Overclock.net banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,831 Posts
Might be NB or something like that
 

·
HGTTG
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
If you really want to know, buy Everest Ultimate, that actually tells you. You can compare the temps and their descritions in Everest to SpeedFan and then you can tell. In Everest the sys temp will be your MB temp. In regards to yours, one is probably the CPU, one is probably the MB and the third is anyone's guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by idahosurge View Post
If you really want to know, buy Everest Ultimate, that actually tells you. You can compare the temps and their descritions in Everest to SpeedFan and then you can tell. In Everest the sys temp will be your MB temp. In regards to yours, one is probably the CPU, one is probably the MB and the third is anyone's guess.
ya i found out wat the 1st 2 are just dont kno wat the 3rd is kinda wanna kno tho -2C lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
That's why I don't prefer Speedfan. I would assume the third one is looking for a temp probe that isn't really there and some weird error has it showing -2. Back when I tried to use it, it didn't show my mobo header fans' rpm right either. Everest is very nice, but there are plenty of free temp programs out there that are better than speedfan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Quote:

Originally Posted by champyg View Post
That's why I don't prefer Speedfan. I would assume the third one is looking for a temp probe that isn't really there and some weird error has it showing -2. Back when I tried to use it, it didn't show my mobo header fans' rpm right either. Everest is very nice, but there are plenty of free temp programs out there that are better than speedfan.
i use hw monitor only usualy look at my core temps other temps stay same always lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
Quote:
There are several ways to label available readings (temperatures, voltages, fan speeds). The first source should be the BIOS. Enter BIOS at boot, write down labels and readings and compare them to those reported by SpeedFan. You can use manufacturer's custom hardware monitors to match readings too. SpeedFan strictly adheres to available datasheets for each sensor chip. Please remember that hardware monitors chips have some pins (small connectors) that should be connected to some additional hardware (temperature probes, thermistors or thermocouples) in order to be able to read temperatures. Only a few hardware monitor chips do label their connectors with "CPU", "System" and the like. Most of them use labels like "Temp1", "Local" or "Remote". Hardware manufacturers connect available pins to different temperature sensors basically according to the physical placement of components on the motherboard. This means that the same chip, an ITE IT8712F, for example, might be connected to a sensor diode measuring CPU temperature on Temp2 and, on a different hardware, it might be connected on Temp1. If you have a "Local" sensor and a "Remote" labeled one, this usually means that "Local" is the temperature of the monitor chip itself and "Remote" is the temperature read from a "remote" probe. When you have properly identified which temperature sensor is which, try to lower the speed of each fan and look at reported speed and temperatures. This way you can match PWM controls (speeds) with fans. Please, note that if you do not allow SpeedFan to change any fan speed and set all the speeds too low, then SpeedFan won't be able to avoid overheating.
http://www.almico.com/sffaq.php
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top