photoshop, video editing, etc)

From what I've seen, media editing and running servers are the only arenas where the i-series have truly shined. Photoshop is really the only reason I went with a Q9550 instead of the then-current Phenom.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by r31ncarnat3d View Post
The Core i5/i7s are much faster overall, but as I said, games don't take advantage of that extra speed, hence why in games the two CPUs perform equally.

Personally, I only recommend the Core i-series if:

-The person has tons of cash to burn
-The person wants 'the best there is'
-The person is a media editor (Photoshop, video editing, etc)

From what I've seen, media editing and running servers are the only arenas where the i-series have truly shined. Photoshop is really the only reason I went with a Q9550 instead of the then-current Phenom.
Makes perfect sense to me
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Quote:

Originally Posted by r31ncarnat3d View Post
I'll make a quick and dirty guide. Keep in mind there is definitely more to this, but hey, I wrote this on the fly


CPU
Intel: The Core i series are the most powerful CPUs out there right now. They come in three flavors: Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7. The Core i3 is the entry-level CPU, i5 is mainstream, and i7 is enthusiast.

This is where it gets confusing: For the current generation, Intel has 2 sockets and three chipsets on the market.

The Core i3 is the entry-level chip. All Core i3s are dual cores, and unlike previous generations, the integrated graphics controller is on the CPU, not the motherboard. Core i3s use Socket 1156 boards, and if you want integrated graphics, you need an H55 chipset.

The Core i5 is the mainstream chip. All Core i5s with a model number below 750 are dual cores, and all Core i5s with a model number equal to or higher than 750 are quad cores. The Core i5s use Socket 1156 boards. The dual core Core i5s have the integrated graphics on the CPU, while the quad core Core i5s do not have integrated graphics. This means that if you want to use integrated graphics, you cannot use a quad core i5. Like the Core i3, if you want to use integrated graphics on the dual core Core i5s, you must get an H55 motherboard. Conversely, the quad core Core i5s are intended to be used with the P55 motherboards.

The Core i7s are the enthusiast line of CPUs. All Core i7s with a model number in the 800s use the Socket 1156, and all Core i7s with a model number in the 900s use the Socket 1366. All Core i7s are quad cores, and all Core i7s have the unique ability to hyperthread. This means that the CPU can create two virtual threads for every physical core, turning your i7 into a virtual 8-core CPU. The Core i7s with 800-series model numbers are meant to be used with the P55 chipset on Socket 1156, while the Core i7s with the 900-series model numbers are meant to be used on the X58 chipset with Socket 1366.

I hope this helps

Thanks alot - incidently I swear I read recently that intel were in the process of releasing a chip with an intergrated GPU, are you saying this has been available for a while?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11243108

^^ this one, actually. Sandybridge as mentioned earlier.

Quote from the article:

Although Intel currently sell single units that can cope with both graphics and processing, the sets comprise two separate chips: a central processing unit (CPU) and the graphic processing unit (GPU).

I think I just answered my own question
 
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