Overclock.net banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
As far as I know,
trim has nothing to do with the mobo.
It all depends on if the SSD's control chip supports it or not.
Some newer ones can be enable with newer firmware updates, if not come in stadard.

Your OS has to recognize trim too. I believe vista/7 do, apperantly they support XP too with the correct drivers and tools installed.

But if you raid it, you lose trim. It's due to the RAID controller does not recognize trim at the moment. But garbage collection still works I believe.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
64,479 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by andynolife View Post
As far as I know,
trim has nothing to do with the mobo.
It all depends on if the SSD's control chip supports it or not.
Some newer ones can be enable with newer firmware updates, if not come in stadard.

Your OS has to recognize trim too. I believe vista/7 do, apperantly they support XP too with the correct drivers and tools installed.

But if you raid it, you lose trim. It's due to the RAID controller does not recognize trim at the moment. But garbage collection still works I believe.
Intel are updating the firmware to allow TRIM through RAID.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
65,162 Posts
TRIM Requirements:
1) SSD controller that supports TRIM (Indilinx, Intel G2, SandForce, some Samsung, some JMicron)
2*) SATA controller that can pass the TRIM command (All SATA controllers)
3) Drivers that can pass the TRIM command (Microsoft, Intel... Adaptec is working on it)
4) OS that supports the TRIM command (Windows 7)

*A SATA/RAID controller not using Microsoft or Intel drivers means no TRIM support (AMD, NVIDIA, ATI, Realtek, etc).

TRIM will be part of the ATA protocol when it is updated though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,496 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by ACHILEE5 View Post
IDE mode does Trim too!
Not quite accurate - at least, not for Intel SSD.

IDE mode does not allow native OS trim, you have to use the toolbox to perform trim tasks manually. This is how XP/Vista users get Trim.
AHCI mode is required for Win7's native Trim capability.
..a
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,511 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by eflyguy View Post
Not quite accurate - at least, not for Intel SSD.

IDE mode does not allow native OS trim, you have to use the toolbox to perform trim tasks manually. This is how XP/Vista users get Trim.
AHCI mode is required for Win7's native Trim capability.
..a
Works with my drives
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,543 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
TRIM Requirements:
1) SSD controller that supports TRIM (Indilinx, Intel G2, SandForce, some Samsung, some JMicron)
2*) SATA controller that can pass the TRIM command (All SATA controllers)
3) Drivers that can pass the TRIM command (Microsoft, Intel... Adaptec is working on it)
4) OS that supports the TRIM command (Windows 7)

*A SATA/RAID controller not using Microsoft or Intel drivers means no TRIM support (AMD, NVIDIA, ATI, Realtek, etc).

TRIM will be part of the ATA protocol when it is updated though.
i knew i saw something like that before. that's why i asked.

hmmm thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
In computing, a TRIM command allows an operating system to tell a solid-state drive (or "SSD") which data blocks are no longer in use, such as those left by deleted files. An OS operation such as delete generally only means the data blocks involved are flagged as not in use. TRIM allows the OS to pass this information on down to the SSD controller, which otherwise would not know it could overwrite those blocks safely.

In other words, less or little degrading.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by andynolife
View Post

In computing, a TRIM command allows an operating system to tell a solid-state drive (or "SSD") which data blocks are no longer in use, such as those left by deleted files. An OS operation such as delete generally only means the data blocks involved are flagged as not in use. TRIM allows the OS to pass this information on down to the SSD controller, which otherwise would not know it could overwrite those blocks safely.

In other words, less or little degrading.


Quote:


Originally Posted by ACHILEE5
View Post

Trim resets the memory in the SSD, so it's ready to be written to


thanks for the info +rep
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
65,162 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by ACHILEE5
View Post

Works with my drives


Have you actually tested TRIM? (Not just check the status)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,511 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Have you actually tested TRIM? (Not just check the status)
I hadn't

But when I was running Raid0. I did notice the lack of trim! "Once it took 40 minutes to install Windows"

So I'm pretty certain it works in IDE, as I never got the slow downs like I did in Raid.

But now with those new drivers for Raid "I have tested it!"
I copied a 20GB file to my C drive 4 times, as I had 50GB free on my Raid0 array! Each time deleting it then coping again. And my write speeds are consistent


OK it was only sitting at 100MB/sec, but that was because of my 640 drives aren't in raid. And it was from one of them I was copying from!

The slowest I got my Raid0 writing before, was 9MB/sec
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top