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Mouse addict
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Discussion Starter #1
Disclaimer: Although the review sample was provided by Dream Machines, the review itself is 100% unbiased. All opinions are my own.

Features
The DM1 FPS has the exact same shell as Dream Machines’ earlier DM1 Pro S, but it comes with several changes under the hood. It now features the Pixart PMW3389 (capable of up to 16000 CPI) which is a slightly modified version of the PMW3360 that was exclusive to Razer for roughly 2 years. Instead of Omron switches the DM1 FPS now uses (blue) Huano switches for the main buttons which are rated for 20 million clicks. The biggest upgrade, however, is surely the new cable (which is the same as the one found on the FinalMouse Ultralight Pro Phantom).








Packaging
Dream Machines went back to the old packaging of the DM1 Pro S for the DM1 FPS. Interestingly the box says ’12.000 CPI’ whereas the software allows up to 16.000 CPI (which is the maximum that is supported by the specs). The mouse sits nicely cushioned in the box, along with a short manual and one set of replacement feet. There are already aftermarket feet which are compatible with the DM1 FPS for those who don’t like the stock feet. The cable is folded somewhat tightly, but luckily it’s flexible enough that this is not an issue.









The cable
Anybody who’s ever used the DM1 Pro S will exhale a sigh of relief upon first seeing (and feeling) the cable of the DM1 FPS. The Pro S had an ultra-stiff braided cable (very similar to the one seen on the regular FinalMouse ULP). When I first got the Pro S it scraped my pad badly even while using it with a bungee. To this day the kinks haven’t flattened entirely. Thankfully, the cable on the DM1 FPS is nothing like that. It’s not quite as flexible as a custom made paracord, but still more flexible than any other stock cable (including Razer’s excellent braided cables) I’ve used so far. It also fits neatly into my Zowie Camade, although a bungee isn’t really needed for this cable. For the record, it is approximately 1.65 metres long (measured).









Shape and weight
Shape wise the DM1 FPS is almost an exact copy of the original Steelseries Sensei. It’s a very ‘safe’ shape, without any sharp edges or deep curves that would force your hand into a certain position. The hump is positioned slightly towards the back, which makes this shape suitable for all three main gripstyles (palm, claw, fingertip). The main buttons don’t have any comfort grooves (which is a good thing, in my opinion, as this allows you to place your fingers more freely). The mouse gets thinner towards the middle (grip width is ~58 mm). Despite being an ambidextrous shape the DM1 FPS only has side buttons on the left, so it’s mostly suited for right-handed users.
Both the DM1 FPS and my DM1 Pro S come out at exactly 83g on my scale, which is a very good weight at that size. The weight is very well balanced.








Build quality
As the shell is the same as the one used for the DM1 Pro S the overall build quality is quite similar. The mouse is well-built overall without any creaking or parts scraping on the mouse pad. Although the main buttons feature Huano instead of Omron switches now the clicks themselves are very similar, i.e. snappy and of moderate stiffness. On my unit there’s a bit of pre- and post-travel on the main buttons (more so on the right one). The side buttons, on the other hand, have very little travel and actuate almost instantly. The scroll wheel has distinct steps, it doesn’t rattle (at least on my copy) and it doesn’t make too much noise during scrolling. In fact, my copy has no rattle whatsoever.
The mouse feet get shiny quickly but glide well, so there’s no real need to replace them (they’re quite fast actually, too).
Some words on the coating: I got the Blizzard White which features a matte coating (much like the Noir White) which is soft to the touch and provides good grip. At the same time it is susceptible to picking up marks, stains and dirt in general, however, and therefore requires a lot of maintenance. Those who don’t want having to clean their mouse fairly frequently will have to resort to the two glossy coatings (red and blue) which too are offered. Personally I’d like to see a fifth coating option for the DM1 FPS, namely a black matte coating (preferably the one used on the DM3 mini which is excellent) for those who neither want to get clean their mouse as often nor want a glossy coating.






First picture: Comparison with DM1 Pro S Glossy, Second Picture: Comparison with DM3 mini

Testing out-of-the-box
CPI divergence:
The DM1 FPS allows you to cycle through six colour-coded pre-set CPI steps out-of-the-box: 400/800/1600/2400/4800/12000. The actual (tested) CPI for these steps, however, was: 410/830/1650/2480/4980/3330. It’s obvious that the last step is unintended (most likely set to 3200 CPI in the firmware). Overall CPI accuracy is decent. Actual CPI is consistently higher than nominal CPI by a small percentage. Keep in mind that no mouse has 100% accurate CPI steps, a small deviation is always to be expected. It should also be noted that margin of error increases with CPI.

Sensor smoothing (motion delay):
I did those tests at the usual steps of 400, 800, 1600 and 3200 CPI. The 3389 is said to have no visible smoothing at and below 1800 CPI, 32 frames of smoothing at and above 1900 CPI, 64 frames at and above 6000 CPI and 64 frames at and above 11300 CPI. The two latter smoothing levels will be of no interest here. The control subject is a Roccat Kone Pure Owl-Eye which features a standard 3360 (no visible smoothing at and below 2000 CPI, 32 frames of smoothing at and above 2100 CPI). All the graphs have been normalised to account for any CPI deviations.

400 CPI:


No visible sensor smoothing.

800 CPI:


No visible sensor smoothing.

1600 CPI:


No visible sensor smoothing.

3200 CPI:



Yet again no latency difference which means that the 3389 in the DM1 FPS has the same amount of smoothing at this step as the 3360, which matches exactly what was indicated above.

Paint test:

No angle snapping, no unusual jitter.

PCS:

It is physically impossible to hit the perfect control speed of the 3389 on anything but a deskpad. Here’s one swipe at 400 CPI. Rest assured that it performs similarly at the other CPI steps.

Click delay:
I’m using a program called Bloody KeyResponseTime for this test. It’s not fully accurate but sufficient for giving ballpark estimations. The DM1 FPS ends up being roughly 0-2 ms slower than the KPOE in this test. The KPOE has click delay of about 7 ms which means that the DM1 FPS is somewhere in the 7-9 ms range, which is an excellent result.

Software
The software looks rather simple, but it has a decent range of options. All the settings can be saved to the internal memory of the DM1 FPS, which means that you can setup the mouse once and uninstall the driver afterwards. CPI can be adjusted in increments of 200 (which is most likely a bug as the 3389 allows CPI adjustment in increments of 50). Furthermore there’s the option to store up to six CPI levels. USB polling rate can be set to either 125, 250, 500 or 1000 Hz (all of these were stable on my system). Buttons are fully remappable and there’s a macro editor as well. Lastly the lighting can be set to several different modes (Neon, Static, Breath or Off) and adjusted in terms of cycle speed and colour. Unfortunately there’s no option for adjusting LOD for those who prefer a higher LOD (default is ~1.8 mm). Personally I quite liked the software and couldn’t find any major bugs or issues.

The verdict
The DM1 Pro S was already a very good mouse that was only let down by the ultra-stiff cable which created a lot of drag, especially on cloth pads. The DM1 FPS remedies this issue entirely and comes with the best stock cable of any gaming mouse to date. Performance wise the DM1 FPS fared very well in my tests. The combination of the highly flexible cable, the low weight and the highly responsive sensor make the DM1 FPS a treat to use in games. The only thing that’s missing in my book would be a version with a black matte coating.

Lastly I have a special wish for Dream Machines. Two out of the three ‘classic’ Steelseries shapes – i.e. Xai/Sensei, Kana, Kinzu – have been recreated (with updated internals) by Dream Machines so far. The one that’s missing is the Kana, which sits right between the Sensei and Kinzu in terms of size. The Kana shape is still cherished by quite a few people to this day, so I surely wouldn’t be the only one who’d be delighted to see this classic shape getting the DM treatment as well.

Picture album
 

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Registered
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6 Posts
Nice review man!
I really appreciate the sensor speed tests.
What is this orange cable on your DM3 mini? Custom made paracord?
 

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- Insanity Beckons -
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The verdict
Performance wise the DM1 FPS fared very well in my tests. The combination of the highly flexible cable, the low weight and the highly responsive sensor make the DM1 FPS a treat to use in games. The only thing that’s missing in my book would be a version with a black matte coating.
Further note to make this model sit in the upper stratosphere of GREATNESS is that Dream Machines need to use Alps scrollers because not having a distinctive feel whilst scrolling is a crime in itself so they missed out on appealing to those wanting a great feeling mouse.

Most manufacturers today forget about using quality scroll wheel encoders and always go for the cheapest rubbish, hence lose customers.

The Kana shape is still cherished by quite a few people to this day, so I surely wouldn’t be the only one who’d be delighted to see this classic shape getting the DM treatment as well.
Agreed, we need some Kana love from a manufacturer today using a 3389 sensor installed.
 

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Mouse addict
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762 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Nice review man!
I really appreciate the sensor speed tests.
What is this orange cable on your DM3 mini? Custom made paracord?

Thanks! It's indeed a CeeSa paracord.
 

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Mouse addict
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762 Posts
Discussion Starter #7

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Mouse addict
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762 Posts
Discussion Starter #9

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Not a Linux Lobbyist
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1,210 Posts
Found one:

Let me know if you need one with different CPI or zoomed in.
Looks pretty similar to the revel ones form here, should be enough, unless you would say otherwise by zooming in.
Thanks.
 

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Registered
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2,152 Posts
Missed that they released a new one, looks interesting though.
I did not like the buttons on the DM1 Pro S personally, they felt mushy and overall quite bad, same reason I am not using the Revel anymore.

Outside of Logitech the Ultralight Pro buttons feel good so something similar to that would be nice.
 

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Joined
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337 Posts
Nice review! :) Feels like with all the Air58 and everything else, people forget the DM1 FPS exists, it's such a good mouse.

Personally used a Blizzard White for a few months, hands down one of the best mice i have used in the past 2 years. Just overall a really good package.
 
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